3

I am trying to clear my doubts w.r.t. Spring Transaction boundaries with following example.

@Transactional(propagation=Propagation.REQUIRES_NEW)
public void test() {    
    test1();
    test2();        
}

@Transactional(propagation=Propagation.NOT_SUPPORTED, readOnly=false)
public void test1() {
    this.jdbcTemplate.execute("INSERT INTO TEST VALUES('T', 'C2', 0, 1)");      
}

@Transactional(propagation=Propagation.SUPPORTS, isolation=Isolation.READ_UNCOMMITTED, readOnly=true)
public void test2() {
    System.out.println(this.jdbcTemplate.queryForInt("select count(*) from TEST"));         
}

I want to isolate test2() method from test1() that is each time test() is called test2() should not read the data committed by test1(). Please advice is it possible to handle this scenario using propagation or isolation attributes.

Thanks in advance.

2 Answers 2

6

Transaction attributes are applied to external calls , not internal calls made by bean method such as your case. If you want transaction boundaries applied to your call, you should inject your bean instance such as below. But I think that it is not good practice, I would not recommend.. The right way to accomplish is to define another spring bean and associate it with your previous bean and put your test method to this new bean.

@Service("yourBean")
@Transactional
public class YourBeanClass implement IYourBean {

   @Resource(name="yourBean")
    IYourBean yourBean;

        @Transactional(propagation=Propagation.REQUIRED)
    public void test() {    
        yourBean.test1();
        yourBean.test2();       
    }

    @Transactional(propagation=Propagation.REQUIRED)
    public void test1() {
        this.jdbcTemplate.execute("INSERT INTO TEST VALUES('T', 'C2', 0, 1)");      
    }

    @Transactional(propagation=Propagation.NOT_SUPPORTED)
    public void test2() {
        System.out.println(this.jdbcTemplate.queryForInt("select count(*) from TEST"));         
    }

}

Alternative and better way to solve this particular problem ;

 @Service("otherBean")
    @Transactional
    public class OtherBeanClass implement IOtherBean {

     @Autowired
     IYourBean yourBean;

      @Transactional(propagation=Propagation.REQUIRED)
        public void test() {    
            yourBean.test1();
            yourBean.test2();       
        }

   }



    @Service("yourBean")
    @Transactional
    public class YourBeanClass implement IYourBean {



        @Transactional(propagation=Propagation.REQUIRED)
        public void test1() {
            this.jdbcTemplate.execute("INSERT INTO TEST VALUES('T', 'C2', 0, 1)");      
        }

        @Transactional(propagation=Propagation.NOT_SUPPORTED)
        public void test2() {
            System.out.println(this.jdbcTemplate.queryForInt("select count(*) from TEST"));         
        }
}
3
  • Oh right, I could not grasp what made the code look weird to me in the first place. Indeed, Transactional will probably be ignored for test1 and test2 calls from test().
    – mrembisz
    Apr 4, 2011 at 14:17
  • I was referring to the original code from the question. Also I am not sure NOT_SUPPORTED is a safe choice for test2. Won't it cause commit of the existing transaction under some circumstances? I proposed REQUIRES_NEW which looks like a safer alternative since it will just grab another database connection.
    – mrembisz
    Apr 4, 2011 at 14:54
  • no, it does not cause the current transaction commit, current transaction is suspended during the executing of not_supported bean method, when it completes its exeuction, original transaction is resumed.. Apr 4, 2011 at 15:09
1

test() should probably be SUPPORTS, so if there is an existing TX, it will be propagated to test1(). test1() should be REQUIRED so your insert actually commits. test2() should be REQUIRES_NEW.

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