18

EDIT: As sunshinejr pointed out here, this has been fixed and will be released together with the next Xcode/Swift version.


I've seen a lot of weird behaviour after updating Xcode 10.1 to Xcode 10.2, both with Swift 4 and Swift 5 codebases.

One of the problems is that on one ViewController the ScrollView delegate methods are no longer called. The simplified view hierarchy is as follows:

| ScrollView (ParentScrollView)
| -- Stack View
| ---- ScrollView (ChildScrollView)
| ---- ScrollView (ChildScrollView)
| ---- ScrollView (ChildScrollView)

It acts as a view with several pages: ParentScrollView can be scrolled horizontally, the ChildScrollViews vertically.

The ViewController is the delegate of all Scrollviews (set in Storyboard), but the delegate methods (like scrollViewDidEndDecelerating) are not called when scrolling any of the views (ParentScrollView or ChildScrollView). The base class of ViewController conforms to UIScrollViewDelegate.

I have tried setting the delegates in code, other than that I have no idea what I could be doing wrong. The conversion did not change any code in the class, but everything worked well before updating. I also couldn't find any changes to gestures, delegates or ScrollViews in general in the Swift 5 Release Notes.

This seems to be a bug with the Swift 5 compiler. Additionally, sometimes it does work, sometimes it doesn't - all without changing any code or project settings.

Why does this no longer work? Has anyone else experienced similar behaviour?

  • Unrelated: There should be a better approach to do what you are trying to do than nesting scroll views. – Rakesha Shastri Mar 28 '19 at 8:36
  • @RakeshaShastri Hm, maybe as child view controllers? – Jan Schlorf Mar 28 '19 at 8:47
  • Maybe. I wouldn't know because i don't know what they are for. The downvotes may be because you haven't shown the question is too vague. P.S - i did not downvote. – Rakesha Shastri Mar 28 '19 at 8:53
  • 5
    This should not been downvoted at all! It's a breaking change in the latest Xcode / Swift compiler – Claus Jørgensen Apr 2 '19 at 11:17
  • @JanSchlorf Can you please update your edit with which exact version of Xcode and Swift fixes the issue, not just saying "next Xcode/Swift version"? – Banana Sep 23 '19 at 9:28
22

EDIT: As sunshinejr pointed out here, this has been fixed and will be released together with the next Xcode/Swift version.


I've found the issue, here's how to reproduce it.

class A: UIViewController, UIScrollViewDelegate {
    // ...does not implement 'scrollViewDidEndDecelerating'
}

class B: A {
    func scrollViewDidEndDecelerating(_ scrollView: UIScrollView) {
        // Will not be called!
    }
}

What does work:

class A: UIViewController, UIScrollViewDelegate {
    func scrollViewDidEndDecelerating(_ scrollView: UIScrollView) {
        // Probably empty
    }
}

class B: A {
    override func scrollViewDidEndDecelerating(_ scrollView: UIScrollView) {
        // Will be called!
    }
}

The compiler seems to think that a delegate method is not implemented if the base class did not implement it. If only the child class implements it, it can't find it.

I still can't explain why this behaviour changed with Swift 5, but at least I've found a solution. Maybe someone can give further insights?

| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    I can confirm this is the issue. It caused breaking bugs in our app as well as we upgraded yesterday. – Claus Jørgensen Apr 2 '19 at 11:17
  • 4
    This Swift 5 compiler bug applies potentially to all delegate methods not implemented in an associated base class. To make things even worse, this bug sometimes manifests itself only in Release builds. – Ely Apr 10 '19 at 21:49
  • @ClausJørgensen Have you found a solution by now? I'm now building with the previous version of Xcode, since trying to find all the possible error cases in our project is simply too risky. – Jan Schlorf Apr 11 '19 at 5:39
  • @JanSchlorf your solution works just fine. And if you think about how Objective-C selectors work, it kinda make sense this bug could happen. – Claus Jørgensen Apr 11 '19 at 10:29
  • Someone please file a radar (developer.apple.com/bug-reporting) and link it here! – Andrew Paul Simmons Apr 12 '19 at 17:42
4

We ran into this with a UITextViewDelegate

Another workaround is to add the @objc tag to the method in the superclass

| improve this answer | |
  • This worked for me even though all of my related code was in swift. I think it works because it introduces dynamic lookup/dynamic dispatch. – Andrew Paul Simmons Apr 12 '19 at 15:02
3

Looks like this issue existed back in 2016 as well and was fixed at one point: https://bugs.swift.org/browse/SR-2919

| improve this answer | |
  • I took the time to go in there, make an account and reopen it. Give it some upvotes so it gets attention. It's a pretty serious issue to have in a production ready compiler. – Fernando Mazzon Apr 25 '19 at 17:14
3

As Jan pointed out, this is a Swift 5 regression. This is tracked on Swift's JIRA as well as on radar (rdar://problem/49482328). This is also already fixed (PR here) but we need to wait for the next Xcode/Swift release.

Edit: As of Xcode 10.3, we observed that the bug is fixed, but we are still monitoring if it is fixed for good.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The mentioned PR says it's going to release of Swift 5.1, which should be shipped with Xcode 11 (Beta), not 10.3. – Eugene Berdnikov Sep 1 '19 at 23:33
1

I experienced the same issue only with the release scheme after upgrading to Xcode 10.2. I also tested Xcode 10.3 and it is exactly the same behavior.

For those who don't want to add @objc everywhere in your delegate implementation.

The quick solution is to disable the Swift 5 compiler optimisation in the build settings:

enter image description here

For those who already upgraded to Xcode 10.3, it seems that this build settings option is not visible anymore, but you can still change it directly via the pbxproj file of your project and it should appear in the xcode UI afterward. SWIFT_COMPILATION_MODE = singlefile;

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
0

Since all of UIScrollViewDelegate methods are optionals you will never see an error from compiler if it thinks that you didn't implement them, most probably what is happening is that Apple changed method signature in Swift 5 (again) and for some reason the migration tool didn't work.
Check the methods names along with UIScrollViewDelegate updated to USwift 5 documentation, you will see that probably your methods names are different, simply correct them and everything should work again.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thanks for your answer. The naming was correct, but I upvoted it since it might be useful for future readers. – Jan Schlorf Mar 28 '19 at 9:18
  • This answer might be useful, but the correct answer is adding @objc. The method signatures are correct. – Andrew Paul Simmons Apr 12 '19 at 15:03

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