2

I have a generic layout component that needs to lay out its children with a vertical space between them:

.container > * + * {
  margin-top: 1rem;
}

For reasons I won't go into, I can't guarantee the order the component styles are loaded in.

If a child component has had a reset to its margins applied, for example …

.child {
  margin: 0
}

… and it is loaded after the .container css, its styled will win out because a wildcard selector has no specificity, meaning both declarations are of equal weight (so the last declaration will win).

I don't want the container to know or care about what its children are (and I don't want to add a specific class to all the children).

Is there any way to increase the specificity of the first selector while leaving it generic (so it applies to any children).

6
  • use not() like this .container:not(#random_ID) > * + * related stackoverflow.com/a/50633333/8620333 / stackoverflow.com/a/49742059/8620333 Mar 28 '19 at 11:06
  • @Temani Afif: An ID is overkill. A simple type selector will suffice: .container:not(_) > * + *
    – BoltClock
    Mar 28 '19 at 15:33
  • @BoltClock true. I was more about thinking of a selector that will beat any other selector even with mutiple class,pseuo class. Mar 28 '19 at 16:02
  • @TemaniAfif - If that's the goal, then this is exactly what !important is for. For all the concern that !important is the nuclear option, given the tight restriction of the selector, and the minimal declaration set, it's a pretty surgical strike.
    – Alohci
    Mar 28 '19 at 16:21
  • @Alohci indeed. I think we all are moving around and forgetting about !important which is the trivial and logical solution here. Mar 28 '19 at 16:27
2

A more elegant alternative (i.e. one that comes with the additional specificity you need without requiring specificity hacks) is

.container > :not(:first-child)

which is functionally equivalent to your original selector, with a specificity of (0, 2, 0) over the original's (0, 1, 0).

.container {
  margin: 1rem 0;
  border-style: solid;
}

/* 1 class, 1 pseudo-class -> specificity = (0, 2, 0) */
.container > :not(:first-child) {
  margin-top: 1rem;
}

/* 1 class                 -> specificity = (0, 1, 0) */
.child {
  margin: 0;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="child">Child</div>
  <div class="child">Child</div>
  <div class="child">Child</div>
</div>
<div class="container">
  <div class="child">Child</div>
  <div class="child">Child</div>
  <div class="child">Child</div>
</div>

1
  • Yet another pseudo-class-based alternative, albeit somewhat less elegant since its meaning is not spelled out in plain English as is the case with the one in my answer, is .container > :nth-child(n+2)
    – BoltClock
    Mar 28 '19 at 15:48
1

By adding the selector

.container > * + [class] 

You can get a more specific selector it seems for the margin rule.

You can also use the :not() rule as suggested by Temani Afif

.container, .container2, .container3 {
   background-color: goldenrod;
   border: 1px solid black;
   display: block;
   margin-bottom:50px;
}

.container > * + * {
  margin-top: 1rem;
}

.container2 > * + *,
.container2 > * + [class] {
  margin-top: 1rem;
}

.container3:not(#doyoudreamofelectricsheep) > * + * {
  margin-top: 1rem;
}


.child {
  margin: 0;
  height: 20px;
  background-color:red;
  color: black;
  
}

.foobar {
  height: 20px;
  background-color:black;
  color: white;
}
Without the "fix"
<section class="container2">
   <div class="foobar">
       foobar
   </div>
   <div class="child">
       child
   </div>
   <div class="foobar">
       foobar
   </div>
   <div class="child">
       child
   </div>
   <div class="foobar">
       foobar
   </div>
   <div class>
       just class
   </div>
</section>

With the [class] "fix"
<section class="container2">
   <div class="foobar">
       foobar
   </div>
   <div class="child">
       child
   </div>
   <div class="foobar">
       foobar
   </div>
   <div class="child">
       child
   </div>
   <div class="foobar">
       foobar
   </div>
   <div class>
       just class
   </div>
</section>

With the :not(#doyoudreamofelectricsheep) "fix"
<section class="container3">
   <div class="foobar">
       foobar
   </div>
   <div class="child">
       child
   </div>
   <div class="foobar">
       foobar
   </div>
   <div class="child">
       child
   </div>
   <div class="foobar">
       foobar
   </div>
   <div class>
       just class
   </div>
</section>

4
  • 1
    Thanks. This is interesting - you are using a 'class' attribute selector with no value. I wonder what the browser support is like for that. Seems like something a browser might choose to ignore. Mar 28 '19 at 12:36
  • No, they should all just obey it. The class attribute is something that is present or not. So it would ignore <div><div> but it would catch <div class><div> it's valid css. This way you can also select for <div data-some-custom-attribute> with [data-some-custom-attribute] {color: red;}. I use it constantly and all mobile browsers and desktop browsers i've tested in, even the old ones support this. I added an example in the snippet. Mar 28 '19 at 12:46
  • 1
    OK. So it acts as a switch. That makes sense. I guess the only disadvantage with your approach is that it requires the child to have at least one class, but that's pretty much a given. Mar 28 '19 at 12:58
  • you can also use the :not() hack. it really is up to you and the rest of your codebase what will help more ensuring you get the correct selector. Also, you notice I implemented the dual selection with the comma separating the two conditions for matching. .container > * + *, .container * + [class] which means it selects those without and with class. Mar 28 '19 at 12:59

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