5

Is there a difference between a format string with the $ included?

%1d vs %1$d

I noticed that in the app code we have both and both seems to work ok.

or by the way using %1d to %2d vs %1$d to %2$d

5

%d - just display number

int first = 10;
System.out.printf("%d", first);
// output:
// 10

%1d - display number with information how much space should be "reserved" (at least one)

int first = 10;
System.out.printf("->%1d<-", first);
// output:
// ->10<-

%9d - reserve "9" chars (if number will be shorter - put spaces there) and align to right

int first = 10;
System.out.printf("->%9d<-", first);
// output:
// ->       10<-
//   123456789

%-9d - same as above but align to LEFT (this minus is important)

int first = 10;
System.out.printf("->%-9d<-", first);
// output:
// ->10       <-
//   123456789

%1$d - use (in format) position of the element from varargs (so you can REUSE elements instead of passing them two times)

int first = 10;
int second = 20;
System.out.printf("%1$d %2$d %1$d", first, second);
// output:
// 10 20 10

%1$9d - mix two of them. Get first parameter (1$) and reserve nine chars (%9d)

int first = 10;
System.out.printf("->%1$9d<-", first);
// output:
// ->       10<-
//   123456789
1

see java.util.Formatter ...it's called "explicit argument indices".

while referring to 1 single index, this makes no difference, because the order cannot be changed. the most common use might be, to substitute twice within the same string, while passing one argument.

the full pattern looks alike this:

%[argument_index$][flags][width][.precision]conversion
8
  • I don't understand you, can you give an example? – htafoya Mar 28 '19 at 18:55
  • @htafoya in the short-form, it's % position (which is a 1 based index) then $ and the data-type... where the position refers to the order of arguments, which follows the string, eg. when using String.format(). the linked documentation has various examples, in short and long form. – Martin Zeitler Mar 28 '19 at 19:09
  • I understand the % part, but I don't get why the $ is needed, i have used with and without the $ indistinctly. The link doesn't give any explanation of its use. – htafoya Mar 28 '19 at 19:13
  • @htafoya the full pattern explains it... % indicates the beginning of the string substitution and the $ terminates the argument index. – Martin Zeitler Mar 28 '19 at 19:15
  • 1
    @htafoya well, you've edited the initial question. without the $ as terminator for the argument index, it seems to be interpreted as the width parameter; as your example output suggests. I wasn't aware before that it's optional; so I've learned something, too. – Martin Zeitler Mar 28 '19 at 22:10
1

For anyone with the same question: THEY ARE NOT THE SAME

for the example posted:

%1d to %2d vs %1$d to %2$d

As Martin shared, the format pattern is:

%[argument_index$][flags][width][.precision]conversion

By not placing the $, the regex uses the %1, %2 and so on for the following regex arguments.

flags needs some specific values, so the 1 and 2 are being used as the width argument, which specifies the minimum width. If you continued with the same pattern you would end up with something as:

String.format("Hello: '%1d' '%2d' '%3d' '%4d'", 1, 2, 3, 4);
==> Hello: '1' ' 2' '  3' '   4'

Of course, as the width argument is being used, the %number won't represent the argument order as desired:

String.format("Hello: '%4d' '%3d' '%2d' '%1d'", 1, 2, 3, 4);
    ==> Hello: '   1' '  2' ' 3' '4'

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