3

I am creating a Dictionary of events and I want to declare those events inside the initialization of that dictionary instead of declaring them somewhere else and placing the links to the dictionary.

    static event EventDelegate Event1;
    static event EventDelegate Event2;
    static event EventDelegate Event3;

    public enum EventTypes
    {
        Event1, 
        Event2,
        Event3,
    }

    public static Dictionary<EventTypes, EventDelegate> events = new Dictionary<EventTypes, EventDelegate>
    {
        {EventTypes.Event1, Event1},
        {EventTypes.Event2, Event2},
        {EventTypes.Event3, Event3},
    };

So I want to do something like that:

{EventTypes.Event1, new event EventDelegate Event1}

Is that possible?

  • Events (i.e., declared by using the event keyword) are type members. In the same manner as you cannot put/declare fields or properties themselves as dictionary values, you cannot put/declare events themselves as dictionary values What problem are you actually trying to solve with this approach? It smells rather like a XY Problem. What would be the purpose of that enum anyway? (What would be the benefit of writing/using events[EventTypes.Event1].Invoke() compared to using the event directly like Event1.Invoke()?) – user2819245 Mar 30 '19 at 14:04
  • 1
    What about something like events.Add(EventTypes.Event1, (s, e) => Event1(s, e)) ? – Kevin Gosse Mar 30 '19 at 14:04
  • I am trying to reduce the amount of duplicate code: as you can see, adding a new event takes 3 actions for me: the actual event declaration, the new enum item and the dictionary item, containing links to both. And I need that dictionary to easily access static events from other classes by their type from the enum – Nidere Mar 30 '19 at 14:10
  • You are not reducing the amount of code. Why would you need the enum? You can easily access the events directly just fine without needing an enum (i mean, if you can easily access the enum from other classes, you can also as easily directly acess the events from other classes, which renders the enum as just being some redundant thing...) Avoiding the enum and the dictionary gets rid of that duplicate code. – user2819245 Mar 30 '19 at 14:15
  • @Nidere - Are you hoping to pass around the dictionary to allow code to subscribe to the events? – Enigmativity Apr 1 '19 at 2:43
5

How about wrapping the events?

class MyEventWrapper
{
    public event EventDelegate Handlers;

    public void Raise(object sender, EventArgs args)
    {
        Handlers?.Invoke(sender, args);
    }
}

//

Dictionary<EventTypes, MyEventWrapper> eventMap = new Dictionary<EventTypes, MyEventWrapper>
{
    { EventTypes.Event1, new MyEventWrapper() },
    { EventTypes.Event2, new MyEventWrapper() },
};

//

eventMap[EventTypes.Event1].Handlers += (s, a) => { };
eventMap[EventTypes.Event2].Handlers += (s, a) => { };

//

eventMap[EventTypes.Event1].Raise(this, new EventArgs());
  • 3
    Not only have your solution solved the problem with declaring events, but it also allowed me to populate the dictionary with a single "foreach" loop through the enum. So now I can create new events just by adding their name to the enum! That's just fantastic, thank you so much! – Nidere Mar 30 '19 at 14:42
0

If you define your dictionary like this:

public delegate void EventDelegate(object data);

public static Dictionary<EventTypes, EventDelegate> Events =
    new Dictionary<EventTypes, EventDelegate>
    {
        { EventTypes.Event1, (EventDelegate)((_) => { }) },
        { EventTypes.Event2, (EventDelegate)((_) => { }) },
        { EventTypes.Event3, (EventDelegate)((_) => { }) },
    };

public enum EventTypes
{
    Event1,
    Event2,
    Event3,
}

Then this code works a treat:

Events[EventTypes.Event1] += (object data) => Console.WriteLine($"Event1 (1): {data}");
Events[EventTypes.Event1] += (object data) => Console.WriteLine($"Event1 (2): {data}");
Events[EventTypes.Event2] += (object data) => Console.WriteLine($"Event2: {data}");

Events[EventTypes.Event1]("A");
Events[EventTypes.Event2]("B");
Events[EventTypes.Event3]("C");

The output I get is:

Event1 (1): A
Event1 (2): A
Event2: B

You are then clearly declaring those events inside the initialization of the dictionary.

0

You could declare an empty bodied delegate with the signature of your EventDelegate, and use it for the initialization of the dictionary items.

public delegate void EventDelegate(object data);
public static readonly EventDelegate EventDelegateEmptyBody = (_) => { };

public static Dictionary<EventTypes, EventDelegate> Events = new Dictionary<EventTypes, EventDelegate>
{
    {EventTypes.Event1, EventDelegateEmptyBody},
    {EventTypes.Event2, EventDelegateEmptyBody},
    {EventTypes.Event3, EventDelegateEmptyBody},
};

The downside is that this empty method will be invoked every time an event is raised, so you'll lose some performance. The upside is that you will not need to check if the delegate is empty before invoking it. It will never be empty.

Instead of an empty method you could have a method that actually do something, like logging the raising of an event.


Sample code demonstrating the usage of the Events dictionary:

Events[EventTypes.Event1] += (object data) =>
{
    Console.WriteLine($"Event1 first handler: {data}");
};
Events[EventTypes.Event1] += (object data) =>
{
    Console.WriteLine($"Event1 second handler: {data}");
};
Events[EventTypes.Event2] += (object data) =>
{
    Console.WriteLine($"Event2 handler: {data}");
};

Events[EventTypes.Event1].Invoke("test1");
Events[EventTypes.Event2].Invoke("test2");
Events[EventTypes.Event3].Invoke("test3");

Console output:

Event1 first handler: test1
Event1 second handler: test1
Event2 handler: test2

Update: It seems that the empty bodied delegate is redundant. The Events dictionary can be initialized with null values, and works just fine.

public static Dictionary<EventTypes, EventDelegate> Events = new Dictionary<EventTypes, EventDelegate>
{
    {EventTypes.Event1, null},
    {EventTypes.Event2, null},
    {EventTypes.Event3, null},
};

The only difference is that we must check for null before raising the events (the null conditional operator makes it easy).

Events[EventTypes.Event1]?.Invoke("test1");
Events[EventTypes.Event2]?.Invoke("test2");
Events[EventTypes.Event3]?.Invoke("test3");
  • How does this answer the question? – Enigmativity Mar 31 '19 at 23:03
  • @Enigmativity the above is a direct answer to the question: "how do I declare events inside the initialization of a dictionary". The questioner wants to get rid of the static declarations of the events. – Theodor Zoulias Apr 1 '19 at 0:21
  • The OP asked "I want to declare those events inside the initialization of that dictionary instead of declaring them somewhere else". – Enigmativity Apr 1 '19 at 1:50
  • The OP provided an example of what he wanted: {EventTypes.Event1, new event EventDelegate Event1}. I believe that my answer is as close to this as possible. – Theodor Zoulias Apr 1 '19 at 1:56
  • He specifically wanted to not declare them elsewhere. I'm just saying. – Enigmativity Apr 1 '19 at 2:05

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