1

When I add a C++ type as an Objective-C ivar, I get the full name of that type included, as a string:

@interface Test {
    std::vector<int> _vector;
    std::unordered_map<int, std::vector<std::string>> _map;
}

@end

@implementation Test
@end

Results in:

.L__unnamed_2:
        .asciz  "_vector"

.L__unnamed_3:
        .asciz  "{vector<int, std::allocator<int> >=\"_M_impl\"{_Vector_impl=\"_M_start\"^i\"_M_finish\"^i\"_M_end_of_storage\"^i}}"

__objc_ivar_offset_value_Test._vector:
        .long   0                       # 0x0

.L__unnamed_4:
        .asciz  "_map"

.L__unnamed_5:
        .asciz  "{unordered_map<int, std::vector<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char>, std::allocator<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char> > >, std::hash<int>, std::equal_to<int>, std::allocator<std::pair<const int, std::vector<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char>, std::allocator<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char> > > > > >=\"_M_h\"{_Hashtable<int, std::pair<const int, std::vector<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char>, std::allocator<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char> > > >, std::allocator<std::pair<const int, std::vector<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char>, std::allocator<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char> > > > >, std::__detail::_Select1st, std::equal_to<int>, std::hash<int>, std::__detail::_Mod_range_hashing, std::__detail::_Default_ranged_hash, std::__detail::_Prime_rehash_policy, std::__detail::_Hashtable_traits<false, false, true> >=\"_M_buckets\"^^{_Hash_node_base}\"_M_bucket_count\"Q\"_M_before_begin\"{_Hash_node_base=\"_M_nxt\"^{_Hash_node_base}}\"_M_element_count\"Q\"_M_rehash_policy\"{_Prime_rehash_policy=\"_M_max_load_factor\"f\"_M_next_resize\"Q}\"_M_single_bucket\"^{_Hash_node_base}}}"

Compiler Explorer link—note that I'm using -Os.

The latter one, using std::unordered_map, is about 1kb. What is the purpose of this, and can I get rid of it?

1

That information is required for the type-encoding used by the Objective-C runtime, and is part of how dynamic dispatch works. It's retrievable by interrogating the runtime:

Ivar *ivars = class_copyIvarList([Test class], NULL);
printf("%s\n", ivar_getTypeEncoding(ivars[1]));
free(ivars); ivars = NULL;

In order to eliminate it, you would need to avoid placing C++ types directly in the ObjC object. You can somewhat reduce the verbosity by boxing:

class Box {
    std::vector<int> _vector;
    std::unordered_map<int, std::vector<std::string> > *_map;
};

@interface Test: NSObject {
    Box box;
}
@end

Yields

{Box="_vector"{vector<int, std::__1::allocator<int> 
>="__begin_"^i"__end_"^i"__end_cap_"{__compressed_pair<int *, 
std::__1::allocator<int> >="__value_"^i}}"_map"^{unordered_map<int, 
std::__1::vector<std::__1::basic_string<char>, 
std::__1::allocator<std::__1::basic_string<char> > >, std::__1::hash<int>, 
std::__1::equal_to<int>, std::__1::allocator<std::__1::pair<const int, 
std::__1::vector<std::__1::basic_string<char>, 
std::__1::allocator<std::__1::basic_string<char> > > > > >}}

And a pointer to a box is a bit smaller:

^{Box={vector<int, std::__1::allocator<int> >=^i^i{__compressed_pair<int *,
std::__1::allocator<int> >=^i}}^{unordered_map<int,
std::__1::vector<std::__1::basic_string<char>, 
std::__1::allocator<std::__1::basic_string<char> > >, std::__1::hash<int>,
std::__1::equal_to<int>, std::__1::allocator<std::__1::pair<const int, 
std::__1::vector<std::__1::basic_string<char>, 
std::__1::allocator<std::__1::basic_string<char> > > > > >}}

And of course you can go further by making the box a void * and casting as needed, or possibly by hiding it behind a simpler C++ type and a pimpl (I haven't tried that approach to see if it works). But if you put C++ (or anything else) directly in an ObjC ivar, it has to store the name of the type for the runtime.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.