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I am attempting to create some code with C programming that can show a number to a certain power with both values specified by the user. I want to use pow for the first part and a while loop for the second. However, I've confronted an error with this current code that I cannot seem to get rid of.

Here is ther error that I am unfamiliar with:

error: invalid operands to binary * (have ‘int (*)(int,  int)’ and ‘int’)
       result2 = result2 * base;

I've tried looking into other questions with the same error, but they differ so much that I cannot understand.

I've tried researching into "long" but I have not been experienced with it yet through my C textbook, so I would like to refrain from using it if possible.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int result2(int base, int exponent);

int main(void)
{
    double base;
    double exponent;
    double result1;

    puts("Please enter a value as the base and another as the exponent.");
    scanf("%lf%lf", &base, &exponent);

    result1 = pow(base, exponent);

    printf("Library solution: %lf\n", result1);

    printf("My solution: %d\n", result2(base, exponent));
}

int result2(int base, int exponent)
{
    int i;


    for(i=1; i<=exponent; i++)
    {
        result2 = result2 * base;
    }
    return;
}

I would like to be able to calculate the equation properly using both methods with the user's values. However, with this error, I just cannot seem to get past and achieve that. Thank you.

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  • Is result2 supposed to be a function of an integer? Commented Apr 2, 2019 at 2:28
  • 1
    In Visual Basic, you set the return value of a function by assigning a variable sharing the same name as the function. C doesn't work that way. (Or C++, C#, Java, etc)
    – Ben Voigt
    Commented Apr 2, 2019 at 3:06

2 Answers 2

2
int result2(int base, int exponent)
{
    int i;

    for(i=1; i<=exponent; i++)
    {
        result2 = result2 * base;
    }
    return;
}

result2 is the name of your function. Rather than using it like a variable that can accumulate the results of the loop, you should create a variable to do that job. Then return the value of the variable at the end.

int result2(int base, int exponent)
{
    int i;
    int result = 1;

    for(i=1; i<=exponent; i++)
    {
        result = result * base;
    }
    return result;
}

Better yet, give the function a different name. result2 sounds like the name of a variable. The function should be named something that indicates what it does. Since pow is taken, how about power?

int power(int base, int exponent)
{
    int result = 1;

    for (int i=1; i<=exponent; i++)
    {
        result *= base;
    }

    return result;
}

Some other small improvements are declaring int i inside the for loop, and using result *= base as shorthand for result = result * base.

0
0

i made a few modifications to your code.

1) Renamed funtion result2 to my_exp. result2 sound like a variable.

2) Modify types for funtion my_exp to int to be consistent with the variables types of main.

3) Add a variable result in my_exp to store the partial result of for loop.

4) Declared i inside for declaration.

5) call pow and my_exp inside printf and remove result1 is not necesary anymore.

6) Changed how result is calculed to a more compact way.

most of those changes are cosmetic except for types changes.

int my_exp(int base, int exponent);

int main(void)
{
    int base;
    int exponent;

    puts("Please enter a value as the base and another as the exponent.");
    scanf("%i", &base);
    scanf("%i", &exponent);

    printf("Library solution: %i\n", pow(base, exponent));
    printf("My solution: %i\n", my_exp(base, exponent));
}

int my_exp(int base, int exponent)
{
    //int i;
    int result;
    result = 1;

    for(int i=1; i<=exponent; i++)
    {
        result *= base;
    }
    return result;
}
2
  • 1
    The function doesn't handle fractional exponents, so it would be better not to change the type of that parameter to double.
    – Ben Voigt
    Commented Apr 2, 2019 at 3:08
  • that is true, i edited my answer changing types to int Commented Apr 3, 2019 at 13:51

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