22

How does one stub a method in PHPUnit that is called by the class under test's constructor? The simple code below for example won't work because by the time I declare the stubbed method, the stub object has already been created and my method called, unstubbed.

Class to test:

class ClassA {
  private $dog;
  private $formatted;

  public function __construct($param1) { 
     $this->dog = $param1;       
     $this->getResultFromRemoteServer();
  }

  // Would normally be private, made public for stubbing
  public getResultFromRemoteServer() {
    $this->formatted = file_get_contents('http://whatever.com/index.php?'.$this->dog);
  }

  public getFormatted() {
    return ("The dog is a ".$this->formatted);
  }
}

Test code:

class ClassATest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase {
  public function testPoodle() {  
    $stub = $this->getMockBuilder('ClassA')
                 ->setMethods(array('getResultFromRemoteServer'))
                 ->setConstructorArgs(array('dog52'))
                 ->getMock();

    $stub->expects($this->any())
         ->method('getResultFromRemoteServer')
         ->will($this->returnValue('Poodle'));

    $expected = 'This dog is a Poodle';
    $actual = $stub->getFormatted();
    $this->assertEquals($expected, $actual);
  }
}
14

The problem is not the stubbing of the method, but your class.

You are doing work in the constructor. In order to set the object into state, you fetch a remote file. But that step is not necessary, because the object doesn't need that data to be in a valid state. You dont need the result from the file before you actually call getFormatted.

You could defer loading:

class ClassA {
  private $dog;
  private $formatted;

  public function __construct($param1) { 
     $this->dog = $param1;       
  }
  protected getResultFromRemoteServer() {
    if (!$this->formatted) {
        $this->formatted = file_get_contents(
            'http://whatever.com/index.php?' . $this->dog
        );
    }
    return $this->formatted;
  }
  public getFormatted() {
    return ("The dog is a " . $this->getResultFromRemoteServer());
  }
}

so you are lazy loading the remote access to when it's actually needed. Now you dont need to stub getResultFromRemoteServer at all, but can stub getFormatted instead. You also won't need to open your API for the testing and make getResultFromRemoteServer public then.

On a sidenote, even if it's just an example, I would rewrite that class to read

class DogFinder
{
    protected $lookupUri;
    protected $cache = array();
    public function __construct($lookupUri)
    {
        $this->lookupUri = $lookupUri;
    }
    protected function findById($dog)
    {
        if (!isset($this->cache[$dog])) {
            $this->cache[$dog] = file_get_contents(
                urlencode($this->lookupUri . $dog)
            );
        }
        return $this->cache[$id];
    }
    public function getFormatted($dog, $format = 'This is a %s')
    {
        return sprintf($format, $this->findById($dog));
    }
}

Since it's a Finder, it might make more sense to actually have findById public now. Just keeping it protected because that's what you had in your example.


The other option would be to extend the Subject-Under-Test and replace the method getResultFromRemoteServer with your own implementation returning Poodle. This would mean you are not testing the actual ClassA, but a subclass of ClassA, but this is what happens when you use the Mock API anyway.

As of PHP7, you could utilize an Anonymous class like this:

public function testPoodle() {

    $stub = new class('dog52') extends ClassA {
      public function getResultFromRemoteServer() {
          return 'Poodle';
      }
    };

    $expected = 'This dog is a Poodle';
    $actual = $stub->getFormatted();
    $this->assertEquals($expected, $actual);
}

Before PHP7, you'd just write a regular class extending the Subject-Under-Test and use that instead of the Subject-Under-Test. Or use disableOriginalConstructor as shown elsewhere on this page.

  • I'm hearing you and I agree. The code above I just whipped up for the ease of illustration, but it reflects the code I'm working on. <continued on next comment, I keep on pressing Enter> – jontyc Apr 5 '11 at 7:26
  • 1
    I'll see how popping the remote call later fits in to the real code. It was just one of those situations where I didn't have a class originally because it wasn't needed, but added it because of ease of testing and mocking. – jontyc Apr 5 '11 at 7:33
  • @stebbo feel free to drop by the chat if you have any additional questions. – Gordon Apr 5 '11 at 7:35
  • This is NOT an answer to the original question AT ALL. "You should be doing Y instead and then you won't need to do X" is NOT an answer to "How do I do X?". – Szczepan Hołyszewski Mar 31 '17 at 14:46
  • @Szczepan true, but that is irrelevant because the alternative shown is cleaner and solved the OPs problem. – Gordon Mar 31 '17 at 15:19
47

Use disableOriginalConstructor() so that getMock() won't call the constructor. The name is a bit misleading because calling that method ends up passing false for $callOriginalConstructor. This allows you to set expectations on the returned mock before calling the constructor manually.

$stub = $this->getMockBuilder('ClassA')
             ->setMethods(array('getResultFromRemoteServer'))
             ->disableOriginalConstructor()
             ->getMock();
$stub->expects($this->any())
     ->method('getResultFromRemoteServer')
     ->will($this->returnValue('Poodle'));
$stub->__construct('dog52');
...
  • That sounds perfect. I'll probably restructure as Gordon suggested but I'll keep it in mind. Thanks again David. – jontyc Apr 5 '11 at 7:36
  • B-e-a-utiful! This exact issue caused a cascade of errors which I narrowed down to my mocked method not being called from the constructor. This answer solves @jontyc's (and my) question perfectly. Thank you! – Jess Telford Sep 20 '11 at 3:45
  • exactly what I'm find. – Édipo Costa Rebouças Dec 9 '16 at 13:48

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