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I have always wondered that since Qt uses almost every C++ feature in the standard and in a wonderful and an innovative way, and whenever it doesn't use a particular feature, it has a perfectly valid and applicable reason for not doing so. In that case, why is it that no Qt classes ever use the throw keyword and throw any exceptions? What is their rationale behind never requiring a try ... catch block in our Qt written code?

Personally, I myself don't like it much and never use it whether or not I'm working with Qt and always go with error codes and return values instead of throwing exception objects. But why don't I see a QException class in their documentation? What is the Qt developers viewpoint on this?

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    On a side note new can throw std::bad_alloc in most situations so don't get too comfortable if you want to write rugged code. Dec 4, 2012 at 14:46

3 Answers 3

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For historic reasons, mostly. Exception support in compilers took quite some time to mature. Citing Nokia's Tobias Hunger:

"When Qt was started exceptions were not available for all the compilers that needed to be supported by Qt. Today we are trying to keep the APIs consistent, so modules that have a history of not using exceptions will generally not get new code using exceptions added. You will notice exceptions are used in some of the new modules of Qt."

I think that sums it up pretty much.

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    I guess it is time to get adapted to the new times. Historical reasons cannot prevent us from using such a nice feature. Sep 21, 2015 at 7:24
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    One more reason from Qt official documentation: Qt itself will not throw exceptions. Instead, error codes are used. In addition, some classes have user visible error messages, for example QIODevice::errorString() or QSqlQuery::lastError(). This has historical and practical reasons - turning on exceptions can increase the library size by over 20%. Feb 1, 2016 at 20:39
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If you google for "qt exceptions" you will get lot of discussions about this topic. Here is an "official" answer:

When Qt was started exceptions were not available for all the compilers that needed to be supported by Qt. Today we are trying to keep the APIs consistent, so modules that have a history of not using exceptions will generally not get new code using exceptions added.

You will notice exceptions are used in some of the new modules of Qt.

If you look for exception in the index of assistant (i.e. in the Qt documentation) you will find some exception classes, e.g. QtConcurrent::Exception.

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You can read a nice, mostly civilized debate about exceptions here on the KDE devel mailinglist. Since KDE and QT are related I assume the same issues apply, which (if I read the thread correctly) can be summarized as:

  • Exceptions have performance issues depending on compiler.
  • Shielding users of the library from the obligation to use exceptions (by not throwing them from the library)
  • Issues around the spec for exceptions in C++
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    What performance issues? Bjarne seems to write that in his new book, it is almost no-op if it they do not occur, and if they do, it is maximum a function call overhead? Also, what issues in the spec? I did not understand the shielding part. Can you elaborate? Oct 23, 2013 at 18:01
  • hi @LaszloPapp, my points mostly become clear if you read the thread I link. Otherwise, I think the two higher rated answers might be more spot-on than mine. Oct 24, 2013 at 12:00
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    @Ipapp : Bjarne does not know all implementation issues... MinGW (the windows port of GCC) had big performance drop (25%) with exceptions enabled (even without using them in the code) a couple of years ago. It's moslty solved now, but clearly exceptions have been a problem for some time, even if the mainstream compilers (gcc under linux, msvc...) had no issues.
    – galinette
    Jun 1, 2016 at 13:44
  • Re: shielding. I assumed this to mean that users of Qt can rest assured that no exceptions will be thrown from the Qt code and so there is no need to ensure your own code will catch any such (unexpected) exceptions. So one less thing to worry about.
    – Will
    Sep 26, 2023 at 14:02

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