1

I'm aware of .let {} but the evaluated expression is inside a lambda expression which doesn't work too nice if you need to return something inside a method.

Example problematic code

fun method(): Int {
  if (anyObject != null) {
    val calculatedValue = anObject!!.awesome()
    val magicTrick = calculatedValue + randomMethodName()

    return magicTrick
  } 
  return false
}

Is there a better way than this

fun method(): Int {
  val tempObject = anObject
  if (tempObject != null {
    val calculatedValue = tempObject.awesome()
    val magicTrick = calculatedValue + randomMethodName()

    return magicTrick
  } else {
    return false
  }
}

Swift equivalent

fun method(): Int {
  if let tempObject = anObject {
    let calculatedValue = tempObject.awesome()
    let magicTrick = calculatedValue + randomMethodName()

    return magicTrick
  } else {
    return false
  }
}
1
  • The value returned by the lambda passed to let is returned by the let function itself. It should work nicely to return something.
    – Salem
    Apr 3, 2019 at 9:46

1 Answer 1

5

In fact, your swift code can be even simpler without if let

func method() -> Boolean { return anObject?.someBoolean ?? false }

If this is the actual method you want to implement, the kotlin equivalent is:

fun method() : Boolean = anObject?.someBoolean ?: false

If you need to compute the boolean from the property of the optional:

fun method() : Boolean = anObject?.someProperty?.let{functionThatReturnBoolean(it)} ?: false

.let{} returns the last line within its body, which can be useful in many cases.

someThing?.let{} will return null if someThing is null due to optional chaining.

?: is the default value operator equivalent to ?? in swift, which returns the value on rhs when its lhs is null.

5
  • I'll try to update the example with something more complex in order to illustrate my issue.
    – Warpzit
    Apr 3, 2019 at 9:44
  • I don't know any + operation which would return Boolean as your updated code means... but I assume you would do something on the property to return a Boolean, which is equivalent to functionThatReturnBoolean(it) in my updated answer.
    – Ricky Mo
    Apr 3, 2019 at 9:53
  • I guess the fact that .let{} returns its last line is what you want to know.
    – Ricky Mo
    Apr 3, 2019 at 10:09
  • Hmm yes I'll just experiment with that information :)
    – Warpzit
    Apr 3, 2019 at 10:20
  • So I had gotten into my head that the let would be evaluated as a lambda expression without a return. I was wrong. Thanks for the help.
    – Warpzit
    Apr 3, 2019 at 10:32

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