7

This code will print out 'Duo' even though $var is not a dynamic variable with a * twigil:

our $var="Duo";
sub sub1() {
    say $*var;
}

sub1();
#output is 'Duo'

Adding a unit package ABC; at the start gives a compile time error "Dynamic variable $*var not found":

unit package ABC;

our $var="Duo";
sub sub1() {
    say $*var;
}

sub1();
# compile time error

Adding a * twigil in this case makes the variable accessible.

Why the difference?

Edit 1:

Using my instead of our is a compile time error with or without a package, even though this would mean the same lexical scope in my understanding.

Are variables which are intended to be used dynamically, to be declared explicitly as such (like all the examples I can find). If so how does our allow the above to work? I'm confused.

Edit 2:

I think the following demonstrates why I'm confused:

our $var="non dynamic";   #1
{say $*var;}

our $*var="dynamic";      #2
{say $*var;}


#With #2 commented output is
#non dynamic
#non dynamic
#
#With #2 in place output becomes
#(Any)
#dynamic

In the first case (#2 commented) I'm accessing a non dynamic variable dynamically (twice).

In the second case the our $var variable is getting clobbered when the our $*var is declared and accessing same dynamic variable is resolving to two seperate variables.

  • 2
    The FQN name would be $*ABC::var, I guess. – jjmerelo Apr 3 at 11:15
  • 1
    @jjmerelo But dynamic variables cannot have package-like names, so $*ABC::var would be an illegal name – Håkon Hægland Apr 3 at 13:14
  • 1
    So if dynamic variables are not resolvable through a package name, is there any point to being able to declare them with our ? Am I missing the use case? – drclaw Apr 3 at 21:45
  • @drclaw "is there any point to being able to declare them with our" Not as far as I can see.. To me it seems like our $*var is equivalent to my $*var. – Håkon Hægland Apr 3 at 22:36
  • 1
    "In the second case the our $var variable is getting clobbered.." Actually $var is not clobbered, if you add a say $var after #1, it still prints "non dynamic" – Håkon Hægland Apr 4 at 15:09
6

Seems like dynamic variables are looked up in the GLOBAL name space. Thus the following works:

unit package ABC;

$GLOBAL::var="Duo";
sub sub1() {
    say $*var;
}
sub1();
#output is 'Duo'

The reason your first example works is that (according to the documentation):

The user's program starts in the GLOBAL package, so "our" declarations in the mainline code go into that package by default.

  • sub1() is in the same package ABC and is still accessible. Would not our $var also be directly accessible from within the same package without explicit namespace? I thought our was like my but adds an alias in the symbol table somehow. – drclaw Apr 3 at 21:31
  • 1
    "Would not our $var also be directly accessible from within the same package without explicit namespace?" Yes it is, but it is not the same variable as the dynamic variable our $*var. The one without the star, our $var, makes a lexical variable and also make $ABC::var accessible from other packages by using the fully qulified name. On the other hand our $*var declares a dynamic variable (not lexical); this variable will not be accessible from other packages using a fully qualified name. – Håkon Hægland Apr 3 at 21:45
  • 1
    I think I understand your example. However in my original code/question, I declared our $var (with no *) and then use it as a dynamic variable like say $*var; and I get the expected result. This is the bit I'm not following: how and why is our dynamic? (or not, and I'm just missing the point!) – drclaw Apr 3 at 21:54
  • 1
    "and I get the expected result" Yes that was because the code was running in the GLOBAL package and then our $var was put into the GLOBAL namespace (as I mentioned in my answer). My guess is that in the GLOBAL scope somehow our $*var is the same as our $var. So later when you do say $*var it would look up dynamic variables in the callers scopes until it comes back to the top most scope which is the GLOBAL scope. It then finds $*var here.. – Håkon Hægland Apr 3 at 22:03
  • 1
    Ok, thanks for your assistance! – drclaw Apr 3 at 22:10
6

Dynamic variable lookup conceptually happens in all dynamic scopes. Dynamic scopes are first PROCESS::, then GLOBAL:: and then whatever dynamic scopes that the program has.

So when you look up a dynamic variable, it will first look in all dynamic scopes from the current down. When it doesn't find it there, it will then look in GLOBAL::, and if not found, in PROCESS::.

For example, if you want to print something on STDOUT, it will look up the $*OUT dynamic variable. If you did not define one somewhere in your dynamic scopes, it will use the one from PROCESS:::

dd PROCESS::<$OUT>;
# IO::Handle element = IO::Handle.new(path => IO::Special.new("<STDOUT>")...)
  • I think part of my confusion comes from the twigil being part of the variable name. So our $*var and our $var would be different variables in my thinking. Why look for $var when asked to find $*var – drclaw Apr 4 at 13:52
  • 3
    I think the reasoning was that the * twigil indicates a way to look up, rather than a type. Personally, I consider this a wart, similar to class A { has $a = 42; method b() { $!a } }; dd A.new.b; # 42, where you can specify a private attribute without the ! sigil. – Elizabeth Mattijsen Apr 4 at 15:30

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