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What is the difference between a static Dictionary field, a (static or non-static?) ConcurrentDictionary field, and a dependency injected singleton service in a controller in ASP.NET Core?

A static dictionary.

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private static IDictionary<string, string> _dictionary =
        new Dictionary<string, string>();
}

A (static or non-static?) ConcurrentDictionary.

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private IDictionary<string, string> _dictionary =
        new ConcurrentDictionary<string, string>();
}

A Dictionary property inside a dependency injected singleton service.

// Startup.cs
services.AddSingleton<HomeService>(); // Dependency injection

// HomeService.cs
public class HomeService
{
    public IDictionary<string, string> MyDictionary { get; set; } =
        new Dictionary<string, string>();
}

// HomeController.cs
public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private HomeService _service;

    public HomeController(HomeService service)
    {
        _service = service;
    }

    public IActionResult Index()
    {
        _service.MyDictionary.Add("foo", "bar");
        return Ok();
    }
}

What is the difference? How are they different from each other? Is any approach favored over the other?

  • I depends entirely on what you're actually doing. However, statics, in general, should be avoided. That said, the point of injecting a service doesn't have anything to do with this. That dictionary represents something. It's domain logic that's almost assuredly not controller logic. As such, how that dictionary is utilized and its very existence is something that should be factored out of the controller into a class. – Chris Pratt Apr 3 at 13:56
  • My two cents: Static will be hanging during the whole app lifecycle.. so you should avoid it They can cause memory leaks (it becomes what's known as a A GC Root), The nonstatic is okay - It will be gone once your controller is deallocated, since it's a field inside it. Maybe this helps: michaelscodingspot.com/… – jpgrassi Apr 3 at 14:11
  • @jpgrassi But I want to share the dictionary among different HTTP requests. Each HTTP request creates a new instance of the controller. – Fred Apr 3 at 16:55
  • @HenkHolterman No. The difference between static dictionary field and a dictionary inside a service obtained as a singleton. – Fred Apr 3 at 16:56
  • 1
    Hum.. I would go with another approach then. Have you considered something like Redis? I wouldn't share state like this in a static dictionary.. it's not scalable especially if you have multiple instances of your app running, say like behind a LB. – jpgrassi Apr 3 at 18:47
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As pointed out by jpgrassi in the comment, having a static field inside a Controller is not a good idea due to that it does not scale across multiple instances of the application running behind a load balancer.

The proper way to do is in ASP.NET Core is to use distributed caching with the IDistributedCache interface which allows different implementations such as in-memory or Redis, etc.

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private readonly IDistributedCache _cache;

    public HomeController(IDistributedCache cache)
    {
        _cache = cache;
    }

    public Task<IActionResult> Index()
    {
        var currentTimeUTC = DateTime.UtcNow.ToString();
        byte[] encodedCurrentTimeUTC = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(currentTimeUTC);
        var options = new DistributedCacheEntryOptions()
            .SetSlidingExpiration(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(20));
        await _cache.SetAsync("cachedTimeUTC", encodedCurrentTimeUTC, options);

        return Ok();
    }
}

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