7

Let's consider this specific case in which I want to pass a set of some object's statuses. For convenience and flexibility (or perhaps arbitrarily) I chose to use binary statuses which will be then concatenated using bitwise or "|" before I pass them around:

status_a = 0b1
status_b = 0b10
status_c = 0b100

statuses_to_pass = status_a | status_c  # 0b101

Then I realized that in this case I could use addition arithmetic operator "+" as well:

status_a | status_c == status_a + status_c  
#             0b101 == 0b101  -->  True

Of course this is true when statuses are positive powers of two; there are also some other caveats like:

status_a | status_c | status_c == status_a + status_c + status_c  
#                        0b101 == 0b1001  -->  False

But let's assume I stay within the limitations - are there any reasons why bitwise operator would be better than arithmetic one? Something under the Python's hood? Which one is faster? Or maybe there are any other side effects I didn't think of?

  • 6
    Use whichever you think will be clearer to whoever is reading the code. | makes it more obvious you are dealing with bit fields. – khelwood Apr 3 '19 at 15:01
  • @khelwood A valid point, but I am still interested in more technical insight - not necessarily for practical purposes but more out of curiosity. – Stanowczo Apr 3 '19 at 16:43
5
+50
0

Experiments with timeit suggest that adding is faster in these cases:

import timeit
import statistics
times = {"+": [], "|": []}

for x in range(10):
    for y in range(x+1, 10):
        for op in "+|":
            t = timeit.timeit(stmt="x {} y".format(op), setup="x=2**{};y=2**{}".format(x, y))
            times[op].append(t)


statistics.mean(times["+"])  # 0.029464346377385986
statistics.mean(times["|"])  # 0.04432822428643703
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    As the length of the arguments (in bits) grows and exceed the maximum length that the ALU can handle natively, or-ing becomes faster. – Leon Jul 25 '19 at 16:48
  • Is there a way to check my CPU's ALU native length limit? Other than guessing based on empirical results? But indeed when I used bigger numbers in the above script, or-ing became faster... – Stanowczo Jul 26 '19 at 7:36
  • ALU native length limit is same as CPU word length (32 bit or 64 bit for most consumer processors), if I am not wrong. – SilentGuy Jul 31 '19 at 15:47
  • @SilentGuy: Wider vector registers certainly exist and are used in (some) bigint algorithms. – Davis Herring Aug 1 '19 at 0:46
  • I get 0.026/0.034 with Python 2 (with int; 0.056/0.058 with long) and 0.041/0.056 with Python 3. – Davis Herring Aug 1 '19 at 3:27
5
0

When we take a further look at the Python source code, we notice that the operators call different functions. The addition operator calls binary_op1() while the OR operator calls binary_op().

Python addition operator (line 955)

PyObject *
PyNumber_Add(PyObject *v, PyObject *w)
{
    PyObject *result = binary_op1(v, w, NB_SLOT(nb_add));
    if (result == Py_NotImplemented) {
        PySequenceMethods *m = v->ob_type->tp_as_sequence;
        Py_DECREF(result);
        if (m && m->sq_concat) {
            return (*m->sq_concat)(v, w);
        }
        result = binop_type_error(v, w, "+");
    }
    return result;
}

Python OR operator (line 941)

#define BINARY_FUNC(func, op, op_name) \
    PyObject * \
    func(PyObject *v, PyObject *w) { \
        return binary_op(v, w, NB_SLOT(op), op_name); \
    }

BINARY_FUNC(PyNumber_Or, nb_or, "|")

We might think that the OR operator will be faster than the addition operator but the OR operator has more code to execute. In Python the OR operator is slower because binary_op() calls binary_op1().

binary_op (line 834)

static PyObject *
binary_op(PyObject *v, PyObject *w, const int op_slot, const char *op_name)
{
    PyObject *result = binary_op1(v, w, op_slot);
    if (result == Py_NotImplemented) {
        Py_DECREF(result);

        if (op_slot == NB_SLOT(nb_rshift) &&
            PyCFunction_Check(v) &&
            strcmp(((PyCFunctionObject *)v)->m_ml->ml_name, "print") == 0)
        {
            PyErr_Format(PyExc_TypeError,
                "unsupported operand type(s) for %.100s: "
                "'%.100s' and '%.100s'. Did you mean \"print(<message>, "
                "file=<output_stream>)\"?",
                op_name,
                v->ob_type->tp_name,
                w->ob_type->tp_name);
            return NULL;
        }

        return binop_type_error(v, w, op_name);
    }
    return result;
}

binary_op1 (line 785)

static PyObject *
binary_op1(PyObject *v, PyObject *w, const int op_slot)
{
    PyObject *x;
    binaryfunc slotv = NULL;
    binaryfunc slotw = NULL;

    if (v->ob_type->tp_as_number != NULL)
        slotv = NB_BINOP(v->ob_type->tp_as_number, op_slot);
    if (w->ob_type != v->ob_type &&
        w->ob_type->tp_as_number != NULL) {
        slotw = NB_BINOP(w->ob_type->tp_as_number, op_slot);
        if (slotw == slotv)
            slotw = NULL;
    }
    if (slotv) {
        if (slotw && PyType_IsSubtype(w->ob_type, v->ob_type)) {
            x = slotw(v, w);
            if (x != Py_NotImplemented)
                return x;
            Py_DECREF(x); /* can't do it */
            slotw = NULL;
        }
        x = slotv(v, w);
        if (x != Py_NotImplemented)
            return x;
        Py_DECREF(x); /* can't do it */
    }
    if (slotw) {
        x = slotw(v, w);
        if (x != Py_NotImplemented)
            return x;
        Py_DECREF(x); /* can't do it */
    }
    Py_RETURN_NOTIMPLEMENTED;
}

The snippets above belong to abstract.c from the CPython project on GitHub.

The most significant difference is in the implementation in longobject.c. The Addition works much faster and more efficient with smaller numbers. The bigger the numbers get, the faster the OR operator becomes compared to the addition operator.

x_add (line 3020)

static PyLongObject *
x_add(PyLongObject *a, PyLongObject *b)
{
    Py_ssize_t size_a = Py_ABS(Py_SIZE(a)), size_b = Py_ABS(Py_SIZE(b));
    PyLongObject *z;
    Py_ssize_t i;
    digit carry = 0;

    /* Ensure a is the larger of the two: */
    if (size_a < size_b) {
        { PyLongObject *temp = a; a = b; b = temp; }
        { Py_ssize_t size_temp = size_a;
            size_a = size_b;
            size_b = size_temp; }
    }
    z = _PyLong_New(size_a+1);
    if (z == NULL)
        return NULL;
    for (i = 0; i < size_b; ++i) {
        carry += a->ob_digit[i] + b->ob_digit[i];
        z->ob_digit[i] = carry & PyLong_MASK;
        carry >>= PyLong_SHIFT;
    }
    for (; i < size_a; ++i) {
        carry += a->ob_digit[i];
        z->ob_digit[i] = carry & PyLong_MASK;
        carry >>= PyLong_SHIFT;
    }
    z->ob_digit[i] = carry;
    return long_normalize(z);
}

long_bitwise (line 4423)

static PyObject *
long_bitwise(PyLongObject *a,
             char op,  /* '&', '|', '^' */
             PyLongObject *b)
{
    int nega, negb, negz;
    Py_ssize_t size_a, size_b, size_z, i;
    PyLongObject *z;

    /* Bitwise operations for negative numbers operate as though
       on a two's complement representation.  So convert arguments
       from sign-magnitude to two's complement, and convert the
       result back to sign-magnitude at the end. */

    /* If a is negative, replace it by its two's complement. */
    size_a = Py_ABS(Py_SIZE(a));
    nega = Py_SIZE(a) < 0;
    if (nega) {
        z = _PyLong_New(size_a);
        if (z == NULL)
            return NULL;
        v_complement(z->ob_digit, a->ob_digit, size_a);
        a = z;
    }
    else
        /* Keep reference count consistent. */
        Py_INCREF(a);

    /* Same for b. */
    size_b = Py_ABS(Py_SIZE(b));
    negb = Py_SIZE(b) < 0;
    if (negb) {
        z = _PyLong_New(size_b);
        if (z == NULL) {
            Py_DECREF(a);
            return NULL;
        }
        v_complement(z->ob_digit, b->ob_digit, size_b);
        b = z;
    }
    else
        Py_INCREF(b);

    /* Swap a and b if necessary to ensure size_a >= size_b. */
    if (size_a < size_b) {
        z = a; a = b; b = z;
        size_z = size_a; size_a = size_b; size_b = size_z;
        negz = nega; nega = negb; negb = negz;
    }

    /* JRH: The original logic here was to allocate the result value (z)
       as the longer of the two operands.  However, there are some cases
       where the result is guaranteed to be shorter than that: AND of two
       positives, OR of two negatives: use the shorter number.  AND with
       mixed signs: use the positive number.  OR with mixed signs: use the
       negative number.
    */
    switch (op) {
    case '^':
        negz = nega ^ negb;
        size_z = size_a;
        break;
    case '&':
        negz = nega & negb;
        size_z = negb ? size_a : size_b;
        break;
    case '|':
        negz = nega | negb;
        size_z = negb ? size_b : size_a;
        break;
    default:
        PyErr_BadArgument();
        return NULL;
    }

    /* We allow an extra digit if z is negative, to make sure that
       the final two's complement of z doesn't overflow. */
    z = _PyLong_New(size_z + negz);
    if (z == NULL) {
        Py_DECREF(a);
        Py_DECREF(b);
        return NULL;
    }

    /* Compute digits for overlap of a and b. */
    switch(op) {
    case '&':
        for (i = 0; i < size_b; ++i)
            z->ob_digit[i] = a->ob_digit[i] & b->ob_digit[i];
        break;
    case '|':
        for (i = 0; i < size_b; ++i)
            z->ob_digit[i] = a->ob_digit[i] | b->ob_digit[i];
        break;
    case '^':
        for (i = 0; i < size_b; ++i)
            z->ob_digit[i] = a->ob_digit[i] ^ b->ob_digit[i];
        break;
    default:
        PyErr_BadArgument();
        return NULL;
    }

    /* Copy any remaining digits of a, inverting if necessary. */
    if (op == '^' && negb)
        for (; i < size_z; ++i)
            z->ob_digit[i] = a->ob_digit[i] ^ PyLong_MASK;
    else if (i < size_z)
        memcpy(&z->ob_digit[i], &a->ob_digit[i],
               (size_z-i)*sizeof(digit));

    /* Complement result if negative. */
    if (negz) {
        Py_SIZE(z) = -(Py_SIZE(z));
        z->ob_digit[size_z] = PyLong_MASK;
        v_complement(z->ob_digit, z->ob_digit, size_z+1);
    }

    Py_DECREF(a);
    Py_DECREF(b);
    return (PyObject *)maybe_small_long(long_normalize(z));
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I don't think the difference between binary_op and binary_op1 is the sole reason for the performance difference. I have tried other operations that call binary_op (e.g. - and &) and most of them run faster than |. The run times of + and - are similar despite the latter calls binary_op. – GZ0 Jul 28 '19 at 14:36
  • I have just made a benchmark and it seems that the subtraction is even faster than the addition. But it changes the bigger the numbers get. You can find the implementation on GitHub : longobject.c. (Addition: Line 3108; Bitwise operators: Line 4424) github.com/python/cpython/blob/v3.6.7/Objects/longobject.c – batthomas Jul 29 '19 at 20:13
  • Thanks for the pointers to the source. It is not easy to identify where the performance bottleneck is actually located at the first glance though. – GZ0 Jul 29 '19 at 22:07
  • 2
    That's for working with abstract numbers, not just ints. For int, those can be found here. Ultimately, | runs this and + would run this. – Artyer Jul 30 '19 at 22:00
2
0

Since Python 3.6 you want to use Flag enums:

from enum import Flag, auto

class Status(Flag):
    R = auto()
    W = auto()
    X = auto()
    FULL = R | W | X
    READONLY = R | X

a = Status.R
b = Status.W
c = Status.X

print(list(Status))
print(a,b,c)

perms1 = a | b | c
print(perms1)

# removing W permission
readonly_perms = perms1 & ~Status.W
print(readonly_perms == Status.READONLY)

print(Status.W in readonly_perms)

full_perms = readonly_perms | Status.FULL
print(full_perms == Status.FULL)

Outputs:

[<Status.R: 1>, <Status.W: 2>, <Status.X: 4>, <Status.FULL: 7>, <Status.READONLY: 5>]
Status.R Status.W Status.X
Status.FULL
True
True
True

Check the Flag enum docs here

A good reason to not use non-bitwise operations with bit operands and bitmasks is that you can easily change other bits as a side effect without noticing.

| improve this answer | |
  • Interesting, but that does not really answer the question since the example is out of the scope. – Stanowczo Aug 1 '19 at 11:19
  • @Stanowczo, the question directed everyone to performance discussions, while in my opinion one should go with bitwise operators, even if not using Flags, I think it's safer because of readability. Otherwise you can end up doing math with magic numbers. And summing one to an active bit disables it, but carries to the left as you said, and so on... I addressed the question by a different angle indeed. – progmatico Aug 1 '19 at 22:03
1
0

I've been playing with bitwise and addition operation to figure out if there is any performance difference:

1) 0-10 random powers of 2

# number of operations btw 1-100

import pandas as pd
import timeit
import numpy as np
from random import choice

scale = 100

df = pd.DataFrame({'num_operations' : np.arange(1, scale + 1), 'random_power_0_10': [[choice(range(10)) for _ in range(num_op)] for num_op in np.arange(1, scale + 1) ]})

df.head()

enter image description here

df['bitwise_timing'] = [timeit.timeit(stmt='reduce(lambda x, y: x | y, num)',
                                      setup=f'from functools import reduce;num={num}')
                        for num in ([2**e for e in pows] for pows in df.random_power_0_10)]

df['addition_timing'] = [timeit.timeit(stmt='reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, num)',
                                      setup=f'from functools import reduce;num={num}')
                        for num in ([2**e for e in pows] for pows in df.random_power_0_10)]

Let's plot the results to see the difference

ax  = df.set_index('num_operations').plot(grid=True, title='Bitwise vs addition operation for random powers(0-10) of 2')
ax.set_ylabel('time in seconds')

enter image description here

df.describe()

enter image description here

the average time for addition seems to be better, but since the difference is so low we can say that it is not a difference between addition and bitwise operation

2) 10 - 100 random powers of 2

got the following plot:

enter image description here

in this case, we can say that addition operation is better

| improve this answer | |

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