9

Please consider the following:

class base{
    base();
    ~base();
}:

class derived : public base{

};

Does a base class destructor get automatically invoked when a derived object is destructed when the derived class has no destructor defined?

Otherwise, if I DO have a destructor in the derived class too, do I have to call the base class destructor explicitly?

class base{
    base();
    ~base();
}:

class derived : public base{
     derived();
     ~derived{
           base::~base(); //do I need this?
     }
};
3
  • 3
    No you don't need to do that - it's automatic
    – Erik
    Commented Apr 5, 2011 at 12:00
  • 1
    Note that you could answer this by simple experiment, by printing something out in the base destructor.
    – Beta
    Commented Apr 5, 2011 at 12:12
  • 1
    @Beta: you are right. But i preferred having a complete explanation of the subject. In fact now i realized that i should declare virtual my destructors in the base class. If I simply tried with a print statement i wouldn't realize that because actually i'm not calling any destructor on a base class reference.
    – Heisenbug
    Commented Apr 5, 2011 at 12:22

4 Answers 4

15

The base class destructor is automatically invoked in this case; you do not need to call it.

However, note that when destroying an object through delete on a base class pointer and the destructor is not virtual, the result is going to be undefined behavior (although you might not get a crash).

Always declare the destructor as virtual in any class which is meant to be derived from. If the base class does not need to have a destructor, include a virtual one anyway with an empty body.

There is an exception to the above rule for an edge case: if your derived classes do not need to support polymorphic destruction, then the destructor does not need to be virtual. In this case it would be correct to make it protected instead; more details here, but be advised that this rarely occurs in practice.

18
  • 1
    The base class destructor is still executed. The derived isn't
    – Erik
    Commented Apr 5, 2011 at 12:03
  • That's kind of a weird statement, if you call delete on base class, only the base class destructor is invoked (if not virtual), so the base class destructor is invoked always :-D Commented Apr 5, 2011 at 12:03
  • "The wrong destructor will be called" is inaccurate. In fact, only the base destructor will be called, and UB will have been invoked. Commented Apr 5, 2011 at 12:04
  • @Erik, @Let_Me_Be: Writing for speed is on the expense of correctness. I corrected that as soon as I read it again.
    – Jon
    Commented Apr 5, 2011 at 12:05
  • 3
    @Jon: Ugh, no, do not make destructors virtual just for the sake of inheritance. Only if you intend to use polymorphism! Otherwise you're just forcing virtual dispatch for potentially no reason. You do talk about this, but as a rare "edge case".. and a protected destructor is only useful for an pure virtual base. KISS! Commented Apr 5, 2011 at 12:21
2

Does a base class destructor is automatically invoked when a derived object is destructed and the derived class has no destructor defined?
Yes, the Base class destructor is automatically invoked after the Derived class Destructor, irrespective of Derived class destructor being explicitly defined or not.

Otherwise, if I have a destructor in the derived class too, do I need to call explicitly base class destructor too?
No, You don't need to. There will not be any scenario in C++, where one has to explicitly invoke a destructor except while using placement new.

1

No, base destructors are invoked automatically in this case, in much the same way that base constructors are can be invoked automatically.

Note, though, that if you are using polymorphism and destroying through a base pointer, you should make sure that the destructor is virtual otherwise this will break.

1

You should never invoke a base class destructor from a derived class destructor.

The reason is base class destructor will be then called automatically for the second time and writing destructors in such way that this doesn't cause problem is problematic - see this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.