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I am facing a problem with one of my header files in a QT project.

Usually I use the following construct:

global.h

#ifndef global
#define global
#include <QLoggingCategory>
Q_DECLARE_LOGGING_CATEGORY(cat)
#endif

foo.h

#ifndef foo
#define foo
#include "global.h"
class foo{
 public:
   void bar();
};
#endif

foo.cpp

#include "foo.h"
Q_LOGGING_CATEGORY(cat, "awesomecategory")
void foo::bar(){
qCDebug(cat) << "helloworld";
}

Which works great. Now i have a header file that implements a templated function from within I want to log to my logging category:

foo.h

#ifndef foo
#define foo

#include "global.h"

template <typename T>
bool bar(T, int val);

// Template definitions outside of header:
#include "foo.tpp"

#endif // foo

foo.tpp

#include <QLoggingCategory>
Q_LOGGING_CATEGORY(cat, "awesomecategory")
template <typename T>
bool bar(T, int val)
{
        T baz;
        // do stuff with baz
        qCDebug(cat) << "helloworld";
}

Which works if I call the templated function in one other cpp file (where I therefore include foo.h, of course) but as soon as i include foo.h in a different cpp file where I want to call the function, i get a multiple definition error like that:

In function `ZN11QStringListD1Ev':
C:\path\to\foo.h:{n}: multiple definition of `cat()'
C:\path\to\foo.h:{n}: first defined here
collect2.exe: error: ld returned 1 exit status

Where do I have to put my Q_LOGGING_CATEGORY macro so that the function can use it and I can still use the header in different places?

2

You can only Q_LOGGING_CATEGORY(cat, "awesomecategory") once because that essentially creates a "global" function from wherever it is called (see below). Also when you #include "foo.tpp" you're just putting the contents of that file into the header (it's not a "separate unit" like a .cpp source file would be, for example).

If you want a global logging category named cat, you could just create that right in your global.h. I don't think Q_LOGGING_CATEGORY(cat, "awesomecategory") will work directly in a header, but that's easy to work around.

Here's what those macros do... it's very simple actually, and much clearer to see what's going on:

#define Q_DECLARE_LOGGING_CATEGORY(name) \
    extern const QLoggingCategory &name();

#define Q_LOGGING_CATEGORY(name, ...) \
    const QLoggingCategory &name() \
    { \
        static const QLoggingCategory category(__VA_ARGS__); \
        return category; \
    }

So the DECLARE one is really just a forward declaration of an exported function. You could just as well put this in global.h instead (and skip all the Q macros entirely):

static const QLoggingCategory &cat()
{
    static const QLoggingCategory category("awesomecategory");
    return category;
}

It needs to be global, or at least within the same default namespace, or only declared within one unit, because...

#define qCDebug(category, ...) \
    for (bool qt_category_enabled = category().isDebugEnabled(); qt_category_enabled; qt_category_enabled = false) \
        QMessageLogger(QT_MESSAGELOG_FILE, QT_MESSAGELOG_LINE, QT_MESSAGELOG_FUNC, category().categoryName()).debug(__VA_ARGS__)

Or in other words, the cat() function created earlier is called in a unit (or in our example, global) context.

Of course if one only calls the category style logging routines only from within members of one class, then the cat() method could just belong to that class.

Or the cat() function itself could be in a namespace or even its own class...

class MyLoggers
{
  public:
    static const QLoggingCategory &cat()
    {
        static const QLoggingCategory category("awesomecategory");
        return category;
    }
}

// used somewhere else:
qCDebug(MyLoggers::cat)  << "Hello cats!";

It's a lot more flexible than those simple macros might have one believe.

HTH

ADDED: The concrete example below seems to work with no errors.

global.h

#ifndef GLOBAL_H
#define GLOBAL_H

#include <QLoggingCategory>

static const QLoggingCategory &cat()
{
    static const QLoggingCategory category("awesomecategory");
    return category;
}

#endif // GLOBAL_H

foo.h

#ifndef FOO_H
#define FOO_H

#include "global.h"

template <typename T>
bool bar(T, int)
{
    qCDebug(cat) << "helloworld";
    return true;
}

#endif // FOO_H

baz.h

#ifndef BAZ_H
#define BAZ_H

#include "global.h"

inline void baz()
{
    qCDebug(cat) << "baz() says meow.";
}

#endif // BAZ_H

main.cpp

#include "foo.h"
#include "baz.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    bar<int>(2, 2);
    baz();
    return 0;
}

Prints:

awesomecategory: helloworld
awesomecategory: baz() says meow.
  • Thank you for the detailed explanation. But even if I include the above construct in the global.h, as soon as i use my function, that calls the static function in the global.h in different units, I still get a lot of errors. So my current workaround is to put the name plaintext in the call: qCWarning(QLoggingCategory("name") << "blahblah...."; – darkmattercoder Apr 17 at 16:15
  • @darkmattercoder I've added a concrete example to my answer, which works in my test project. If that doesn't help, perhaps you could elaborate on which errors you're getting and what your test code looks like now (maybe as an edit to your original question if too long for a comment). – Maxim Paperno Apr 17 at 22:03
  • Well, thanks for adding the example. I must have had something different when I tried last time. I did it again with the help of your input and it worked! – darkmattercoder Jun 24 at 14:06

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