6

I'm trying to write a function that'll convert an integer to a string like this, but I can't figure out the logic... :(

1 = a
5 = e
27 = aa
28 = ab
etc...

Can anyone help? I'm really niffed that I can't wrap my head around how to write this... :(

22

Long list of them here:

/*
 * Convert an integer to a string of uppercase letters (A-Z, AA-ZZ, AAA-ZZZ, etc.)
 */
function num2alpha($n)
{
    for($r = ""; $n >= 0; $n = intval($n / 26) - 1)
        $r = chr($n%26 + 0x41) . $r;
    return $r;
}

/*
 * Convert a string of uppercase letters to an integer.
 */
function alpha2num($a)
{
    $l = strlen($a);
    $n = 0;
    for($i = 0; $i < $l; $i++)
        $n = $n*26 + ord($a[$i]) - 0x40;
    return $n-1;
}
3
  • 2
    +1. Though you need to subtract one from the initial value of $n in num2alpha, and not subtract 1 in the end in alpha2num, in order to match the OP's specification that 1 = A. Apr 5 '11 at 15:44
  • good call -- code was taken straight from the php.net site as a good reference for the concept
    – Kelly
    Apr 5 '11 at 15:48
  • why it doesn't work for a large number like this: num2alpha(20160504123435)?
    – Alqin
    May 30 '16 at 14:50
7

I'll add this answer to sum up the comments regarding the misuse of base-26.

A common first reaction when confronted with this problem is to think "There are 26 letters, so this must be base-26! All I need to do is map each letter to its corresponding number".

But this is not base-26. It's easy to see why: there is no zero!

In base-26, the number twenty-six is the first number with two digits, and is written "10". In this counting system, twenty-six has a single digit, "Z", and the first two-digit number is twenty-seven.

But what if we make A=0, ..., Z=25? This way we have a zero and the first two-digit number becomes twenty-six. So far so good. How do we write twenty-six now? That's "AA". But... isn't A=0? Ooops! A = AA = AAA = "0" = "00" = "000".

3
  • Just trying to wrap my head round this. Wouldn't 26 just be BA, not AA if A=0.
    – Paystey
    Apr 18 '12 at 15:41
  • @Paystey Yes, if this was base-26. But the number that follows 25 (Z) in this scheme is AA. Apr 18 '12 at 15:58
  • Yes, true, just trying to get my head around base 26 made entirely ofletters. It works. But that's not what this is. Thanks.
    – Paystey
    Apr 18 '12 at 16:06
0

You will have to use base_convert to convert your numbers to a 26 base:

base_convert(35, 10, 26);

That gives you the individual components in numbers from 1 - p, so 35 becomes 19 (1 * 26 + 9). Then you have to map the individual components to your desired set, so 1 => a, 9 => i, a => j, etc. and 19 becomes ai.

2
  • 1
    Problem is, 26 => 1 * 26 + 0 => 10 in base 26. Ooops, how do you map the 0? No, this kind of Excel-ish counting is not base 26. Apr 5 '11 at 15:48
  • @Martinho Fernandes Interesting, you're right, there´s no base at all. I wonder how the OP accounts for 0...
    – jeroen
    Apr 5 '11 at 15:57
0

Well, you're pretty much converting from base 10 to base 26. Base 10 has digits 0-9, whereas base 26 can be expressed with "digits" A-Z. Conversion from base-10 is easy - see e.g. this: http://www.mathsisfun.com/base-conversion-method.html Edit: actually, base-26 fails to account for multiple equivalent ways to write 0 ( 0 = 00 = 000).

4
  • No it isn't. Say, "digit" A is equivalent to "digit" 1, B is 2, and so on. So we have 1,2,3,4,...,Z,11,12,13,...,1Z,21. Not good. Ok, let's try A = 0, B = 1, etc. We have 0,1,2,3,4,...,Z,00,01,02,...,0Z,10,. Nope, not base-26 at all. Apr 5 '11 at 15:37
  • @Martinho Fernandes: I did not say base-36, nor 0-9+A-Z; you seem to be using that. Pray tell, how many letters are there in the English alphabet, from A to Z? Last time I checked, there were 26 of them. A = 1,B = 2, C = 3, ..., X = 24, Y = 25, Z = 26, AA = 27 ( 26^1 *A + 26^0 *A ), AB = 28 ( 26^1 * A + 26^0 * A ), AC = 29, AD = 30, etc etc. You may have been confused by base-16, which uses 0-9+A-F, this is a slightly different case. Apr 5 '11 at 15:49
  • You missed my point: 1,2,3,4,...,<whatever the last digit is>,11,12,13. You just missed the number "10" (aka 26)! See, in base 26, the number 26 has two digits, just like 2 in base 2 and ten in base ten. Apr 5 '11 at 15:51
  • @Martinho Fernandes: Looks like I did miss it. If A = 0, then also A = AA = AAA = AAAA = AAAAA = 0. You are right, thank you for correcting me. Apr 5 '11 at 16:02
0
void convert(int number)
{

        string str = "";

    while(number)
    {
        char ch;
        ch = (number - 1) % 26 + 65;    
        str = ch + str;
        number = (number-1) / 26;
    }

    cout << str << endl;
}

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