7

The blue div in this code has a height of 100vh whereas the red div has the height of 5000px. Shouldn't the blue div extend itself to cover the whole viewport because of the 100vh height attribute?

body {
  margin: 0;
}
<div style="position: absolute; left: 35%; width: 100px; height: 100vh; background-color: blue;">
</div>
<div style="position: absolute; left: 50%; width: 100px; height: 5000px; background-color: red;"></div>

What I want to achieve from this is that suppose there's some text which overflows on sizing down the window then how should I get around that situation so that the 100vh height div again covers up the new window size?

11
  • 1
    It works as expected from your CSS. viewport is height seen of the window, what overflows is not part of it
    – G-Cyrillus
    Apr 6, 2019 at 14:24
  • 2
    you are having an overflow, and overflow doesn't count in viewport height Apr 6, 2019 at 14:24
  • Suppose there's some text which overflows on sizing down the window. How should I get around that situation so that the 100vh height div again covers up the new window size? Apr 6, 2019 at 14:44
  • can you share a real use case? because in this situation I would simply set the same height for both Apr 6, 2019 at 15:07
  • 1
    @NeerajKumar I see what you are getting at now. You need to have a wrapper around your sidebar and your main content and then you can set your sidebar to have a height of 100% and it will follow your main content down the page. I am in the middle of something right now but I will try and set up a quick fiddle here in a little bit. I think you are thinking about how to set this up wrong.
    – Steve K
    Apr 6, 2019 at 16:08

3 Answers 3

3

Viewport height just means that the height of the element will be a percentage of the viewport. The viewport being the window your viewing the page on. So if it is a 1920x1080 screen the viewport height will be 1080px or whatever your browser window is, it may be less if you have a toolbar at the bottom of your screen. The issue you are having is that if you want the sidebar to follow the main content down the page you need to disregard the viewport and have a wrapper around both of them like so:

.main-wrapper{
  display:flex;
}

aside{
   background:blue;
   color:#fff;
   width:200px;
}

main{
  background:green;
  height:5000px;
  flex:1
}
<div class="main-wrapper">
  <aside>Your sidebar</aside>
  <main>Your Main Content</main>
</div>

That being said you may want to check out the following fiddle Here. I have made this fiddle responsive for mobile screens so you may have to resize the output window larger to view the sidebar layout. The issue is you are absolutely positioning items and fixing items outside divs which is bad practice. In your example you commented on above you have many layout and z-index issues that you will run into. This fiddle is just an example but it should give you a good frame of reference on how the layout should be thought of.

1
  • The answer that actually helps out; thank you!
    – norman
    Aug 3, 2021 at 21:04
-2

It is happening because that's how vh works. vh is based on the height of viewport. 1vh = 1% of viewport height.

https://www.sitepoint.com/css-viewport-units-quick-start/

2
  • Suppose there's some text which overflows on sizing down the window. How should I get around that situation so that the 100vh height div again covers up the new window size? Apr 6, 2019 at 15:05
  • If the text is more than containers new height than you can use overflow:auto; it will create a scrollable container and text will not flow out. Apr 6, 2019 at 17:17
-2

1vh is Relative to 1% of the height of the viewport*

so 100vh will correspond to 100% of the height of the viewport

demo here

For further details please refer to the CSS Units documentation.

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