11

I've recently noticed some behaviour with the Visual Studio Designer (C#) that I don't understand and was wondering if someone could clarify...

One some of my Windows Forms, the first line of the designer generated code reads;

this.components = new System.ComponentModel.Container();

When this is the case, the dispose method, in that same designer file, the dispose method places two "Dispose" calls within the case "if" condition as follows;

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing && (components != null))
        {
            components.Dispose();
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }
    }

i.e. Nothing is called unless disposing is true, AND components is not null.

On some other forms, that first line in the designer generated code is missing. In these cases the base.Dispose call is outside the "if" condition as such...

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing && (components != null))
        {
            components.Dispose();
        }
        base.Dispose(disposing);
    }

I have noticed this while tracking down a bug with a form not closing, where this.components was null, yet the base.Dispose call was inside that condition (I suspect the designer code had been tampered with but that's another story.

What controls this behaviour?

(Some earlier forms in the project were created in VS 2005 and we now use VS 2008 - clue?)

4

This is reproducible behavior. When you create a new form, it starts out with a skeleton that includes the this.components constructor call. When you then add a component (say a Timer) and remove it again, the designer regenerates the code, now without the constructor call. That isn't a bug.

Fwiw, the skeleton code is generated by Common7\IDE\ItemTemplates\CSharp\Windows Forms\1033\Form.zip\form.designer.cs

Seeing the base.Dispose() call inside the if() statement is a bug. That might be self-induced. Or it might be a beta version of the skeleton code. VS2005 does it right. Do check the ItemsTemplatesCache folder.

  • Thanks nobugz. I have had a chance to try this scenario in VS2005 now too. It's fine. I can only assume, as you say, this was "self induced". – Stuart Helwig Feb 17 '09 at 22:20
  • "now without the constructor call". So, what the point in (components != null) check if there is no components initialization anywhere whatsoever? Who, when and where initializes components? BTW, came here from VS2010, .NET4.0 – Fulproof Mar 18 '13 at 12:42
  • You appear to have a new question. You can ask it by clicking the Ask Question button. – Hans Passant Mar 18 '13 at 13:06
  • @HansPassant So shouldn't we worry about it because the GC frees the e.g. Timer? – Thomas Aug 31 '16 at 2:33
3

6 years later and this problem still occurs. I've managed to track down at least one cause for it happening.

When testing if your component has a constructor that takes an IContainer, System.ComponentModel.Design.Serialization.ComponentCodeDomSerializer caches a reference to the Type of IContainer for your project. If you then save an object for another project within the same solution, or perhaps when you have made some other types of changes in your project, ComponentCodeDomSerializer can no longer find the constructor as the Type of IContainer is no longer equal to it's cached Type.

If this is happening lots for your project, there is a very ugly workaround. Add this VB or C# VisualStudioWorkaroundSerializer class to your solution. Then add the attribute DesignerSerializer(GetType(VisualStudioWorkaroundSerializer), GetType(CodeDomSerializer)) to your component. Whenever your component is saved, this custom serializer will detect the problem, fix it, and force you to save again whenever this issue is about to occur.

1

Interesting glitch! It does indeed sound like a bug in one version of the designer / templating. Of course, if you think the designer code had been tampered, all bets are pretty-much off anyway...

However, in VS2008, it generates the undoubtably correct version:

if (disposing && (components != null))
{
    components.Dispose();
}
base.Dispose(disposing);

So the base Dispose(...) is called. I haven't got VS2005 handy to test it, unfortunately. However - it doesn't initialize the components until it has to - the declaration is:

private System.ComponentModel.IContainer components = null;

And then if it is needed, it is populated in InitializeComponent:

private void InitializeComponent()
{
    this.components = new System.ComponentModel.Container();
    //...
}

I guess with this construct it only has to maintain InitializeComponent (and not the fields itself).

  • No me either Marc. I'll have to give it a try at home tonight. Thanks. – Stuart Helwig Feb 17 '09 at 4:59
  • "if you think the designer code had been tampered" - it is me because I do not understand how to temper it! – Fulproof Mar 18 '13 at 12:46
0

I have seen this happen, and I've also occasionally got warnings about from the Dispose method about components either never having its value assigned, or not being defined.

I think it is a combination of two things:

  1. Slightly different code generation between versions of Visual Studio
  2. The Dispose method is only generated if there is not one already in the file, whereas InitializeComponent (and associated declarations) is generated each time

This results in an InitializeComponent/declarations section that is out-of-whack with the Dispose method.

  • "between versions of Visual Studio" - came here from creating fresh new Windows Forms Applications in VS2010, .NET4.0 without using any other versions (though UI have VS2008 installed on PC) – Fulproof Mar 18 '13 at 12:48

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