1

I'm trying to create a small library to clean up this pattern..

const [a, setA] = useState(1)
const [b, setB] = useState(2)
const [c, setC] = useState(3)
const [d, setD] = useState(4)
const [e, setE] = useState(5)
// ...

Into something that looks like this...

s({
  a: 1,
  b: 2,
  c: 3,
  d: 4,
  e: 5
}, true)

My idea was to loop over the object that is supplied to the s() function, and add each key/value to a state holding object like so:

st = {
  a: 1,
  setA: THE 2nd ITEM IN THE ARRAY THE useState() FUNCTION RETURNS
  // repeat this pattern for b, c, d, e...
}

It seems to be working in the sense that st.a returns 1, and st.setA returns a function bound dispatchAction() (I'm assuming this is what useState()[1] returns).

But when you click the button in the demo below, it does not update any of the st.

(in the example below I use count and cool as vars instead of a, b, c, d, e)

import React, { useState } from 'react'
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom'

// State holder. This could be pulled out to Context for global state.
const st = {}

const s = (obj, setDefaults = false) => {
  if (setDefaults) {
    // Loop over s({...}, true) to create default state.
    Object.keys(obj).map(k => {
      st[k] = useState(obj[k])[0]
      st[`set${k.charAt(0).toUpperCase()}${k.slice(1)}`] = useState(obj[k])[1]
      return null
    })
  } else {
    // Update state using st[setXyz(...)]

    // FIXME: This doesn't update the state.
    // It seems like it would since it is calling things like setCount(2)
    // using the setCount that has a function bound to it in the `st` object.

    for (let k in obj) {
      st[`set${k.charAt(0).toUpperCase()}${k.slice(1)}`](obj[k])
    }

    console.log(st)
  }
}

const App = () => {
  // Set default state object.
  // It's prettier than 20 lines of `const [x, setX] = useState(1)`
  s(
    {
      count: 0,
      cool: true,
    },
    true,
  )

  return (
    <div>
      <button
        onClick={() =>
          // Update state all in one object.
          s({
            count: 2,
            cool: false,
          })
        }
      >
        Click
      </button>

      {/* Access state via the st variable. */}
      <pre>{JSON.stringify(st, null, 2)}</pre>
    </div>
  )
}

const rootElement = document.getElementById('root')
ReactDOM.render(<App />, rootElement)

https://codesandbox.io/s/14xjzl8xx7 <-- Live demo

I suspect I'm not binding correctly, or there might be something weird in how React Hooks work.

Any help would be appreciated.

1
  • it seems like you assigned the value and never updated it in the st[k] Apr 7 '19 at 2:12
2

You are breaking the rules of hooks:

Only Call Hooks at the Top Level

Don’t call Hooks inside loops, conditions, or nested functions. Instead, always use Hooks at the top level of your React function.

Only Call Hooks from React Functions

Don’t call Hooks from regular JavaScript functions.

For components that use larger sized states, I would recommend you to handle it with useReducer instead.

For instance, you can use the useReducer hook to have a setState function that can merge multiple property values at once to your state:

//...
const App = () => {
  const [state, setState] = useReducer(
    (state, newState) => ({ ...state, ...newState }),
    st
  );

  useEffect(() => {

    setState({
      count: 0,
      cool: true
    });
    
  }, []);

//...

As you can see, you can either set the initial state on the useReducer flag on when the component mounts (in the useEffect call in the above example).

You could also extract this state behavior to a custom hook, I find it very useful when refactoring class based components, because it mimics the behavior of the React.Component setState method:

function useSetState(initialState) {
  const [state, setState] = useReducer(
    (state, newState) => ({...state, ...newState}),
    initialState,
  )
  return [state, setState]
}

And therefore you can simply use the above custom hook as you would use setState in class based components.

Check this CodeSandbox fork and the following articles:

Also, forgot to mention about your "state holder" object, I would recommend you that to be just the "initial state" of your component, that's why in my example I'm passing it to the useReducer hook. Since we are letting React handle the state, we shouldn't mutate this object directly, the "current" state of your component will live in the state identifier which we are rendering in my example.

2
  • Out of curiosity, why set st as the initial state, but also use useEffect (on component mount) to set the initial state? Apr 7 '19 at 5:23
  • @corysimmons, edited my answer to address your comment, basically you can set the initial state in any of the two ways, whatever way suits you best, also, added an example of this state behavior extracted to a custom hook. Cheers. Apr 12 '19 at 20:45
1

try something like this

const s = (obj, setDefaults = false) => {
  if (setDefaults) {
    // Loop over s({...}, true) to create default state.
    Object.keys(obj).map(k => {
      st[k] = useState(obj[k]);
      return null;
    });
  } else {
    // Update state using st[setXyz(...)]

    // FIXME: This doesn't update the state.
    // It seems like it would since it is calling things like setCount(2)
    // using the setCount that has a function bound to it in the `st` object.

    for (let k in obj) {
      st[k][1](obj[k]);
      console.log(st[k], obj[k]);
    }

    console.log(st);
  }
};

final working link: https://codesandbox.io/s/qx6r8387x4

0

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