3

I have around 130 characters (as in game characters) loaded in a dictionary in memory which each value containing specific data of a character.

How it works? Each character has 2 chats and 22 reactions.

In a 4 member team you go through every character, grab their two chats go over the other three characters reactions and sum the values of their reactions and repeat. When it's done doing this, grab the two highest values (the chats can't be repeated) and sum them both for the final value.

In an attempt of "pseudo-code":

results = []

for character in team
    for chat in chats_of_character
        chat_morale = 0
        for remaining_character in team 
            if remaining_character is not character
                grab from remaining_character reactions values the value of chat and sum it 
                to chat_morale
                add (chat_morale, character, chat) to results as a tuple

sort results list by the first value of each tuple (chat_morale)
create a new list that removes duplicates based on the third item of every tuple in results
grab the two first (which would be the highest chat_morale out of them all) and sum both 
chat_morale and return the result and total_morale

Or the current piece of code I currently use: (I omitted the part where I sort results by the first value of every tuple in reverse order, then remove tuples if their option value is the same and grabbing the two highest ones based on the first value. I'll add those parts if it's required.)

def _camping(self, heroes):
    results = []

    for hero, data in heroes.items():
        camping_data = data['camping']

        for option in camping_data['options']:
            morale = sum(heroes[hero_2]['camping']['reactions'][option] 
                         for hero_2 in heroes if hero_2 != hero)
            results.append( (morale, hero, option) )

A shortened example of how one of character values look like:

"camping": {
    "options": [
        "comforting-cheer",
        "myth"
    ],
    "reactions": {
        "advice": 8,
        "belief": 0,
        "bizarre-story": 1,
        "comforting-cheer": 6,
     ...

So what I'm trying to build is an efficient and fast system that retrieves the best X remaining members for a team based on the characters that the user input. If an user inputs 2 characters, we'd return the two most fitting remaining characters based on the calculations of some character-specific values, if the user inputs 3 characters then only one member.

Efficiency is necessary in my case since I want to deliver a fast response to the user for a Discord bot.

So I came up with two different attempts to tackle this:

Attempt 1: Calculate them on the fly

    all_heroes = self.game_data.get_all_heroes()

    # Generate all possible combinations.
    for combination in itertools.combinations(h.keys(), r=4):
        # We want only combinations that contains for example the character 'Achates'.
        if set(['achates']).issubset(combination):
            # We grab the character data from the all heroes list to pass it to _camping.
            hero_data = {hero: all_heroes[hero] for hero in combination}
            self._camping(hero_data)

Doing only the combinations alone take around ~6 seconds (around 13 million combinations), and depending on the amount of fixed characters (in the case of the code sample above it's only "Achates") it would take roughly another 3 - 6 more seconds. Which often would end up with running times above 10 seconds, which is an issue since I expect this function to be used quite a lot.

The disadvantage in this system is that I have to calculate them all.

Attempt 2: Precalculate all of the possible team combinations and their total morale and store them in a database

This is by far the closest I was to achieve a solution for this problem. I generated every possible team combination (around 11-13 million), calculated their total morale and store them team and the total morale in a database. Calculating everything and inserting the data would take over an hour, but it's not an issue since it's a one-time only thing and if there's a new character it would be way less record to insert.

With indexing it would only take around ~50-60ms to fetch all teams if the query would contain only one character, sorted by the total morale and limiting it to 50 and even less time if the team contained 2 or 3 characters.

The issue with this attempt is in how the data is stored in columns, which was a huge oversight on my part. While the team order won't affect the total morale result, this is how it was generated by itertools.combinations.

Picture showcasing the problem.

On the first query what I wanted to attempt is to search for a team that contains both Cidd and Tenebria on them, the other best two remaining members for it are Watcher Schuri and Yufine for a total of 34 morale, supposedly. But that's an incorrect result as proven by the second query. There's a team which contains both Cidd and Tenebria and has a higher total morale of 48 but since Tenebria is on the fourth column, the previous query wouldn't be able to catch it.

EDIT 1: I tried generating all possible conditions for the query but still resulted in slow queries.

Attempt 3 - Using @bimsapi method

This is something I tried earlier today, but I tried again following step by step his answer. I ended up with a schema like this:

                               Table "public.campingcombinations"
    Column    |  Type   | Collation | Nullable |                     Default
--------------+---------+-----------+----------+-------------------------------------------------
 id           | bigint  |           | not null | nextval('campingcombinations_id_seq'::regclass)
 team         | text[]  |           |          |
 total_morale | integer |           |          |
Indexes:
    "idx_team" gin (team)

And the table looking like this:

yufinebotdev=# SELECT * FROM CampingCombinations LIMIT 5;
   id   |                  team                  | total_morale
--------+----------------------------------------+--------------
 100001 | {achates,adlay,aither,alexa}           |           26
 100002 | {achates,adlay,aither,angelica}        |           24
 100003 | {achates,adlay,aither,aramintha}       |           25
 100004 | {achates,adlay,aither,arbiter-vildred} |           23
 100005 | {achates,adlay,aither,armin}           |           24

Which sadly gave me varying results. First queries would take over a second, but this is depending on the character and the query plan would be the same. Using one example: Achates.

yufinebotdev=# EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT * FROM CampingCombinations WHERE team @> ARRAY['achates'] ORDER BY total_morale DESC LIMIT 50;
                                                                               QUERY PLAN                                                                    
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=188770.50..188776.33 rows=50 width=89) (actual time=1291.841..1302.641 rows=50 loops=1)
   ->  Gather Merge  (cost=188770.50..221774.07 rows=282868 width=89) (actual time=1291.839..1302.633 rows=50 loops=1)
         Workers Planned: 2
         Workers Launched: 2
         ->  Sort  (cost=187770.47..188124.06 rows=141434 width=89) (actual time=1183.865..1183.868 rows=34 loops=3)
               Sort Key: total_morale DESC
               Sort Method: top-N heapsort  Memory: 35kB
               Worker 0:  Sort Method: top-N heapsort  Memory: 35kB
               Worker 1:  Sort Method: top-N heapsort  Memory: 35kB
               ->  Parallel Bitmap Heap Scan on campingcombinations  (cost=3146.68..183072.14 rows=141434 width=89) (actual time=119.376..1152.543 rows=119253 loops=3)
                     Recheck Cond: (team @> '{achates}'::text[])
                     Heap Blocks: exact=1860
                     ->  Bitmap Index Scan on idx_team  (cost=0.00..3061.82 rows=339442 width=0) (actual time=213.798..213.798 rows=357760 loops=1)
                           Index Cond: (team @> '{achates}'::text[])
 Planning Time: 11.893 ms
 Execution Time: 1302.707 ms
(16 rows)

The second query plan would be exactly like this one taking around 135ms. However, I tried the same with another character 'Serila'.

yufinebotdev=# EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT * FROM CampingCombinations WHERE team @> ARRAY['serila'] ORDER BY total_morale DESC LIMIT 50;
                                                                               QUERY PLAN                                                                    
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=188066.24..188072.07 rows=50 width=89) (actual time=30684.587..30746.121 rows=50 loops=1)
   ->  Gather Merge  (cost=188066.24..224336.01 rows=310862 width=89) (actual time=30684.585..30746.110 rows=50 loops=1)
         Workers Planned: 2
         Workers Launched: 2
         ->  Sort  (cost=187066.22..187454.79 rows=155431 width=89) (actual time=30369.531..30369.535 rows=37 loops=3)
               Sort Key: total_morale DESC
               Sort Method: top-N heapsort  Memory: 36kB
               Worker 0:  Sort Method: top-N heapsort  Memory: 35kB
               Worker 1:  Sort Method: top-N heapsort  Memory: 36kB
               ->  Parallel Bitmap Heap Scan on campingcombinations  (cost=3455.02..181902.91 rows=155431 width=89) (actual time=519.121..30273.208 rows=119253 loops=3)
                     Recheck Cond: (team @> '{serila}'::text[])
                     Heap Blocks: exact=47394
                     ->  Bitmap Index Scan on idx_team  (cost=0.00..3361.76 rows=373035 width=0) (actual time=771.046..771.046 rows=357760 loops=1)
                           Index Cond: (team @> '{serila}'::text[])
 Planning Time: 7.315 ms
 Execution Time: 30746.199 ms
(16 rows)

30 seconds... But I thought maybe following queries would be faster? No, around the same time 28 - 30 seconds per query. While I haven't been able to test it thoroughly, it seems that the "further" the character is the slower the query will be.

For example a character that "starts" with A or B takes 1 second for first query and subsequent ones take 90-100ms. But I try a character with the S like Serila and it shoots up to 15 seconds per query, a character that starts with T on their name around 18 seconds per query or a character that starts with M 7 seconds first query and subsequent ones taking around 900ms - 1 second.

Attempt 4 - Same as above but with varchar[] columns

Rather than just INSERT every value, I'm using COPY which drastically reduces the amount of time it takes to add the values to the table, I'm not too sure if this would affect in anything but will mention it. Another mention is that I switched to my server which runs on 1 vCPU and a 25GB SSD with 1GB of RAM.

Current schema looks like:

                                     Table "public.campingcombinations"
    Column    |        Type         | Collation | Nullable |                     Default
--------------+---------------------+-----------+----------+-------------------------------------------------
 id           | bigint              |           | not null | nextval('campingcombinations_id_seq'::regclass)
 team         | character varying[] |           |          |
 total_morale | integer             |           |          |
Indexes:
    "idx_camping_team" gin (team)
    "idx_camping_team_total_morale" btree (total_morale DESC)

Again had varying results. Some single character queries would take ~10ms at most on their first time being queried vs others taking nearly 2 seconds on first query and subsequent ones depending on the character they would take ~10ms vs 2 seconds.

EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT * FROM CampingCombinations WHERE team @> ARRAY['yufine']::varchar[] ORDER BY total_morale DESC LIMIT 5;

    QUERY PLAN                                                                      
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=0.44..17.03 rows=5 width=89) (actual time=2.155..2.245 rows=5 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using idx_camping_team_total_morale on campingcombinations  (cost=0.44..2142495.49 rows=645575 width=89) (actual time=2.153..2.242 rows=5 loops=1)
         Filter: (team @> '{yufine}'::character varying[])
         Rows Removed by Filter: 2468
 Planning time: 2.241 ms
 Execution time: 2.274 ms
(6 rows)

This is one of the cases where it would stay consistent between queries. But here's one where it would take seconds regardless of how many times I run the query.

EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT * FROM CampingCombinations WHERE team @> ARRAY['tieria']::varchar[] ORDER BY total_morale DESC LIMIT 5;

    QUERY PLAN                                                              
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=0.44..17.21 rows=5 width=89) (actual time=4396.876..8626.916 rows=5 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using idx_camping_team_total_morale on campingcombinations  (cost=0.44..2142495.49 rows=638566 width=89) (actual time=4396.875..8626.906 rows=5 loops=1)
         Filter: (team @> '{tieria}'::character varying[])
         Rows Removed by Filter: 129428
 Planning time: 0.160 ms
 Execution time: 8626.951 ms
(6 rows)

Second query would have similar results. The times were 3.879ms planning time and 6945.253ms execution time. No matter how many times I run it. For some reason it seems something specific regarding that character, haven't found this on other particular characters yet. Same happens if I try 2-man teams with that character.

EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT * FROM CampingCombinations WHERE team @> ARRAY['yufine', 'tieria']::varchar[] ORDER BY total_morale DESC LIMIT 5;

    QUERY PLAN                                                   
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=0.43..874.29 rows=5 width=89) (actual time=24752.449..39808.550 rows=5 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using idx_camping_team_total_morale on campingcombinations  (cost=0.43..1937501.21 rows=11086 width=89) (actual time=24752.444..39808.535 rows=5 loops=1)
         Filter: (team @> '{yufine,tieria}'::character varying[])
         Rows Removed by Filter: 439703
 Planning time: 0.215 ms
 Execution time: 39809.799 ms
(6 rows)

Subsequent runs on that two man team would take nearly the same time, more or less. Now, 3-man team seem to work fine with that character. 50-60ms.

I also found that some 2-man team take nearly 1 minute regardless of how many times I query it, however querying both characters individually has 0 problems at all.

EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT * FROM CampingCombinations WHERE team @> ARRAY['purrgis', 'angelica']::varchar[] ORDER BY total_morale DESC LIMIT 5;
                                                                                 QUERY PLAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Limit  (cost=0.43..821.41 rows=5 width=89) (actual time=33491.860..51059.420 rows=5 loops=1)
   ->  Index Scan using idx_camping_team_total_morale on campingcombinations  (cost=0.43..1937501.21 rows=11800 width=89) (actual time=33491.857..51059.409 rows=5 loops=1)
         Filter: (team @> '{purrgis,angelica}'::character varying[])
         Rows Removed by Filter: 595184
 Planning time: 0.139 ms
 Execution time: 51060.318 ms

But then both characters individually ~2ms.


My question is: Is there a possible solution for the second attempt while taking into account performance and getting the proper results? Or if it's not possible, a better approach for this feature?

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  • This question might be a better fit on Code Review where people discuss improving existing, working code. This question might be perceived as too broad here, although I am uncertain due to inexperience with the involved techniques. – Adriaan Apr 8 '19 at 7:49
2

Precalculating is a good optimization; to better handle the column layout, I suggest using a PostgreSQL array column to store the team members.

  • You can store a reasonably arbitrary number of names in one column
  • The "contains" operator @> is order-independent. I.e., you get the same result if the input is ['foo', 'bar'] as ['bar', 'foo']
  • You can index the column for faster searching, but you must use the gin type
  • You can scale to other team sizes w/out dramatically changing the schema.

In your SQL/DDL:

#simplified table definition:
create table campingcombinations (
    id bigserial,
    members text[],
    morale int
);

create index idx_members on campingcombinations using gin ('members');

In your Python:

# on insert
for team in itertools.combinations(source_list, r=4):
    team = [normalize(name) for name in team] #lower(), strip(), whatever
    morale = some_function() #sum, scale, whatever
    stmt.execute('insert into campingcombinations (members, morale) values (%s, %s)', (team, morale,))

# on select
stmt.execute('select * from campingcombinations where members @> %s order by morale desc', (team,))
for row in stmt.fetchall():
    #do something

For the most part, the psycopg2 driver handles type conversions, but there is a gotcha: depending on how you define the array, you may need casting. For example, I defined the column as members varchar[], so the "contains" clause needed a cast, like this: where members @> %s::varchar[]. By default, the input array will be treated as text[]. If you define the column as text[], you should not have a problem.

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  • I forgot to add that I have tried something like this recently, however ran into the issue where first time querying some characters from the table it would take over 1 - 2 seconds to do so. Next queries, however, would be fast but after a few minutes the same thing would happen again. – Dimbreath Apr 9 '19 at 19:10
  • I updated main post with your method and I think I found out what might be causing slow queries for some characters. – Dimbreath Apr 10 '19 at 2:28
  • Interesting. Thanks for the update. I revisited my code to see if I saw the same perf results (I create a similar size data set just using random names) and found two things - 1) I still had varchar[] as the data type and 2) I added an index on morale. With a two-character query and 11 million rows, I get ~6ms query times regardless of order. Try those two things and see if it helps? – bimsapi Apr 10 '19 at 12:22
  • That seems to have improved (somehow?) the queries when looking for a single character which for some reason uses the index I created on morale DESC, but for some characters, for others it takes ~1 second or a bit more maybe due to it needing to remove more rows because of the filter? 48ms with removing 55k rows and 1 second removing 240k rows. However now queries for multiple characters (at least on first runs) take on average 5 seconds or so. This is weird or I might be doing something wrong. – Dimbreath Apr 10 '19 at 12:49
  • I think you are at a point where this is a generalized RDBMS performance problem; at a high level, this is a reasonably sound design for an RDBMS-based approach. Not sure where your server is running, but in, say EC2, the 'nano', 'micro' or 'small' instance types would have unpredictable IO. Even with indexes, the first queries pay the IO penalty of loading the disk pages to memory. Good luck! – bimsapi Apr 12 '19 at 19:24

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