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I want to extract an unsigned integer from a binary file.

Here is the code I wrote:

std::ifstream is(path, std::ios::in|std::ios::binary);

uint32_t count;
is.read((char*)&count, 4);

std::cout << count << std::endl;

The beginning of the file is 00 00 EA 60, and so I should get 60000.

Instead of that, I get 1625948160, which is 60 EA 00 00.

EDIT:

I am asking if there is a way to have the std::ifstream reverse the bytes itself, i.e. by reading the bytes in reverse order?

I find it overkill to reverse each integers afterward if there is a way to have them read backward from the start

marked as duplicate by πάντα ῥεῖ c++ Apr 7 at 19:05

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  • 3
    Strange that you know enough to tag your question with endianess but don't know enough that this concept completely explains your issue. Reversing the bytes is what you have to do. – john Apr 7 at 19:09
  • @john I am asking if there is a way to have the std::ifstream reverse the bytes itself, I.e. by reading the bytes in reverse order. I find it overkill to reverse each integers afterward if there is a way to have them read backward from the start – Sinder Apr 7 at 20:17
  • @Sinder How would it know which bytes to reverse? Should it reverse the first two bytes? The first seven bytes? The first twenty three bytes? – David Schwartz Apr 7 at 20:27
  • @Sinder No there is no way to make the ifstream reverse the bytes for you. – john Apr 7 at 20:29
  • Ok I got your point. Thank you I will stick to the ntohl() function then – Sinder Apr 7 at 20:51

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