2

Before I begin, I'd like to make it clear that I don't want to modify the jQuery library in any way, I just want to replace the value of the $ global with a custom function that returns a jQuery instance.

In other words, I want the $ global to not equal jQuery and to return a jQuery instance after it's done doing other (non-jQuery) things.

How do I do this without breaking or modifying the jQuery library?

For example, changing the $ function so it logs each selector to the console before returning a jQuery instance, using a regular function declaration, like this:

function $(selector) {
  console.log(selector);
  return jQuery(selector);
}

Results in a tonne of errors like x is undefined or y is used out of scope being thrown.

After doing some research I've tried putting a $.noConflict(true) after the console.log function call, like this:

function $(selector) {
  console.log(selector);
  $.noConflict();
  return jQuery(selector);
}

I got less errors than before but it still doesn't work as expected.

What do I have to change to get my code to work?

1
  • $.noConflict(); well that only works as long as $ is jQuery. If it isn't, then you are calling .noConflict() on your own function which doesn't have it. Which is why you need to be explicit and do jQuery.noConflict() - that way you don't depend on what is currently assigned to $.
    – VLAZ
    Apr 8, 2019 at 12:12

3 Answers 3

2

You can use jQuery.noConflict() to tell jQuery to relinquish control of $.

console.log("$ === jQuery", $ === jQuery);

jQuery.noConflict();

console.log("$ === jQuery", $ === jQuery);

$ = function() {
  console.log(...arguments);
  return jQuery(...arguments);
}

$("#ChangeMe").text("We still use jQuery")
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<span id="ChangeMe">Text to change</span>
This also restores original meaning of $, in case you have more than one thing that tries to grab the global variable.

//make the function that uses $ first
$ = function() {
  console.log(...arguments);
  return jQuery(...arguments);
}

//include jQuery
let script = document.createElement('script')

script.src = "https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js";

script.addEventListener("load", () => {
  console.log("$ === jQuery", $ === jQuery);

  jQuery.noConflict();

  console.log("$ === jQuery", $ === jQuery);

  $("#ChangeMe").text("We still use jQuery")
});

document.body.appendChild(script);
<span id="ChangeMe">Text to change</span>

If you want to reassign the jQuery shorthand, just assign the result of the method call:

j = jQuery.noConflict();

console.log(j === jQuery);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

1

You can do this by creating a reference to the original value and then using that later, like this...

var _$ = $;

function $(selector) {
    console.log(selector);
    return _$(selector);
}

If you want to restore everything back to normal at some point later, you can just re-reference the stored value like this...

$ = _$;

Note: The underscore is just my naming convention. You could call the reference variable anything you like.

0
0

I was getting those errors because I wasn't adding jQuery's existing properties and methods to the new $ function.

I solved the problem by freeing the $ namespace using jQuery.noConflict() and then using jQuery.extend to add jQuery's properties and methods the new $ function before exposing it to the global scope using window.$ = $.

Here is the working code:

(function() {
  jQuery.noConflict();
  // do stuff...
  var $ = function() {
    // do some more stuff...
    return jQuery.apply(jQuery, arguments);
  };
  // do even more stuff...
  jQuery.extend($, jQuery);
  window.$ = $;
})();

I'd also like to thank VLAZ and Archer for their help.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.