1

Is this reducer OK:

function someReducer(state = initialState, action) {
   if (action.type === SOME_ACTION) {
      const newState = Object.assign( {}, state );
      // ...
      // doing whatever I want with newState 
      // ...
      return newState;
   }   
   return state;
}

and if is OK, why we need all those immutable libraries to complicate our lives.

p.s Just trying to comprehend Redux and immutability

  • Which part do you have a question with? SO is not for code reviews – Juan Mendes Apr 8 at 14:01
  • @ristepan I would suggest ask it to react reddit. You may not get attention on this even though it is a valid good question here. SO has many rules.. Better go and ask to more flexible places like I mentioned. – Arup Rakshit Apr 8 at 14:02
  • For deep cloning, we need to use other alternatives because Object.assign() copies property values. If the source value is a reference to an object, it only copies that reference value. – Rayon Apr 8 at 14:03
  • @JuanMendes Question is clear. – Arup Rakshit Apr 8 at 14:03
  • assign is not a deep clone, so you could still reach in and directly modify state. – Dave Newton Apr 8 at 14:08
5

export default function (state = initialState, action) {

  const actions = {
    SOME_ACTION: () => {
      return {
        ...state
      }
    },
    ANOTHER_ACTION: () => {
      return {
        ...state
        error: action.error
      }
    }
    DEFAULT: () => state;
  }
  
  return actions[action.type] ? actions[action.type]() : actions.DEFAULT(); 
}

I prefer doing this instead. I am not a big fan of switch statements.

  • 1
    First time seeing this flow. Tasty! – Mark Apr 8 at 14:11
  • 1
    Check this out: medium.com/chrisburgin/…. It contains more examples and explanations. – Nicolae Maties Apr 8 at 14:13
  • 1
    Nice! Thanks dude. – Mark Apr 8 at 14:14
  • 1
    @NicolaeMaties Nope, it returns a function, the actions constant is defined inside the reducer and contains reducer functions itself which work over closures and preferring objects over switch-case statements is highly subjective. – David Apr 8 at 14:28
  • 2
    Yep! Upvoted :) – David Apr 8 at 16:02
3

The standard approach is to use a switch/case with spread syntax (...) in your reducer.

export default function (state = initialState, action) {
  switch (action.type) {
    case constants.SOME_ACTION:
      return {
        ...state,
        newProperty: action.newProperty
      };

    case constants.ERROR_ACTION:
      return {
        ...state,
        error: action.error
      };

    case constants.MORE_DEEP_ACTION:
      return {
        ...state,
        users: {
          ...state.users,
          user1: action.users.user1
        }
      };

    default:
      return {
        ...state
      }
  }
}

You can then use ES6 spread syntax to return your old state with whatever new properties you want changed/added to it.

You can read more about this approach here... https://redux.js.org/recipes/using-object-spread-operator

  • 2
    Noting that ... is also a shallow clone, and may not be sufficient. – Dave Newton Apr 8 at 14:08
  • It is pretty same approach I think, I understand now assign is not complete deep copy. – ristepan Apr 8 at 14:33
  • Yes, I also added a nested property update to my answer so you can see an example of how to update a nested property. – Mark Apr 8 at 14:39
0

I found something that I really like:

 import createReducer from 'redux-starter-kit';
 const someReducer = createReducer( initialState, {
    SOME_ACTION: (state) => { /* doing whatever I want with this local State */ },
    SOME_ANOTHER_ACTION: (state) => { /* doing whatever I want with local State */ },
    THIRD_ACTION: (state, action) => { ... }, 
 });
-2

If your state has nested objects or arrays, Object.assign or ... will copy references to your older state variable and it may cause some issue. This is the reason why some developers use immutable libraries as in most of the case state has deep nested array or objects.

function someReducer(state = initialState, action) {
   if (action.type === SOME_ACTION) {
       const newState = Object.assign( {}, state );
       // newState can still have references to your older state values if they are array or orobjects

      return newState;
   }   
   return state;
}
  • You just copied his question, there is no answer here. – rrd Apr 8 at 14:07
  • @rrd I think the embedded comment is intended to be the answer. – Dave Newton Apr 8 at 14:09
  • Please read the comment I have added in between the codes. – Ashish Apr 8 at 14:09
  • Answers should be obvious, and visible without hscrolling. – Dave Newton Apr 8 at 14:09
  • I have now also explained the reason. – Ashish Apr 8 at 14:11

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