0

I have a JSON string like this:

[ { "A":"123", "B":"ABC"},{ "A":"345", "B":"CCC"},{ "A":"567", "B":"HGF"}]

The target class for deserialization is:

public class Response 
{
    public Item[] Items { get; set; }
}

public class Item
{
    public string A { get; set; }
    public string B { get; set; }
}

When I deserialize in this way, it doesn't work (it's expecting the "main class" to be present somehow):

Response resp = (Response)JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(content, typeof(Response));

To make it work, I have to:

List<Item> resp = (List<Item>)JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(content, typeof(List<Item>));

Is there a way, maybe annotating the Response class to have the result I'm expecting (the Response instance filled with Item objects)?

thanks

  • As it is now, you can deserialize a List<Item>: var resp = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<Item>>(content); – Jimi Apr 8 at 18:10
  • @Jimi yep, this is what is working, but since it belongs to a larger code base, I'd rather change the class annotation to accomodate it. I want to keep the Response resp = (Response)JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(content, typeof(Response)); as it is – ff8mania Apr 8 at 18:13
  • A larger codebase? So, is this just a piece of the JSON? – Jimi Apr 8 at 18:56
  • @Jimi no. the json is what you saw, but the deserialization piece is created dynamically, so it is expecting the "main" class, and I cannot change that – ff8mania Apr 8 at 19:22
1

You can make Custom JsonConverter as for deserializing and annotate your Response class with your custom JsonConverter:

public class ResponseConverter : JsonConverter
{
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return objectType == typeof(Response);
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        if (reader.TokenType == JsonToken.Null) return null;

        //Construct Response from incoming array
        JArray arr = JArray.Load(reader);

        var response = new Response();
        var itemList = new List<Item>();

        foreach (var item in arr)
        {
            var i = new Item();
            i.A = (string)item["A"];
            i.B = (string)item["B"];
            itemList.Add(i);
        }

        response.Items = itemList.ToArray();
        return response;
    }

    public override bool CanWrite
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        //Currently not implemented, converter supports only deserializing.
        // If you want to support also serialising, implement this method 
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Now you only need to decorate your root class with following attribute:

[JsonConverter(typeof(ResponseConverter))]
public class Response
{
    public Item[] Items { get; set; }
}

And finally you can deserialize json to Response -object:

var response = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Response>(content);
0

Looking right off the bat, your JSON string doesn't appear to fit the format for your Response class. If it did, then it would look something like this:

{ "Items" [ { "A":"123", "B":"ABC"},{ "A":"345", "B":"CCC"},{ "A":"567", "B":"HGF"}] }

So, either you need to adjust your response string accordingly, or adjust your classes.

ALternatively, if you want to keep the classes and response as is, then you would have to do a little more work:

var resp = new Response() { Items = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<Item>>(content).ToArray() };

(May need adjusting as I'm doing this on the fly.)

Here's a link on how to map classes with JSON strings.

https://csharp2json.io/

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