1

Long story short, this is the type of controllers that i see in every code base professionally:

    //All in One Service interfaces
    public class DiController : ControllerBase
    {
        private readonly IDiService _diService;

        public DiController(IDiService diService)
        {
            _diService = diService;
        }

        [HttpGet]
        public IActionResult GetA()
        {
            return Ok(_diService.GetA());
        }

        [HttpGet]
        public IActionResult GetB()
        {
            return Ok(_diService.GetB());
        }
    }

    //Task-based interfaces 
    public class DiController : ControllerBase
    {
        private readonly IAService _aService;
        private readonly IBService _bService;

        public DiController(IAService aService, IBService bService)
        {
            _aService = aService;
            _bService = bService;
        }

        [HttpGet]
        public IActionResult GetA()
        {
           return Ok(_aService.Handle());
        }

        [HttpGet]
        public IActionResult GetB()
        {
            return Ok(_bService.Handle());
        }
    }

Now to keep the post small, imagine that you have one repository for A and other for B, to be used by the service(s). Every component here is Scoped (the same object for every request). Don´t matter what you choose, you end up with a situation like this:

enter image description here

This is in the case of the Task-based interface, and as you can see, you are not using the service B but you get one instance regardless. In the other case you will have the two repositories instantiated.

To solve this problem i used Factories like this:

1 - An abstract class that holds the container and a property that supplies an instance of the Type.

    public interface IGenericFactory<out T>
    {
        T Service { get; }
    }

    public abstract class GenericFactory<T> : IGenericFactory<T> where T : class
    {
        private readonly Container _container;
        public T Service => _container.GetInstance<T>();

        protected GenericFactory(Container container)
        {
            _container = container;
        }
    }

2- The interface to be registered in the container

public interface IAServiceFactory : IGenericFactory<IAService>
{
}

3- The class to be registered in the container

public class AServiceFactory : GenericFactory<IAService>, IAServiceFactory
{
    public AServiceFactory(Container container) : base(container)
    {

    }
}

4- Register the factories as Singletons and the services as Scoped/Transient (according to the use case). This would be an example (in Simple Injector) of how the registration for the Task-Based Interface Controller is done:

_container.Register<IAService, AService>(Lifestyle.Scoped);
_container.Register<IBService, BService>(Lifestyle.Scoped);

_container.Register<IAServiceFactory, AServiceFactory>(Lifestyle.Singleton);
_container.Register<IBServiceFactory, BServiceFactory>(Lifestyle.Singleton);

The final product will be this:

enter image description here

An instance of A, and no B.

Is this correct? I have been in projects where you would have a dozen of Services or Repositories, and only one would be used in each call.

Thank you.

  • 1
    I think here you are violating the S on Solid principles Action GetB should be separated on a controller that use bService – Nabawoka Apr 9 at 0:14
  • In Startup.cs did you try adding services.AddSingleton<IServiceA, ServiceA>(); and services.AddSingletone<IServiceB, ServiceB>();. Afterwards, inject those services to the controller like you showed in the first example and you'll get access to all its properties and methods. – Coke Apr 9 at 4:05
  • In your question you say "to solve this problem" while referring to services not being used. Why os this a problem? Is there a performance problem? If so, did you measure this? – Steven Apr 9 at 6:41
  • 2
    Also understand that injection constructors should be simple so that object graph composition is fast. Performance should be a non-issue. – Steven Apr 9 at 6:45
  • 1
    As long as there is no performance penalty (which there shouldn't be), there is no problem in creating parts of an object graph that arent used. However, creating classes with wide constructors, however, IS a problem as this is an indication of a Single Responsibility Principle violation. Prefer small, narrow classes. Those classes, however, can still contain dependencies that aren't used all the time. That is fine. – Steven Apr 9 at 9:51
1

You can inject into the action:

public IActionResult About([FromServices] IDateTime dateTime)
{
    ViewData["Message"] = $"Current server time: {dateTime.Now}";

    return View();
}

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/mvc/controllers/dependency-injection?view=aspnetcore-2.2#action-injection-with-fromservices

  • The use of method injection in action methods has several sownsides that make it an unattractive method for applying dependencies. – Steven Apr 9 at 11:50

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