30

In case of std::string, if we access an element where (element position) == (size of string) the standard says that it returns a reference to an object of type charT with value charT().

const_reference operator[](size_type pos) const;
reference       operator[](size_type pos);

Expects: pos <= size().

Returns: *(begin() + pos) if pos < size(). Otherwise, returns a reference to an object of type charT with value charT(), where modifying the object to any value other than charT() leads to undefined behavior.

http://eel.is/c++draft/strings#string.access-1

Unfortunately I couldn't reason about this, it would have been better if it has been Undefined Behavior.

Can somebody explain the rationale behind this?

  • 5
    @user463035818 no that's not true. Subscript operator [] does not perform a check. string::at() does and for that reason it throws – KostasRim Apr 9 at 8:30
  • 7
    Doesn't violating "Expects: pos <= size()" lead to UB straight away? The "Otherwise" refers only to the pos == size case, no? – Max Langhof Apr 9 at 8:30
  • 7
    exactly I think the crux is "Expects: pos <= size()." if you dont follow the precondition you are in UB land anyhow, so it is just about accesing the "end" of the string – user463035818 Apr 9 at 8:31
  • 7
    @AImx1 Where does the standard say that violating an "Expects" clause is anything other than UB? – Max Langhof Apr 9 at 8:31
  • 2
    For a C-style string of length X, using the index X will give you the null-terminator. std::string simply tries to emulate that. Going beyond will always lead to UB. – Some programmer dude Apr 9 at 8:32
38

You have to consider the full specs.

First of all:

Expects: pos <= size().

If you dont follow the precondition you have undefined behaviour anyhow. Now...

Returns: *(begin() + pos) if pos < size(). Otherwise, returns a reference to an object of type charT with value charT(), where modifying the object to any value other than charT() leads to undefined behavior.

The only (valid) case that "otherwise" refers to is when pos == size(). And that is probably to emulate c string behaviour that have a some_string[size] element that can be accessed. Note that charT() is typically just '\0'.

PS: One might think that to implement the specification, operator[] would have to check if pos == size. However, if the underlying character array has a charT() at the end of the string, then you get the described behaviour basically for free. Hence, what seems a little different from "usual" access into an array is actually just that.

  • Great explanation. Also a great example how explaining unsupported cases (>size) leads to harder to follow specs. 'otherwise' should have read 'if pos==size' – xtofl Apr 10 at 5:27
22

Statement 1 is the precondition for statement 2:

  1. Expects: pos <= size().

  2. Returns: *(begin() + pos) if pos < size().

    Otherwise (so here the only viable possibility is pos == size()), returns a reference to an object of type charT with value charT() (i.e. '\0'), where modifying the object to any value other than charT() leads to undefined behavior.

str[str.size()] basically points to the null-terminator character. You can read and write it, but you may only write a '\0' into it.

15

The operator expects pos to be less than or equal to size(), so if it is not less, then it is expected to be equal.

2

Additionally to the previous answers please take a look at the libcxx (the llvm implementation) defines std::string::operator[] like:

template <class _CharT, class _Traits, class _Allocator>
inline
typename basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Allocator>::const_reference
basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Allocator>::operator[](size_type __pos) const _NOEXCEPT
{
    _LIBCPP_ASSERT(__pos <= size(), "string index out of bounds");
     return *(data() + __pos);
}

template <class _CharT, class _Traits, class _Allocator>
inline
typename basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Allocator>::reference
basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Allocator>::operator[](size_type __pos) _NOEXCEPT
{
    _LIBCPP_ASSERT(__pos <= size(), "string index out of bounds");
    return *(__get_pointer() + __pos);
}

Take a look at the .at() that properly throws instead.

template <class _CharT, class _Traits, class _Allocator>
typename basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Allocator>::const_reference
basic_string<_CharT, _Traits, _Allocator>::at(size_type __n) const
{
    if (__n >= size())
        this->__throw_out_of_range();
    return (*this)[__n];
}

As you can, in the first case, there is a runtime assert(thanks t.niese for pointing out) which is triggered only in debug mode whereas the second will always throw, regardless of the build options of the library.

  • 3
    That's not a static assert it is a runtime assert. A static_assert is something that is check at compile time, and a static assert is done for both release and debug builds. – t.niese Apr 9 at 8:52
  • std::string name = "StackOverflow"; std::cout << name[100]; @t.niese If it a run time assert, why does the below code doesn't crash? – AImx1 Apr 9 at 8:57
  • 2
    @AImx1 cause you didn't specify that you want the debug build when building the library? – KostasRim Apr 9 at 9:00
  • 3
    @AImx1 because the standard says that name[100] is undefined behavior, and not that it must throw. _LIBCPP_ASSERT is a debugging assert that has to be explicitly enabled and is not automatically enable for regular debug builds, and it is run-time dependent llvm: DebugMode – t.niese Apr 9 at 9:02
  • Also, putting aside the _LIBCPP_ASSERT, what this code snippet really shows is there is no test like if (__pos >= size()) return _CharT(), which is what would be needed for the behaviour the original question was expecting. Without a test like this, the only way _CharT() could be returned is if it is stored in the buffer pointed to by data(). Obviously this can't the case for all possible values of __pos, unless the buffer takes up all the memory on your computer! – Arthur Tacca Apr 9 at 14:45

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