I've just started using EF code first, so I'm total beginner in this topic.

I wanted to create relations between Teams and Matches: 1 match = 2 teams (home, guest) and result. I thought It's easy to create such model, so I started coding:

public class Team
{
    [Key]
    public int TeamId { get; set;} 
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Match> Matches { get; set; }
}


public class Match
{
    [Key]
    public int MatchId { get; set; }

    [ForeignKey("HomeTeam"), Column(Order = 0)]
    public int HomeTeamId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("GuestTeam"), Column(Order = 1)]
    public int GuestTeamId { get; set; }

    public float HomePoints { get; set; }
    public float GuestPoints { get; set; }
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }

    public virtual Team HomeTeam { get; set; }
    public virtual Team GuestTeam { get; set; }
}

And I get an exception :

The referential relationship will result in a cyclical reference that is not allowed. [ Constraint name = Match_GuestTeam ]

How can I create such model, with 2 foreign keys to same table ? TIA.

up vote 264 down vote accepted

Try this:

public class Team
{
    public int TeamId { get; set;} 
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Match> HomeMatches { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Match> AwayMatches { get; set; }
}

public class Match
{
    public int MatchId { get; set; }

    public int HomeTeamId { get; set; }
    public int GuestTeamId { get; set; }

    public float HomePoints { get; set; }
    public float GuestPoints { get; set; }
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }

    public virtual Team HomeTeam { get; set; }
    public virtual Team GuestTeam { get; set; }
}


public class Context : DbContext
{
    ...

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<Match>()
                    .HasRequired(m => m.HomeTeam)
                    .WithMany(t => t.HomeMatches)
                    .HasForeignKey(m => m.HomeTeamId)
                    .WillCascadeOnDelete(false);

        modelBuilder.Entity<Match>()
                    .HasRequired(m => m.GuestTeam)
                    .WithMany(t => t.AwayMatches)
                    .HasForeignKey(m => m.GuestTeamId)
                    .WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
    }
}

Primary keys are mapped by default convention. Team must have two collection of matches. You can't have single collection referenced by two FKs. Match is mapped without cascading delete because it doesn't work in these self referencing many-to-many.

  • 3
    What if two teams are allowed to play only once? – ca9163d9 Jun 8 '13 at 18:53
  • 2
    @NickW: That is something you have to handle in your application and not in the mapping. From the mapping perspective, pairs are allowed to play twice (each is guest and home once). – Ladislav Mrnka Jun 8 '13 at 22:08
  • 2
    I have a similar model. What is the proper way to handle cascade delete if a team is removed? I looked into creating an INSTEAD OF DELETE trigger but not sure if there is a better solution? I would prefer to handle this in the DB, not the application. – Woodchipper Apr 30 '14 at 0:47
  • 1
    @mrshickadance: It is the same. One approach uses fluent API and another data annotations. – Ladislav Mrnka Aug 8 '14 at 17:15
  • 1
    If I use WillCascadeOnDelete false then If I want to delete the Team Then it is throwing error. A relationship from the 'Team_HomeMatches' AssociationSet is in the 'Deleted' state. Given multiplicity constraints, a corresponding 'Team_HomeMatches_Target' must also in the 'Deleted' state. – Rupesh Kumar Tiwari Jun 30 '15 at 20:06

It's also possible to specify the ForeignKey() attribute on the navigation property:

[ForeignKey("HomeTeamID")]
public virtual Team HomeTeam { get; set; }
[ForeignKey("GuestTeamID")]
public virtual Team GuestTeam { get; set; }

That way you don't need to add any code to the OnModelCreate method

  • 4
    I get the same exception either way. – Jo Smo Dec 1 '15 at 3:44
  • 9
    This is my standard way of specifying foreign keys which works for all cases EXCEPT when an entity contains more than one nav property of the same type (similar to the HomeTeam and GuestTeam scenario), in which case EF gets confused in generating the SQL. Solution is to add code to OnModelCreate as per the accepted answer as well as the two collections for both sides of the relationship. – Steven Manuel Jun 17 '16 at 2:54

I know it's a several years old post and you may solve your problem with above solution. However, i just want to suggest using InverseProperty for someone who still need. At least you don't need to change anything in OnModelCreating.

The below code is un-tested.

public class Team
{
    [Key]
    public int TeamId { get; set;} 
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [InverseProperty("HomeTeam")]
    public virtual ICollection<Match> HomeMatches { get; set; }

    [InverseProperty("GuestTeam")]
    public virtual ICollection<Match> GuestMatches { get; set; }
}


public class Match
{
    [Key]
    public int MatchId { get; set; }

    public float HomePoints { get; set; }
    public float GuestPoints { get; set; }
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }

    public virtual Team HomeTeam { get; set; }
    public virtual Team GuestTeam { get; set; }
}

You can read more about InverseProperty on MSDN: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/jj591583?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396#Relationships

  • Thanks for this answer, however it makes the Foreign Key columns nullable in the Match table. – RobHurd Aug 21 '16 at 14:41
  • This worked great for me in EF 6 where nullable collections were needed. – Pynt Sep 12 '16 at 14:14
  • If you want to avoid fluent api (for whatever reason #differentdiscussion) this works fantastically. In my case I needed to include an additional foriegnKey annotation on the "Match" entity, because my fields/tables have strings for PK's. – DiscipleMichael Apr 26 '17 at 15:09
  • This worked greatly for me. Btw. if you do not want the columns nullable you can just specify foreign key with the [ForeignKey] attribute. If the key is not nullable then you are all set. – Jakub Holovsky Feb 12 at 16:10

You can try this too:

public class Match
{
    [Key]
    public int MatchId { get; set; }

    [ForeignKey("HomeTeam"), Column(Order = 0)]
    public int? HomeTeamId { get; set; }
    [ForeignKey("GuestTeam"), Column(Order = 1)]
    public int? GuestTeamId { get; set; }

    public float HomePoints { get; set; }
    public float GuestPoints { get; set; }
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }

    public virtual Team HomeTeam { get; set; }
    public virtual Team GuestTeam { get; set; }
}

When you make a FK column allow NULLS, you are breaking the cycle. Or we are just cheating the EF schema generator.

In my case, this simple modification solve the problem.

  • 3
    Caution readers. Although this might work-around the schema definition problem, it alters the semantics. It is probably not the case that a Match can be had without two teams. – N8allan Aug 18 '15 at 5:25

This is because Cascade Deletes are enabled by default. The problem is that when you call a delete on the entity, it will delete each of the f-key referenced entities as well. You should not make 'required' values nullable to fix this problem. A better option would be to remove EF Code First's Cascade delete convention:

modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<OneToManyCascadeDeleteConvention>(); 

It's probably safer to explicitly indicate when to do a cascade delete for each of the children when mapping/config. the entity.

  • So what is it after this is executed? Restrict instead of Cascade? – Jo Smo Dec 1 '15 at 3:52

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.