74

Is there a JavaScript equivalent to .NET's String.IsNullOrWhitespace so that I can check if a textbox on the client-side has any visible text in it?

I'd rather do this on the client-side first than post back the textbox value and rely only on server-side validation, even though I will do that as well.

3
  • 4
    You don't need a dedicated function for that. Just test this expression: x.value.trim() === '' (where x is a reference to your input element). This expression will return true if the value is only whitespace, false otherwise. Using a dedicated function for such a simple task is overkill. (Note: you would need to implement trim() for IE8 and below. This is an easy task and something that you would want to do anyway.) Apr 5, 2011 at 23:49
  • 5
    well a textbox value can not be null so that is just a waste of a check. Apr 6, 2011 at 0:14
  • 4
    "well a textbox value can not be null." That may be true, but a million other strings can. I have a custom knockout binding on a datepicker, and it can be null.
    – Rhyous
    Apr 10, 2014 at 17:02

8 Answers 8

92

For a succinct modern cross-browser implementation, just do:

function isNullOrWhitespace( input ) {
  return !input || !input.trim();
}

Here's the jsFiddle. Notes below.


The currently accepted answer can be simplified to:

function isNullOrWhitespace( input ) {
  return (typeof input === 'undefined' || input == null)
    || input.replace(/\s/g, '').length < 1;
}

And leveraging falsiness, even further to:

function isNullOrWhitespace( input ) {
  return !input || input.replace(/\s/g, '').length < 1;
}

trim() is available in all recent browsers, so we can optionally drop the regex:

function isNullOrWhitespace( input ) {
  return !input || input.trim().length < 1;
}

And add a little more falsiness to the mix, yielding the final (simplified) version:

function isNullOrWhitespace( input ) {
  return !input || !input.trim();
}
1
  • 3
    This may fail with Uncaught TypeError: input.trim is not a function if input isn't a string. Sep 8, 2019 at 5:27
89

It's easy enough to roll your own:

function isNullOrWhitespace( input ) {

    if (typeof input === 'undefined' || input == null) return true;

    return input.replace(/\s/g, '').length < 1;
}
10
  • g = global, i = case insensitive. Actually probably don't need the i. By default javascript replace only replaces the first match, but with the g it replaces all instances.
    – Dexter
    Apr 5, 2011 at 22:58
  • Does not work with undefined. plnkr.co/edit/oHy8iVk7qio12Klpoh72?p=preview
    – Rhyous
    Dec 17, 2014 at 20:51
  • 1
    Updated to support undefined. Your other test case is failing before it enter this method @Rhyous.
    – Dexter
    Dec 19, 2014 at 0:54
  • 3
    Why use Regex instead of trim()? Apr 4, 2019 at 16:23
  • 1
    This was posted in 2011, before trim() was part of the spec - but yes, you could use trim() now! (developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…)
    – Dexter
    Apr 5, 2019 at 23:11
3

no, but you could write one

function isNullOrWhitespace( str )
{
  // Does the string not contain at least 1 non-whitespace character?
  return !/\S/.test( str );
}
6
  • should be !/\S/.test(typeof(str) == 'string' ? str : ''). If it's not, null, undefined, any any object will return true.
    – user578895
    Apr 5, 2011 at 22:50
  • 1
    I would write it as !str || !/\S/.test(str);
    – Neil
    Apr 5, 2011 at 22:57
  • 1
    none, but you're writing a generic function that may be used in another context :)
    – user578895
    Apr 6, 2011 at 16:48
  • 1
    @cwolves I guess we just interpreted the "null" in the function name differently. I took it to be "null string", not the actual null value. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empty_string Apr 6, 2011 at 17:56
  • 1
    This fails for both null and undefined values: plnkr.co/edit/zWruFu?p=preview
    – Rhyous
    Dec 17, 2014 at 20:54
2

Try this out

Checks the string if undefined, null, not typeof string, empty or space(s

/**
  * Checks the string if undefined, null, not typeof string, empty or space(s)
  * @param {any} str string to be evaluated
  * @returns {boolean} the evaluated result
*/
function isStringNullOrWhiteSpace(str) {
    return str === undefined || str === null
                             || typeof str !== 'string'
                             || str.match(/^ *$/) !== null;
}

You can use it like this

isStringNullOrWhiteSpace('Your String');
0

You must write your own:

function isNullOrWhitespace(strToCheck) {
    var whitespaceChars = "\s";
    return (strToCheck === null || whitespaceChars.indexOf(strToCheck) != -1);
}
1
  • This technique only works for blank strings such as "" and not for strings with multiple whitespace characters. May 8, 2012 at 20:43
0

trim() is a useful string-function that JS is missing..

Add it:

String.prototype.trim = function() { return this.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g,"") }

Then: if (document.form.field.value.trim() == "")

1
  • String.prototype.trim is part of JavaScript since v5.1 / June 2011 Mar 19, 2019 at 14:48
0

Pulling the relevant parts of the two best answers, you get something like this:

function IsNullOrWhitespace(input) {
    if (typeof input === 'undefined' || input == null) return true;
    return !/\S/.test(input); // Does it fail to find a non-whitespace character?
}

The rest of this answer is only for those interested in the performance differences between this answer and Dexter's answer. Both will produce the same results, but this code is slightly faster.

On my computer, using a QUnit test over the following code:

var count = 100000;
var start = performance.now();
var str = "This is a test string.";
for (var i = 0; i < count; ++i) {
    IsNullOrWhitespace(null);
    IsNullOrWhitespace(str);
}
var end = performance.now();
var elapsed = end - start;
assert.ok(true, "" + count + " runs of IsNullOrWhitespace() took: " + elapsed + " milliseconds.");

The results were:

  • RegExp.replace method = 33 - 37 milliseconds
  • RegExp.test method = 11 - 14 milliseconds
0

You can use the regex /\S/ to test if a field is whitespace, and combine that with a null check.

Ex:

if(textBoxVal === null || textBoxVal.match(/\S/)){
    // field is invalid (empty or spaces)
}
2
  • This doesn't check for null values Feb 4, 2018 at 5:18
  • if textBoxVal is null, then the first part of your condition will throw. You need the textBoxVal === null first. Mar 5, 2018 at 11:26

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