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User will enter two string value, a and b. My code will create a bigger string made of the first char of a, the first char of b, the second char of a, the second char of b, and so on. Any leftover chars go at the end of the result. How can I do this the easiest way? I was confused about how to start.

System.out.print("Enter 2 words");
String s1 = input.nextLine();
String s2 = input.nextLine();
int num = 0;
for (int i = 0; i<s1.length();i++) {    
    char a = s1.charAt(i+num);
    num++;
}
3
  • Get both the string as input, compare which one is the shorter one. subString the longer one to the length of the shorter one. Iterate through both string character by character and create your new string. At the end, append the remaining substring of the longer string to the result. – VSB Apr 9 '19 at 17:04
  • I am not sure what you have planned for that num variable, but I suspect what actually happens is not what you are expecting to happen. This line: char a = s1.charAt(i+num); is better off as : char a = s1.charAt(i); – ck1221 Apr 9 '19 at 17:14
  • 1
    Also, when you get confused about how to start or what to do. Start by thinking about how you would do this on paper. And then convert that into your program. – ck1221 Apr 9 '19 at 17:15
1

You can use a StringBuilder to achieve that:

StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder(s1);
for (int i = 0; i < s2.length(); i++) {
    result.insert(Math.min(i * 2 + 1, result.length()), s2.charAt(i));
}
System.out.println(result.toString());

First you create a StringBuilder with String s1 as input. Now you can iterate over the length of String s2 and insert each char in the result. Math.min() is used to prevent a StringIndexOutOfBoundsException.

The result for s1 = "TEST" and s2 = "test" is:

TtEeSsTt

The result for s1 = "TESTASDF" and s2 = "test" is:

TtEeSsTtASDF

The result for s1 = "TEST" and s2 = "testasdf" is:

TtEeSsTtasdf

1

Here is another implementation, also using StringBuilder, but causing less moving around of characters by only using append(), instead of using insert().

static String mix(String s1, String s2) {
    int len = Math.min(s1.length(), s2.length());
    StringBuilder buf = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        buf.append(s1.charAt(i)).append(s2.charAt(i));
    }
    return buf.append(s1.substring(len)).append(s2.substring(len)).toString();
}

Basically, it appends characters to the result for the part where both inputs contribute, then appends the remainder from the longer input (relying on substring(len) to return an empty string from the shorter input).

Test

System.out.println(mix("TEST", "test"));
System.out.println(mix("TESTASDF", "test"));
System.out.println(mix("TEST", "testasdf"));
System.out.println(mix("πŸ˜€πŸ˜Ž", "😈😑😱"));

Output

TtEeSsTt
TtEeSsTtASDF
TtEeSsTtasdf
?πŸ˜€??😎?😱

As you can see, that code cannot handle characters outside the Basic Multilingual Plane, since those are stored as a surrogate pair of characters. To support that, you can change to code like this (Java 8+):

static String mix(String s1, String s2) {
    int[] a1 = s1.codePoints().toArray();
    int[] a2 = s2.codePoints().toArray();
    int[] r = new int[a1.length + a2.length];
    for (int i1 = 0, i2 = 0, j = 0; j < r.length; ) {
        if (i1 < a1.length)
            r[j++] = a1[i1++];
        if (i2 < a2.length)
            r[j++] = a2[i2++];
    }
    return new String(r, 0, r.length);
}

Output

TtEeSsTt
TtEeSsTtASDF
TtEeSsTtasdf
πŸ˜€πŸ˜ˆπŸ˜ŽπŸ˜‘πŸ˜±

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