2

Basically I'm having a hard time getting the execution time any lower than it is, as well as reducing the amount of clock cycles and memory size. Does anyone have any idea on how I can do this? The code works fine I just want to change it a bit.

Wrote a working code, but don't want to mess up the code, but also don't know what changes to make.

; Calculation of a factorial value using a simple loop

; set up the exception addresses
THUMB
AREA RESET, CODE, READONLY
EXPORT  __Vectors
EXPORT Reset_Handler
__Vectors 
DCD 0x00180000     ; top of the stack 
DCD Reset_Handler  ; reset vector - where the program starts

AREA 2a_Code, CODE, READONLY
Reset_Handler
ENTRY
start   
MOV r1,#0    ; count the number of multiplications performed 
MOV r2,#3    ; the final value in the factorial calculation
MOV r3,#1    ; the factorial result will be stored here

; loop r2 times forming the product  
fact
ADD r1,r1,#1  ; find the next multiplicand
MUL r3,r1,r3  ; form the next product - note that MUL r3,r3,r1 gives unpredictable output
CMP r1,r2     ; check if the final value has been reached
BMI fact      ; continue if all products have not been formed

exit    ; stay in an endless loop 
B exit
END

The current results are: Memory Size: 0x00000024 Clock Cycles: 22 Total Execution Time:1.1 Micro seconds

We are working with the Cortex M3

I just need any of these to be reduced, the changes to the code can be minor as long as it produces different results.

8
  • 2
    Is this a homework or something? What is the exact wording of the task you were assigned? The code you presented can be replaced with MOV r3,#6, hence the questions above. Also what CPU core you're working with and how do you calculate the clock cycles?
    – tum_
    Apr 9 '19 at 22:30
  • 1
    Can you please elaborate on what you mean by the code presented can be replaced with MOV r3,#6, please? The CPU core is Cortex M3, hope that helps. Apr 10 '19 at 18:43
  • @Hysteria103: your current program computes the factorial of an assemble-time constant. Just like a C compiler doing constant-propagation and replacing a loop with the result, it would be equivalent to mov r3, #n!, except the assembler won't do that for you so you have to manually write it as 6. In any real program where you sometimes need to compute a factorial, if the number of possible inputs is small then it's worth considering just choosing from some pre-calculated versions. Or if it's the factorial of an assemble-time constant, computing at runtime would be a terrible idea. Apr 10 '19 at 20:32
  • Obviously you're only doing mov r2, #3 to create an input for the factorial code so you can test it easily, without a keyboard input function and so on. But that input-setup should be separate from the instructions that are actually part of the computation. Apr 10 '19 at 20:34
  • 2
    elaborate on what you mean - the code between start an exit labels in your question can be replaced by MOV r3,#6 if the task you are solving is to compute the 3! and put the result into r3. It is of course pretty obvious that such a task makes little sense but the trouble is that you never explained what exactly your task is (still didn't). It's a bit of a bad style - just throw some code into people and leave them guessing as they may waste their time guessing in the wrong direction. Luckily, @PeterCordes has found enough time to produce an hour long lecture as an answer..
    – tum_
    Apr 10 '19 at 21:12
5

Often code-size and performance are a tradeoff. Unrolling a loop often helps performance (for large inputs at least), but requires extra logic outside the loop to handle the cleanup and so on.


Most of this answer was assuming a higher-performance CPU like Cortex-A9 or Cortex-A53 where software pipelining to create instruction-level parallelism would be helpful. Cortex M3 is scalar and has a single-cycle multiply instruction, making it much simpler to optimize for.

(The original question didn't specify a core, and I was expecting that even low-end CPUs would have multi-cycle mul latency. I only found Cortex-M3 numbers after writing it.)

Your code will probably bottleneck on the latency of integer multiply. Unlike add, where the result will be ready the next cycle, mul is complex and takes multiple cycles to produce a result.

(Except on some very slowly-clocked chips, like apparently Cortex-M3 has a 1-cycle mul instruction. But Cortex-M0/M0+/M23 are available with a choice of 1 cycle or 32 cycle performance for that instruction! Slow iterative = smaller silicon.)


The multiply execution unit itself is often pipelined so multiple independent multiplies can be in flight at once, but your factorial loop needs each multiply result as an input to the next iteration. (Only for higher-performance cores, not Cortex-M series. The 32-cycle multiply on slow cortex-M chips is iterative and presumably not pipelined, so another multiply couldn't start while it's running, and there'd be no benefit to exposing any instruction-level parallelism beyond reducing loop overhead.)

Notice that multiplication is associative: 1 * 2 * 3 = 3 * 2 * 1, so we can count down from n, as @ensc's answer points out. Or (1*2) * (3*4) = 1*2*3*4.

We could instead do 1 * 2 * ... * (n/2) in parallel with n/2+1 * n/2+2 * n/2+3 * ... * n, interleaving work on those two dependency chains. Or we could interleave 1 * 3 * 5 * ... * n with 2 * 4 * 6 * ... n-1, in a loop that did n -= 2 and calculates n+1 from that. (Then at the end, you multiply those 2 products).

This is obviously going to require more code-size, but could help performance a lot.


Of course, a lookup table is another workaround. If you only care about inputs that don't overflow a 32-bit result, that's a pretty small table. But that has a significant size cost.


Even on an in-order CPU (where instruction execution has to start in program order), long-running instructions like cache-miss loads, or multiplies, may be allowed to complete out of order, so e.g. some add instructions could run after starting a mul but before the mul result was written back. Or even starting another independent mul instruction in the shadow of an earlier mul's latency.

I googled some ARM performance numbers to maybe get a feel for what's typical.

For example, Cortex-A9 is an older fairly common high-end ARMv7 CPU that is superscalar (multiple instructions per cycle) with out-of-order execution.

mul "takes" 2 cycles, and has 4 cycle result latency. They don't explain what they mean by the non-latency cost. Perhaps that's the reciprocal throughput of the execution unit, like how often you can start a new independent operation. It's an out-of-order CPU so it doesn't make sense for it to stall other instructions for 2 cycles. In the NEON SIMD instruction section, they explain what looks like the same "cycles" number:

This is the number of issue cycles the particular instruction consumes, and is the absolute minimum number of cycles per instruction if no operand interlocks are present.

(operand interlocks = waiting for an input operand to be ready, if an earlier instruction hasn't produced a result yet).

(Cortex-A9 does support packed integer multiplication, so for large factorials you could look at doing 4 multiplies in parallel starting one vector per 4 cycles, using vmul.32 q1, q1, q2. Or 2 per 2 cycles with 64-bit d registers, but then you'd need more vadd instructions and unlike multiply, vadd.32 is just as fast with 128-bit q regs as with 64-bit vectors. So SIMD can give you twice the multiply throughput of scalar on Cortex-A9, if you use enough registers to hide the large latency. But SIMD would probably only be useful with n so large that n! overflows a 32-bit integer, so you get a result modulo 2^32.)


Lower latency ARM multiply instructions:

mul is a 32x32 => 32-bit multiply. On Cortex-A9, it has 2c throughput and 4c latency.

(muls is a 16-bit instruction in thumb mode, and should be preferred unless you need to not clobber the flags. mul in Thumb mode is only available in ARMv6T2 and later.)

smulbb is a 16x16 => 32-bit signed multiply that only reads the low half of its inputs, but has 1c throughput and 3c latency on A9. (BB = bottom, bottom. The other combinations are also available, along with multiply-accumulate and various funky things.)

There is not 2-byte Thumb version of smulxy, so this is worse for code-size than muls.

Unfortunately smulxy isn't available in an unsigned version, so that limits the range of inputs we can use it with to positive int16_t, not uint16_t.

But if we only care about the case where the final 32-bit result doesn't overflow, we can arrange our order of operations so the last multiply has 2 inputs of similar magnitude (both large-ish 16-bit numbers). i.e. as close to sqrt(n!) as possible. So e.g. the product of odds and evens would be reasonable, but (n-1)! * n would be the worst case because that would require (n-1)! to fit in 16 bits. Actually the worst case would be counting down from n so the last one is a multiply by 3 then 2. We could special case the multiply by 2 to a left shift...


Putting these pieces together, notice that multiplying by 1 is a no-op (except with smulbb where it truncates the input to 16 bit). So we can unroll in a way that stops after a multiply by 1 or 2 depending on the input being odd or even.

So instead of knowing which is odd and which is even, we just have lo (starting with n-1) and hi (starting with n).

;; UNTESTED, but it does assemble with the GNU assembler, after sed -i 's/;/@/' arm-fact.S
;; and replacing THUMB with
; .thumb
; .syntax unified
THUMB

;; Input: n in r0.   (n is signed positive, otherwise we return n.)
;; Output: n! in r0.
;; clobbers: r1, r2, r3
;; pre-conditions: n! < 2^31.  Or maybe slightly lower.
fact:
    subs   r3, r0, #3   ; r3 = lo = n-3  (first multiplier for loprod)
    bls   .Ltiny_input
    subs   r2, r0, #2   ; r2 = hi = n-2  (first multiplier for hiprod)
    subs   r1, r0, #1   ; r1 = loprod = n-1
                        ; r0 = hiprod = n

.Lloop:                 ; do {
    smulbb  r0,r0, r2      ; hiprod *= hi
    subs    r2, #2         ; hi -= 2 for next iter
    smulbb  r1,r1, r3
    subs    r3, #2         ; lo -= 2 for next iter
    bgt     .Lloop       ; while((lo-=2) > 0);  signed condition
    ; r3 = 0 or -1, r2 = 1 or 0.  The last multiplies were:
    ;       hiprod *= 2 and loprod *= 1  for even n
    ;   or  hiprod *= 3 and loprod *= 2  for odd n

    ; muls  r0, r1
    smulbb  r0,r0, r1      ; return  hiprod *= loprod

    bx lr    ; or inline this

.Ltiny_input:   ; alternate return path for tiny inputs
    ; r0 = n.   flags still set from  n - 3
    IT eq                  ; GAS insists on explicit IT for thumb mode
    moveq   r0, #6         ; 3! = 6, else n! = n for smaller n=1 or 2.
                           ; 0! = 1 case is not handled, nor are negative inputs
    bx lr

(.L in a label name makes it a local label that doesn't show up in the object file, at least in GAS syntax. Maybe not in ARMASM, if you're using that assembler.)

ARM assembly lets you leave out the destination when it's the same as the first source, for some instructions like subs but not smulbb. You could write it out like subs r2, r2, #2 every time if you want.

You might use muls r0, r1 for the final product, because the final hiprod is a bit higher than loprod. The product might not overflow even if hiprod > max int16_t. That would save 2 bytes of code-size, too, but add 1 cycle of latency on Cortex-A9. (BTW, ARMv6 fixed the "unpredictable result" with mul d,d, src weirdness, and your code used 32-bit Thumb2 instructions, thus it only works on ARMv6T2 and above anyway.)


With 2 accumulators for the products, this can possibly run at 2 multiplies per 3 cycles on Cortex-A9, depending greatly on the CPU micro-architecture and whether its front-end can keep up. On an in-order ARM, I'd be worried about it being able to start other instructions before a multiply finished.

It might be better to spend 2 extra bytes on sub instead of subs so we can compute the flags a couple instructions ahead of the branch, maybe reducing branch mispredict penalty and avoiding stalls on in-order CPUs. smulbb doesn't touch flags, so we can do loprod first and have the hi stuff not touch flags.

.loop:                  ; do {
    smulbb  r1, r3       ; loprod *= lo
    subs    r3, #2       ; lo -= 2 for next iter, and set flags
    smulbb  r0, r2       ; hiprod *= hi
    sub     r2, #2       ; hi -= 2 for next iter (no flags)
    bgt     .loop       ; while((lo-=2) >= 0);

Note that we're modifying r3 and r2 right after smulbb reads them, avoiding creating a stall for the data dependency on in-order chips.


You're using Thumb mode and optimizing for code-size, so it's important to know which forms of which instructions can use a 2-byte / 16-bit encoding and which are only available as 32-bit Thumb2 encodings.

subs Rd, Rn, #imm can be encoded as a 16-bit Thumb instruction for imm=0..7 (3-bit immediate). Or with the same register as src and destination, for imm=0..255. So my copy-and-sub instructions are compact.

Non-flag-setting sub can't be a 16-bit instruction except inside a IT block, or with SP as the operand.

Predicated instructions in Thumb mode, like moveq r0, #6, require the assembler to use an IT instruction to introduce predication for the next up-to-4 instructions. In ARM mode, the top 4 bits of every instruction signals predication. (If you don't use a suffix, the assembler encodes it as ALways, i.e. not predicated.)

We could handle the n==0 case with another 4 or 6 bytes, with cmp r0,#0 / moveq r0, #1. Maybe getting it down to 4 bytes if we put the tst / mov inside the same IT block. IT doesn't snapshot the actual flag condition, it snapshots which predicate, so flag-setting instructions inside an IT block can have an effect on later instructions in the same block. (I think this is right, but I'm not 100% sure).

tiny_input:    ; r0 = n,  flags set according to n-3
    ITET EQ
    moveq  r0, #6
    cmpne  r0, #0
    moveq  r0, #1

Or there's 16-bit cbnz to conditionally jump over a mov r0, #1. But the branch target must be from 4 to 130 bytes after the cbnz, so we can't jump over just a single 16-bit instruction, apparently!


Code-size for my version:

$ arm-none-eabi-gcc -g -c -mcpu=cortex-a9 arm-fact.S
$ arm-none-eabi-objdump -drwC arm-fact.o 

arm-fact.o:     file format elf32-littlearm


Disassembly of section .text:

00000000 <fact>:
   0:   1ec3            subs    r3, r0, #3
   2:   d90b            bls.n   1c <.tiny_input>
   4:   1e82            subs    r2, r0, #2
   6:   1e41            subs    r1, r0, #1

00000008 <.loop>:
   8:   fb10 f002       smulbb  r0, r0, r2
   c:   3a02            subs    r2, #2
   e:   fb11 f103       smulbb  r1, r1, r3
  12:   3b02            subs    r3, #2
  14:   dcf8            bgt.n   8 <.loop>
  16:   fb10 f001       smulbb  r0, r0, r1
  1a:   4770            bx      lr

0000001c <.tiny_input>:
  1c:   bf08            it      eq
  1e:   2006            moveq   r0, #6
  20:   4770            bx      lr

So it's 0x22 bytes for this function. (Or 0x26 if we want to handle 0! = 1.)

It's larger than your version (your byte count includes some constants in memory, and the mov instructions to produce input), but in theory maybe better than twice as fast for large input, on CPUs with pipelined multipliers). And maybe much faster for inputs from 1 to 3, where it just branches once and produces the result.


You probably don't have anything like a Cortex-A9, because your 1.1 microseconds = 22 clock cycles means a 20MHz clock speed, while Cortex-A9 was available in 0.8 to 2GHz.

So maybe you have a much simpler in-order core like Cortex M3? M3 does support the mul instruction, and Thumb2 mode. And wikipedia says its multiply is 1 cycle! So that's weird, I'm surprised it has that efficient a multiplier. Or just that it clocks so slowly that there's time for a lot of gate delays in 1 stage, and it's only a 3-stage pipeline.


Cortex-M3 version:

subs and muls are single-cycle on Cortex-M3. I haven't found perf numbers on branches, but they're common so I'm assuming it's probably 1 cycle and doesn't cause a big fetch bubble (if correctly predicted...). The Cortex-M3 HTML manual has a section on Branch target forwarding which appears to be about reducing the fetch bubble.

Its instruction timing table shows b<cond> costs 1 cycle for not-taken, or 2 cycles for taken. (1 for the branch, 1 for the pipeline reload after an immediate displacement.). So taken branches are slow compared to sub/mul and unrolling would be valuable, so my code above should still work well. (But multiple product accumulators are not necessary, so it can be simplified).

Optimizing for code-size:

;; UNTESTED
THUMB

;; Input: n in r0.   (n is signed positive, otherwise we return n.)
;; Output: n! in r0.
;; clobbers: r1
fact:
    subs   r1, r0, #1     ; i = n-1
    bls   .Ltiny_input    ; jump if n<=1

.Lloop:                 ; do {
    muls    r0, r1         ; prod *= i
    subs    r1, #1         ; --i
    bgt     .Lloop      ; while(--i > 0);  signed condition
    ; r1 = 0, r0 = n! 
    ; last multiply was a redundant prod *= 1 but avoiding that would take a cmp
.Ltiny_input:   ; alternate return path for tiny inputs
    ; 0! = 1 case is not handled, nor are negative inputs


    bx lr    ; or inline this

I think that's the smallest we can manage. The loop has 3 instructions, and probably costs 4 cycles per iteration (1 + 1 + 2, the taken branch costing 2 cycles).

00000000 <fact>:
   0:   1e41            subs    r1, r0, #1
   2:   d902            bls.n   a <fact+0xa>
   4:   4348            muls    r0, r1
   6:   3901            subs    r1, #1
   8:   dcfc            bgt.n   4 <fact+0x4>
   a:   4770            bx      lr           # don't count this if inlining

So this is 0xa = 10 bytes, not counting the bx lr return instruction.

We could handle the 0! = 1 case with an IT block after the first subs, before the branch, so we can still jump to right after the loop (instead of to a separate block like my Cortex-A9 version). You could use this trick for it, too, though.

    subs   r1, r0, #1     ; i = n-1
    it lt
    movlt  r0, #1         ; n = 1 for  n<1
    bls   .Ltiny_input    ; return n if n was <=1

If we needed more range for the branch, we could use itt ls / movls r0, #1, so the branch was inside the IT block (where branch instructions can use an encoding that spends more bits on displacement and none on the predicate). But it's a short range in this case, so I chose to leave r0 unmodified in the r0 == 1 case. I don't know if there are any CPUs where it's more efficient or lower latency for a predicated instruction to be a NOP instead of running, but there might be.


Without unrolling, putting a cmp in the loop to avoid the last *=1 iteration would cost us an extra cycle per iteration (4 cycles instead of 3), so only pay for itself with n=2 or maybe n=3.

Unrolling could help speed significantly for larger inputs, going from 1 mul per 3 cycles to asymptotically approaching 1 mul per 2 cycles (sub + mul + amortized loop overhead). I can't see any way to avoid an instruction like sub or mov to generate a separate input for each mul, except by hard-coding special case sequences for each n (like *2 * 4 = *8 = left shift by 3) when you could instead just hard-code the answer.

3
  • Thanks for the response and you are right I am using the Cortex M3, sorry for not specifying earlier, is there any way you could explain your answer in the context of using the Cortex M3, as I am still quite confused with what you have written. Apr 10 '19 at 20:09
  • 1
    @Hysteria103: most of it doesn't apply to Cortex M3 at all. Its multiplier isn't pipelined (and muls is no slower than smulbb), and the CPU isn't superscalar, so there's no benefit to creating ILP. All you can do is reduce the amount of non-multiply instructions, e.g. by unrolling to reduce loop overhead, and as ensc shows by using subs to set flags as you count down. Apr 10 '19 at 20:38
  • 1
    @Hysteria103: added a Cortex-M3 section to my answer, code-golfed down to 0xa = 10 bytes :P I didn't get around to looking for a good perf / size tradeoff for M3 where taken branches cost as much as the loop body. We can probably use the same i-=2 unrolling as my 2-accumulator loop with maybe simpler setup. Or maybe something like handling odd/even n up front with a conditional mul to start with, so we know how the loop will end... Lots of fun stuff you could do, depending on what tradeoff between size and perf you're looking for. Apr 10 '19 at 22:23
2

Combining r1 and r2 is the obvious solution which you get too when cheating with a c compiler...

unsigned int foo(unsigned int a)
{
        unsigned int    res = 1;

        while (a > 0) {
                res *= a;
                --a;
        }

        return res;
}

translates to

    subs    r3, r0, #0
    mov     r0, #1
    bxeq    lr
1:  mul     r0, r3, r0
    subs    r3, r3, #1
    bne     1b
    bx      lr
2

If you'd like a summary then skip to the end.

I ran this on an STM32 blue pill, a STM32F103C8T6.

Definitely expect results to change with different chips even if they have the same rev of cortex-m3 as the processor is one thing but what feeds it and how is another and that is vendor specific. Also at times the chip vendor can compile the core differently, sometimes they can have multicycle multiplies to save on chip real estate, some cores they can pick between fetching 16 bits at a time or 32. Benchmarks are often easy to muck with so take them with a grain of salt.

I have seen execution in sram be faster than from flash generally. ST though, sometimes not, I don't think on these ancient cortex-m3s that they have their (instruction) cache with some fancy name. Newer ones do and you can't turn it off.

Other chip vendors don't have this and will for cores that support it implement arms caches rather than their own (or have neither). Perhaps why the first two experiments below run at a different time (two digit number up front is hex, the systick timer counts, systick cvr address is passed in in r0. You can see I used a nop to change the alignment of the loop. The arm documentation didn't state in the usual place that the cortex-m3 fetches halfwords or words, but the ST documentation when talking about something else states word fetches. Your four instruction loop is two words but aligned not on a word boundary means it needs to fetch three words per loop. Where if those four words are aligned then it needs to fetch two words per loop, will let Peter or someone else count instructions for this/your code. I am sure that is a factor but there are perhaps others, probably not.

For this chip running from flash is much faster. You can see the affects of turning off STs prefetch, and adding wait states.

000 Zero wait state, if 0 < SYSCLK≤ 24 MHz
001 One wait state, if 24 MHz < SYSCLK ≤ 48 MHz
010 Two wait states, if 48 MHz < SYSCLK ≤ 72 MHz

So while I am running off the internal 8mhz clock, there are two measurements here one is the number of clocks it takes to do something, if we triple the sysclk to 24mhz, the number of clocks should not change. The wall clock duration of each sysclk cycle is a third of the time so wall clock time is faster. Real time performance is better. Following those rules go, go one step above 24Mhz and now you add a wait state, and your code now slows down again. As the number of system clocks to run the code has now slowed down. Now if you double that to 48Mhz, has that overcome the wait state? Probably but for each program/loop there is a point between 24Mhz + a smidge and 48Mhz catches up to right at 24Mhz performance. And 48Mhz plus a smidge now you slow down again and somewhere between 48Mhz plus a smidge an 72Mhz we hopefully catch up to and pass the 48Mhz performance.

Just like the flash cannot keep up, other peripherals have rules, esp with these older chips like many of the cortex-m3 based ones, there are other performance cliffs you fall off, some peripherals cannot run as fast as whatever sysclk is so you might have some other speed X where you are at the max speed for one/some of your peripherals or peripheral busses, and X + smidge you have to halve the clock as that is your smallest divisor now your peripherals and/or their busses are now half speed so performance of your code falls off a cliff possibly worse than half. This code of yours doesn't-ish touch a peripheral. It does use multiply which is risky for performance, but for the cortex-m3 I didn't see that there was a compile time option for single cycle vs other, it just said single cycle.

Peter covered the obvious optimization, whenever you are counting up to some number, if the instruction set allows, and your code, which it does in this case because a * b * c = c * b * a, so you want to count down and use the flags to compare with zero or plus minus if that floats your boat, rather than increment and then have to do a compare before the conditional. When you skip to the end you will see that it was faster (fewer clocks).

The M3's don't have caches, the m4s and m7s do. So running this code with its small loop, would want to be wrapped by a run many times loop and time that to see the affects of caching and cache line alignment and such. But for the m3, one time through is fine (if the chip doesn't have a hidden cache you can't control).

I am only really interested in the loop here as that has the most potential for cycle-stealers. Validating/limiting the input, checking for shortcuts, looking for overflow when multiplying, etc, not something this answer is worrying about.

I recommend you google look for Michael Abrash's books. Zen of Assembly for example which you can build a copy on GitHub. I read it when it came out and I have pretty much used what I learned there since, debugging chips, tools, breaking stuff, improving performance, etc. The 8088/86 was obsolete when it came out and if you think its an x86 book you are completely missing the point. For example my assumption of sram is going to be faster, didn't happen here. I also tried things like adding nops (extra instructions) inside the loop, believe it or not there are times when that can make the performance of a loop faster. These short pipeline, small prefetch processors though that generally isn't the case.

Sometimes you can get free instructions in a loop, the number of clocks is the same even with more instructions. For example if this had a multi-clock multiply, depending on how many clocks and depending on what registers/resources you touch you might get some free instructions in that loop. This appears to be a single cycle multiply so can't hope for that here.

Then there is the pipeline stuff you read in the Patterson and Hennessy text books. Which registers you choose can affect the performance. Order of instructions if you can functionally re-arrange the instructions, etc.

Notes taken doing simple experiments

15
20000018 <fact>:
20000018:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
2000001a:   2100        movs    r1, #0
2000001c:   2203        movs    r2, #3
2000001e:   2301        movs    r3, #1
20000020:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

20000022 <fact_loop>:
20000022:   3101        adds    r1, #1
20000024:   434b        muls    r3, r1
20000026:   4291        cmp r1, r2
20000028:   d4fb        bmi.n   20000022 <fact_loop>
2000002a:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
2000002c:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
2000002e:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
20000030:   4770        bx  lr



12
20000018 <fact>:
20000018:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
2000001a:   2100        movs    r1, #0
2000001c:   2203        movs    r2, #3
2000001e:   2301        movs    r3, #1
20000020:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
20000022:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

20000024 <fact_loop>:
20000024:   3101        adds    r1, #1
20000026:   434b        muls    r3, r1
20000028:   4291        cmp r1, r2
2000002a:   d4fb        bmi.n   20000024 <fact_loop>
2000002c:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
2000002e:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
20000030:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
20000032:   4770        bx  lr





15
20000018 <fact>:
20000018:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
2000001a:   2100        movs    r1, #0
2000001c:   2203        movs    r2, #3
2000001e:   2301        movs    r3, #1
20000020:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
20000022:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
20000024:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

20000026 <fact_loop>:
20000026:   3101        adds    r1, #1
20000028:   434b        muls    r3, r1
2000002a:   4291        cmp r1, r2
2000002c:   d4fb        bmi.n   20000026 <fact_loop>
2000002e:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
20000030:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
20000032:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
20000034:   4770        bx  lr
20000036:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)


12
20000018 <fact>:
20000018:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
2000001a:   2100        movs    r1, #0
2000001c:   2203        movs    r2, #3
2000001e:   2301        movs    r3, #1
20000020:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
20000022:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
20000024:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
20000026:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

20000028 <fact_loop>:
20000028:   3101        adds    r1, #1
2000002a:   434b        muls    r3, r1
2000002c:   4291        cmp r1, r2
2000002e:   d4fb        bmi.n   20000028 <fact_loop>
20000030:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
20000032:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
20000034:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
20000036:   4770        bx  lr





55
20000018 <fact>:
20000018:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
2000001a:   2100        movs    r1, #0
2000001c:   220b        movs    r2, #11
2000001e:   2301        movs    r3, #1
20000020:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

20000022 <fact_loop>:
20000022:   3101        adds    r1, #1
20000024:   434b        muls    r3, r1
20000026:   4291        cmp r1, r2
20000028:   d4fb        bmi.n   20000022 <fact_loop>
2000002a:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
2000002c:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
2000002e:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
20000030:   4770        bx  lr
20000032:   bf00        nop




42
20000018 <fact>:
20000018:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
2000001a:   2100        movs    r1, #0
2000001c:   220b        movs    r2, #11
2000001e:   2301        movs    r3, #1
20000020:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
20000022:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

20000024 <fact_loop>:
20000024:   3101        adds    r1, #1
20000026:   434b        muls    r3, r1
20000028:   4291        cmp r1, r2
2000002a:   d4fb        bmi.n   20000024 <fact_loop>
2000002c:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
2000002e:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
20000030:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
20000032:   4770        bx  lr


41
20000018 <fact>:
20000018:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
2000001a:   210b        movs    r1, #11
2000001c:   2301        movs    r3, #1
2000001e:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

20000020 <fact_loop>:
20000020:   434b        muls    r3, r1
20000022:   3901        subs    r1, #1
20000024:   d1fc        bne.n   20000020 <fact_loop>
20000026:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
20000028:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
2000002a:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
2000002c:   4770        bx  lr
2000002e:   bf00        nop



42
20000018 <fact>:
20000018:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
2000001a:   210b        movs    r1, #11
2000001c:   2301        movs    r3, #1
2000001e:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
20000020:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

20000022 <fact_loop>:
20000022:   434b        muls    r3, r1
20000024:   3901        subs    r1, #1
20000026:   d1fc        bne.n   20000022 <fact_loop>
20000028:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
2000002a:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
2000002c:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
2000002e:   4770        bx  lr



41
20000018 <fact>:
20000018:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
2000001a:   210b        movs    r1, #11
2000001c:   2301        movs    r3, #1
2000001e:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
20000020:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
20000022:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

20000024 <fact_loop>:
20000024:   434b        muls    r3, r1
20000026:   3901        subs    r1, #1
20000028:   d1fc        bne.n   20000024 <fact_loop>
2000002a:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
2000002c:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
2000002e:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
20000030:   4770        bx  lr
20000032:   bf00        nop





FLASH ACR 0x30

2d

08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

08000028 <fact_loop>:
 8000028:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002a:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002c:   d1fc        bne.n   8000028 <fact_loop>
 800002e:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000030:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000032:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000034:   4770        bx  lr


2d

08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
 8000028:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

0800002a <fact_loop>:
 800002a:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002c:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002e:   d1fc        bne.n   800002a <fact_loop>
 8000030:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000032:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000034:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000036:   4770        bx  lr



 FLASH_ACR 0x00

2d

08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
 8000028:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

0800002a <fact_loop>:
 800002a:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002c:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002e:   d1fc        bne.n   800002a <fact_loop>
 8000030:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000032:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000034:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000036:   4770        bx  lr


FLASH_ACR 0x02


5e
08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

08000028 <fact_loop>:
 8000028:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002a:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002c:   d1fc        bne.n   8000028 <fact_loop>
 800002e:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000030:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000032:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000034:   4770        bx  lr

5f
08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
 8000028:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

0800002a <fact_loop>:
 800002a:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002c:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002e:   d1fc        bne.n   800002a <fact_loop>
 8000030:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000032:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000034:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000036:   4770        bx  lr


FLASH_ACR 0x32

41


08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

08000028 <fact_loop>:
 8000028:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002a:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002c:   d1fc        bne.n   8000028 <fact_loop>
 800002e:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000030:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000032:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000034:   4770        bx  lr

 41

08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
 8000028:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

0800002a <fact_loop>:
 800002a:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002c:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002e:   d1fc        bne.n   800002a <fact_loop>
 8000030:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000032:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000034:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000036:   4770        bx  lr


    PUT32(FLASH_ACR,0x3A);



41
08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

08000028 <fact_loop>:
 8000028:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002a:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002c:   d1fc        bne.n   8000028 <fact_loop>
 800002e:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000030:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000032:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000034:   4770        bx  lr
    ...

41
08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
 8000028:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

0800002a <fact_loop>:
 800002a:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002c:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002e:   d1fc        bne.n   800002a <fact_loop>
 8000030:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000032:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000034:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000036:   4770        bx  lr







flash acr 0x32


4c
08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

08000028 <fact_loop>:
 8000028:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
 800002a:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002c:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002e:   d1fb        bne.n   8000028 <fact_loop>
 8000030:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000032:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000034:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000036:   4770        bx  lr



4c

08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
 8000028:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

0800002a <fact_loop>:
 800002a:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
 800002c:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002e:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 8000030:   d1fb        bne.n   800002a <fact_loop>
 8000032:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000034:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000036:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000038:   4770        bx  lr


flash acr 0x30


38
08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

08000028 <fact_loop>:
 8000028:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
 800002a:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002c:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002e:   d1fb        bne.n   8000028 <fact_loop>
 8000030:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000032:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000034:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000036:   4770        bx  lr


3b
0800002c <fact_loop>:
 800002c:   d002        beq.n   8000034 <fact_done>
 800002e:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 8000030:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 8000032:   e7fb        b.n 800002c <fact_loop>

08000034 <fact_done>:
 8000034:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000036:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000038:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 800003a:   4770        bx  lr






38

08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   2100        movs    r1, #0
 8000024:   220b        movs    r2, #11
 8000026:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000028:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

0800002a <fact_loop>:
 800002a:   3101        adds    r1, #1
 800002c:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002e:   4291        cmp r1, r2
 8000030:   d4fb        bmi.n   800002a <fact_loop>
 8000032:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000034:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000036:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000038:   4770        bx  lr



38
08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   2100        movs    r1, #0
 8000024:   220b        movs    r2, #11
 8000026:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000028:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)
 800002a:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

0800002c <fact_loop>:
 800002c:   3101        adds    r1, #1
 800002e:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 8000030:   4291        cmp r1, r2
 8000032:   d4fb        bmi.n   800002c <fact_loop>
 8000034:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000036:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000038:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 800003a:   4770        bx  lr





2d


08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

08000028 <fact_loop>:
 8000028:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002a:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002c:   d1fc        bne.n   8000028 <fact_loop>
 800002e:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000030:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000032:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000034:   4770        bx  lr

Skip to here

Note that I changed the number of loops, the input value from 3 to 11.

With zero wait states on the flash and prefetch enabled, your loop:

38
08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   2100        movs    r1, #0
 8000024:   220b        movs    r2, #11
 8000026:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000028:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

0800002a <fact_loop>:
 800002a:   3101        adds    r1, #1
 800002c:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002e:   4291        cmp r1, r2
 8000030:   d4fb        bmi.n   800002a <fact_loop>
 8000032:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000034:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000036:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000038:   4770        bx  lr

That means 0x38 systick clocks between the two ldr instructions. Alignment didn't affect this in flash.

If you use Peter's or a variation on it (bne makes more sense to me than plus minus, YMMV):

2d
08000020 <fact>:
 8000020:   b430        push    {r4, r5}
 8000022:   210b        movs    r1, #11
 8000024:   2301        movs    r3, #1
 8000026:   6804        ldr r4, [r0, #0]

08000028 <fact_loop>:
 8000028:   434b        muls    r3, r1
 800002a:   3901        subs    r1, #1
 800002c:   d1fc        bne.n   8000028 <fact_loop>
 800002e:   6805        ldr r5, [r0, #0]
 8000030:   1b60        subs    r0, r4, r5
 8000032:   bc30        pop {r4, r5}
 8000034:   4770        bx  lr

Alignment didn't affect this loop either. It is fewer instructions, as well as faster.

So from an other answer and the documentation mul and sub one clock each the branch when taken is 2 clocks according to that answer, so 4 clocks per loop times 11 is 44 clocks or 0x2C. No doubt the two ldrs have a cost perhaps that is where the additional two clocks come from. Or it could be how the prefetch unit works or other.

Your loop is 5 clocks or 55 or 0x37, same answer for the extra two clocks being measured.

So I overcomplicated some of these experiments, the prefetch unit from ST and running at zero wait states allowed us to see the performance shown in ARM's documentation. Counting down instead of up saved an instruction in the loop which is both smaller in size and faster, which is what you were asking for.

Your 5 clocks per loop times 3 factorial means 14 clocks (5+5+4), your 22 clocks (check how you measured it, very often the ruler is the problem with benchmarking not the code) have 8 clocks somewhere else minus the 3 for the setup instructions if you were counting those. Whatever ruler you are using if you use the count down solution, see how that compares on your system. Saves a couple of instructions, one in and one outside the loop.

Edit

I am somewhat surprised that gcc didn't optimize this into a count down loop. I only tried one version maybe an older 3.x or 4.x might have. Also if you build for cortex-m3 it uses a thumb2 instruction rather than the thumb instruction.

unsigned int fact ( unsigned int x )
{
    unsigned int a;
    unsigned int rb;
    a=1;
    for(rb=1;rb<=x;rb++)
    {
        a*=rb;
    }
    return(a);
}
unsigned int fact2 ( unsigned int x )
{
    unsigned int a;
    a=1;
    while(x)
    {
        a*=x--;
    }
    return(a);
}

Yes I could optimize the C code further....

Disassembly of section .text:

00000000 <fact>:
   0:   b140        cbz r0, 14 <fact+0x14>
   2:   2301        movs    r3, #1
   4:   461a        mov r2, r3
   6:   fb03 f202   mul.w   r2, r3, r2
   a:   3301        adds    r3, #1
   c:   4298        cmp r0, r3
   e:   d2fa        bcs.n   6 <fact+0x6>
  10:   4610        mov r0, r2
  12:   4770        bx  lr
  14:   2201        movs    r2, #1
  16:   4610        mov r0, r2
  18:   4770        bx  lr
  1a:   bf00        nop

0000001c <fact2>:
  1c:   4603        mov r3, r0
  1e:   2001        movs    r0, #1
  20:   b123        cbz r3, 2c <fact2+0x10>
  22:   fb03 f000   mul.w   r0, r3, r0
  26:   3b01        subs    r3, #1
  28:   d1fb        bne.n   22 <fact2+0x6>
  2a:   4770        bx  lr
  2c:   4770        bx  lr
  2e:   bf00        nop

I forgot about cbz, I don't use thumb2 unless I have to, not as universally portable as classic thumb instructions...

More portable version:

Disassembly of section .text:

00000000 <fact>:
   0:   2800        cmp r0, #0
   2:   d007        beq.n   14 <fact+0x14>
   4:   2301        movs    r3, #1
   6:   2201        movs    r2, #1
   8:   435a        muls    r2, r3
   a:   3301        adds    r3, #1
   c:   4298        cmp r0, r3
   e:   d2fb        bcs.n   8 <fact+0x8>
  10:   0010        movs    r0, r2
  12:   4770        bx  lr
  14:   2201        movs    r2, #1
  16:   e7fb        b.n 10 <fact+0x10>

00000018 <fact2>:
  18:   0003        movs    r3, r0
  1a:   2001        movs    r0, #1
  1c:   2b00        cmp r3, #0
  1e:   d003        beq.n   28 <fact2+0x10>
  20:   4358        muls    r0, r3
  22:   3b01        subs    r3, #1
  24:   2b00        cmp r3, #0
  26:   d1fb        bne.n   20 <fact2+0x8>
  28:   4770        bx  lr
  2a:   46c0        nop         ; (mov r8, r8)

Hmmmm:

  20:   4358        muls    r0, r3
  22:   3b01        subs    r3, #1
  24:   2b00        cmp r3, #0
  26:   d1fb        bne.n   20 <fact2+0x8>

wow.

arm-none-eabi-gcc --version
arm-none-eabi-gcc (GCC) 8.3.0
Copyright (C) 2018 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
5
  • Thanks for posting this; I wondered about instruction fetch after posting my answer. I guess I should edit the Cortex-M3 section in my answer to say that my static analysis is assuming 0 wait-states and prefetch. I guess with a 3-instruction loop of only 16-bit instructions, alignment won't matter because either way you have one half and one whole word? Or does it help to have the first pair be a whole word? Apr 11 '19 at 7:46
  • @PeterCordes my guess is the first pair doesnt matter. Although, would need to come across one of the other cortex-ms that has been configured for half word fetches and then try something to see if there is an alignment issue there. But really why would you build for halfword fetches unless your bus is 16 bits wide and why would you build with a 16 bit wide bus.
    – old_timer
    Apr 11 '19 at 14:30
  • I have resisted the urge to sign up for a trial period with their logic I dont want to actually see it and then be permanently restricted from saying or doing things. So I can only speculate that the additional clock per loop is the alignment thing. ST has their logic to try to smooth out the flash, and ditto I dont know exactly what that looks like either, but a branch still has to mess with a prefetcher...
    – old_timer
    Apr 11 '19 at 14:32
  • arm and st talk about the m3 core having some sort of branch prediction, but not sure how to stimulate that, with the larger cores that fetch multiple instructions per fetch transaction you can mess with that there is a sweet spot where you can move your end of loop branch and enable and disable branch prediction and see the clock or two savings. the cortex-ms from what I can tell are one word at a time or one halfword at a time, with tiny pipes so I cant see a real branch prediction doing much, well the cache type would still work.
    – old_timer
    Apr 11 '19 at 14:34
  • 1
    Based on other answers and comments, the fastest is actually a table since the only results that fit in a 32 bit result are 0 through 12, that takes more bytes overall but is both fast and consistent as 1! and 12! should take the same number of clock cycles.
    – old_timer
    Apr 11 '19 at 14:57
1

Something like this coould be used: (assuming 32 bit registers, where 12! is largest possible value), but Peter Cordes is more familiar with the ARM (it's been 10 years since I worked with ARM), and his code based answer is good. The table lookup I show below should be fastest, and it requires more space, but not a lot since the range is 0! to 12! for 32 bit unsigned integers.

        mov     r2,#3      ;r2 = n
;       ...
        mov     r3,#1
        sub     r2,#2
        blo     factx
        mov     r1,#(fact11-fact12)
        mul     r1,r2,r1          ; or better, use a left-shift by 2 or 3 and an assemble time static assert that fact11-fact12 == 4 or 8
        adr     r2,fact2
        sub     r2,r2,r1
        mov     r1,#2
        b       r2            

fact12  mul     r3,r1,r3
        add     r1,r1,#1
fact11  mul     r3,r1,r3
        add     r1,r1,#1
        mul     r3,r1,r3
        add     r1,r1,#1
        mul     r3,r1,r3
        add     r1,r1,#1
        mul     r3,r1,r3
        add     r1,r1,#1
        mul     r3,r1,r3
        add     r1,r1,#1
        mul     r3,r1,r3
        add     r1,r1,#1
        mul     r3,r1,r3
        add     r1,r1,#1
        mul     r3,r1,r3
        add     r1,r1,#1
        mul     r3,r1,r3
        add     r1,r1,#1
fact2   mul     r3,r1,r3
factx   ...                  ;r3 = n!

or simpler still, a table lookup:

tblfac  dcd     1,1,2,6,24,120,720,5040
        dcd     40320,362880,3628800,39916800
        dcd     479001600 
;       ...
        mov     r2,#3                    ;r2 = n

        adr     r3,tblfac
        ldr     r3,[r3, r2, lsl #2]      ;r3 = n!
8
  • mul presumably has multi-cycle latency, so fully unrolling with only one accumulator doesn't remove that bottleneck. Also, ARM allows indexed addressing modes with a shifted index, so something like ldr r3, [r3 + r2 lsl #2] avoids the add. Apr 10 '19 at 4:38
  • @PeterCordes - Thanks, I updated my answer. I last worked with ARM about 10 years ago, ARM v4. I don't know how many cycles mul would take on current ARMs. The table lookup should be fast, but I don't know if that is allowed for this problem.
    – rcgldr
    Apr 10 '19 at 7:49
  • Well the OP mentions code size, so it looks like they're interesting in optimizing the tradeoff between size and performance. A table lookup is at one end of the spectrum. If they care about large inputs that might overflow, maybe LUT for every 4th n and loop on the low bits. But anyway, I had guessed that most ARMs would have pipelined multipliers, but they might be on a Cortex-M which either has 1-cycle (faster, larger die), or 32-cycle (smaller die, iterative) multipliers. See the bottom of my answer. But I found numbers for Cortex-A9 which I wrote my answer around... Apr 10 '19 at 8:03
  • Letting the assembler compute a multiplier is interesting, but bad for performance and code-size vs. sub r1, r2 lsl #2. I don't think there's a version of mul or muls that supports an immediate, though. keil.com/support/man/docs/armasm/armasm_dom1361289882394.htm only documents a register source. (And muls is 2 bytes in Thumb mode, vs. 4 for mul). Apr 10 '19 at 8:08
  • @PeterCordes - I updated my answer to eliminate the mul with constants. The table lookup should be the fastest. Is ldr r3,[r3+r2 lsl #2] available in thumb mode?
    – rcgldr
    Apr 10 '19 at 12:36

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