-2

When I run my code with test case find("mississippi", "sip"), it prints out "sippi" and then "false" below. I was confused about this because I was under the assumption that "true" would be printed.

I've tried removing the return statement within the if body but get an error

public static boolean find (String text, String str) //method to find "str" within "text"
    {
        if (text.substring(0, str.length()).equals(str))
        {
            System.out.println(text);
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            text = text.substring(1);
            find(text, str);
            System.out.println(text);
            return false;
        }
    }

I expect the output to be sippi true, but the actual output is sippi false

3

You're not using the boolean returned by the recursive calls to find(...), so your function currently always returns false if the first if evaluates to false. An additional base case is needed to return false when appropriate:

public static boolean find (String text, String str) {
    if (text.length() < str.length()) { return false; }

    if (text.substring(0, str.length()).equals(str))
    {
        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        text = text.substring(1);
        return find(text, str);
    }
}
  • Minor detail: one could add if (text.length() < str,length()) return false as the first line to avoid an index-out-of-bounds exception on too-short input. The test on text.length() == 0 could then be removed as redundant. – another-dave Apr 10 at 1:01
  • @another-dave Edited, thanks. – user4020527 Apr 10 at 1:03
1

You recursively work your way down until you get a match for "sip" and print out "sippi". The innermost call then returns true. That takes you out to the next level, after the call to find(), and there you print out "sippi" again. This call then returns false. That takes you out to the next level, after the call to find(), and there you print out "isippi". This call then returns false... and so on.

I see nothing that prints "true" or "false".

This seems to be a common misunderstanding of recursion. People get the nested-call part, but not the nested-return. Each return only exits the current level of call, not the entire call stack.

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