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I have a class in C# that starts quite a few complex operations.

Each of these operations are encapsulated in their own class for readability and the main class is doing something like this:

var A = new StartProcessX();
var B = new StartProcessY();

etc... each of these objects is starting systems with callbacks, etc so they just need to be initialized and they're self-sufficient in a way.

The alternative is to put it all in one partial class, but it's a mess very quickly.

Is there a nice way to structure this for readability?

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    Are you saying that the constructor itself starts background work? What a bad design. Constructors are for creating objects, not launching background operations. – Camilo Terevinto Apr 10 '19 at 15:08
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    It's not really clear to me what you're asking. Do you just not need to store these objects in variables? You don't have to use those variables for anything later, or even declare them at all. Maybe these shouldn't be objects at all and just static methods? It's not really clear to me what the design is trying to accomplish or what the problem is. – David Apr 10 '19 at 15:09
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    @Thomas It makes a huge difference, it shows the intent of starting/running something – Camilo Terevinto Apr 10 '19 at 15:12
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    Introduce base class with an abstract Start() method, inherit, keep List<BaseClass> around. (Or just use Task, as it seems that's what they are anyway.) "But I don't need them!" Oh, you will, even if only for debugging later. Objects that run off into the distance to do things in space, unreachable to anyone but the threads they've happened to spawn, are really not a good idea. – Jeroen Mostert Apr 10 '19 at 15:12
  • @JeroenMostert: actually this could make the whole thing looking cleaner. The system is capturing a lot of financial quotes, so it's a large amount of functions that just listen to a message, parse it, do a callback and nothing else; I'm trying to make that look cleaner; It goes similar to what Camilo was saying above and thinking about it, I think it'll improve readability. – Thomas Apr 10 '19 at 15:14
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var A = new StartProcessX();
var B = new StartProcessY();

Be very careful with this, I had a piece of code that created a timer with an interval of a couple of seconds to defer reading a result, and what happened under heavy load is the garbage collector actually collected my timer and called Dispose on it, and all I saw was that some network packets weren't being processed. Took a bit of debugging to figure out what went wrong.

Even if you don't actually need these objects, root them to your main class (probably your main form) so they share its lifetime.

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  • ok, this is very important; thanks for letting me know! – Thomas Apr 10 '19 at 16:33
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Starting background work in a constructor is very poor design. That said there is absolutely nothing stopping your from just calling new without capturing the returned object.

new StartProcessX();
new StartProcessY();

vs

var A = new StartProcessX();
var B = new StartProcessY();

A better approach would be creating the objects and keeping references to them for either canceling the tasks or knowing when they are finished.

class Program {
    private static StartProcessX _startProcessX;
    private static StartProcessY _startProcessY;

    public static Main {
        _startProcessX = new StartProcessX;
        _startProcessY = new StartProcessY;

        _startProcessX.Start();
        _startProcessY.Start();

        // do something
        while ( running ) {

        } 
        Exit();
    }

    public static void Exit () {
        _startProcessX.Cancel();
        _startProcessY.Cancel();
    } 
}

Edit in response to comment below.

If that is too verbose then consider registering them. Perhaps this would better suite your situation.

abstract class Process {
    abstract void Start();
    abstract void Stop();
}
class Program {
    private static Dictionary<Type, Process> Processes;

    public static Main {

        // Initialize all 40 objects
        Processes = new Dictionary <Type, Process> () {
            { typeof(ProcessX), new ProcessX },
            { typeof(ProcessY), new ProcessY }
        };

        // Start them all. This could be moved to a function.
        foreach ( var process in Processes ) {
            process.Start();
        }
        while ( running ) {

        } 

        // Stop or cancel a specific process by type.
        Stop<ProcessX>();

        // or stop all processes
        foreach( var process in Processes ) {
            process.Stop();
        }
    }

    public static void Stop<T> () {
        if ( Processes.TryGetValue ( typeof(T), out Process process) ) {
            process.Stop();
        }
    }
}
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  • that's how it all started, but now there is over 40 of these objects and it becomes much less clear than new ProcessX(), new ProcessY(), etc. – Thomas Apr 10 '19 at 15:22
  • Hey, I updated my answer to better suite your situation. – Dan Barrett Apr 10 '19 at 15:36
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I would suggest creating a disposable service manager:

class ServiceManager : IDisposable
{

    private IDisposable _startServices()
    {
        var d = new CompositeDisposable();

        new StartProcessX().DisposeWith(d); // those clasess should implement IDisposable and stop the work when disposed
        new StartProcessY().DisposeWith(d);
        new StartProcessZ().DisposeWith(d);

        return d;
    }

    public void StartServices()
    {
       _services = _startServices(); 
      // do some logging or whatever
    }


    public void StopServices()
    {
       _services?.Dispose(); 
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
      StopServices();
    }
}

That way it's very readable, even if there is a lot of services, and easily managable when stopping the services.

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