3

I want to make a c++ program that runs a while loop for a defined amount of time and then exits the loop. Having the loop doing some stuff while running and when the time set is reached it will break out of the loop. For example have the while the loop is running it will keep printing stuff on the screen and when 1 minute has passed it will exit the loop.

#include <iostream>
#include <time.h>


using namespace std;

int main()
{

    time_t now = time(nullptr);
    tm* current_time = localtime(&now);

    int current_minute = current_time->tm_min;

    int defined_minute = current_minute + 1;

    while (current_minute < defined_minute)
    {
        current_minute = current_time->tm_min;
    }
}

I created this code and it was supposed to work but it doesn't, I tried to debug but I still don't understand why it doesn't work.

P.S. this is my first time posting a programming problem online, appreciate if someone tells me how to better put my problems in the future.

9
  • 2
    What do you mean by "it doesn't work"? Commented Apr 10, 2019 at 21:06
  • 3
    Your loop doesn't make sense. None of the variables involved change their value in the loop, so the loop condition is a constant (always true).
    – melpomene
    Commented Apr 10, 2019 at 21:06
  • You need to update now and current_time inside your while loop. If you had put in some logging you would see that it never changes.
    – Dave S
    Commented Apr 10, 2019 at 21:22
  • by "it doesn't work" I mean that the loop will be infinite
    – HBatalha
    Commented Apr 10, 2019 at 22:00

4 Answers 4

3

Here is the simplest answer:

#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>

int
main()
{
    using namespace std;
    using namespace std::chrono;
    auto finish = system_clock::now() + 1min;
    do
    {
        cout << "stuff\n";
    } while (system_clock::now() < finish);
}

This requires C++14 or C++17. If you're using C++11, substitute minutes{1} for 1min. If you're using C++03, <chrono> is not available, and you'll have to use the C API for timing, which is significantly harder to use.

Here is a video tutorial on <chrono>.

6
  • Thanks Howard, very much apprecite your help. I had a peep on the tutorial link you got me, it is a 1 hour video, I will watch it later and I am excited about this library.
    – HBatalha
    Commented Apr 11, 2019 at 9:28
  • I ran the code and it worked beautifully, exactly how I wanted to be. Thank you very much
    – HBatalha
    Commented Apr 11, 2019 at 21:50
  • Hello Howard, I've spent the whole in front of my laptop (yesterday as well) trying to find a way to download a file from dropbox (or any other cloud storage) using c++ with no luck. I posted a question here but noone has yet answered me that completely solved my problem. That is the way I found to contact you. Hope it is not inappropriated, If so I am sorry. if you can help me I would appreciate it. Thank you
    – HBatalha
    Commented Apr 20, 2019 at 20:16
  • I'm not an expert in this area, however I do have code at this link which uses curl to download a file from a website: github.com/HowardHinnant/date/blob/master/src/… Alternatives to curl include boost::asio and boost::beast (which is a layer on top of boost::asio). Commented Apr 21, 2019 at 0:38
  • from what I could understand you are using the boost library as I consider myself still c++ beginner, I prefer not to start using lis library yet, I want to build a stronger backbone/foundation before going I really appreciate you taking your time to answer me on this Howard
    – HBatalha
    Commented Apr 21, 2019 at 12:08
2

Use #include <chrono>

auto t0 = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
while ( (std::chrono::system_clock::now()-t0) < std::chrono::minutes{1})
{
    // do stuff
}
2
  • I ran the code but it exits the loop imediately I dont know why, I never used the <chrono> library, I will dig in a little bit to try to understand it. Thanks
    – HBatalha
    Commented Apr 10, 2019 at 22:11
  • 1
    It probably doesn't appear to work because on most systems, it would only wait until at least 60 nanoseconds have passed. I would drop the count() and compare the difference to std::chrono::minutes{1}. Commented Apr 10, 2019 at 23:30
1

This snippet of code needs C++11 at least and may count somewhat complex C++ objects but here is how I imaginated it

#include <iostream>
#include <future>     //std::async
#include <atomic>
#include <chrono>
#include <sstream>

int main()
{   
    int i = 0;
    std::stringstream sstr;
    std::atomic<bool> do_it(true);

    //store future so that async returns immediately
    //see Notes paragraph on https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/thread/async
    auto fut = std::async(std::launch::async, [&do_it]() {
                                                        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(1000));
                                                        do_it = false;
                                                    });

    //Preemtion could steal some time here...

    while ( do_it )
    {
        sstr << "Iteration: " << ++i << "\n";
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(10));
    }

    std::cout << sstr.str() << "\n" << std::flush;

    std::cout << "Bye\n" << std::flush;
}

The result is ( you can try it on online C++ compiler like coliru)

Iteration: 1
...
Iteration: 95
Iteration: 96
Iteration: 97
Iteration: 98

Bye

Hope it helps

1

Another answer could be the use of condition variable in order to cope with the ugly sleep_for(...) often used like in my first answer leading to only 98 iterations instead of 100 because of the time taken by the application/calculations ( here printing some loop number inside a stringstream ).

Condition Variables can target more than 1 thread

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>
#include <condition_variable>
#include <atomic>
#include <chrono>
#include <sstream>

//From https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/thread/condition_variable/wait_until

int index[2] = { 0 };
std::stringstream sstr;
std::condition_variable cv;
std::mutex cv_m;
std::atomic<bool> do_it(true);

std::mutex mut_print;

void foo(char id, int * index)
{ 
    if ( ! index ) return;

    auto new_tp = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

    while ( do_it )
    {   
        {
            std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(mut_print);
            sstr << "Iteration of "<< id << ": " << ++(*index) << "\n";
        }

        new_tp += std::chrono::milliseconds(10);

        while ( do_it )
        {   
            std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lk(cv_m);
            if(std::cv_status::timeout == cv.wait_until(lk,new_tp ) ) {
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

void signals()
{
    std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(1000));
    do_it = false;
    cv.notify_all();
}

int main()
{   
    std::thread t1(foo,'A',&index[0]),t2(foo,'B',&index[1]),ts(signals);

    t1.join();
    t2.join();
    ts.join();

    std::cout << sstr.str() << "\n" << std::flush;

    std::cout << "Bye\n" << std::flush;
}

coliru

Result is

Iteration of A: 1
Iteration of B: 1
Iteration of A: 2
Iteration of B: 2
...
Iteration of A: 100
Iteration of B: 100
Iteration of A: 101
Iteration of B: 101

Bye

This time we went a little bit to far with 101 iterations but this example does not pretend to execute a limited/given number of times

1
  • As I never used libraries such as <thread>, <condition_variable> and <atomic> this code is a little overwhelming for me. I will have do a little reseach on these ;ibraries and understand it Thank You
    – HBatalha
    Commented Apr 11, 2019 at 21:56

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