Could you explain me the correct manner to manage the UIViewController lifecycle?

In particular, I would like to know how to use Initialize, ViewDidLoad, ViewWillAppear, ViewDidAppear, ViewWillDisappear, ViewDidDisappear, ViewDidUnload and Dispose methods in Mono Touch for a UIViewController class.

12 Answers 12

up vote 347 down vote accepted

All these commands are called automatically at the appropriate times by iOS when you load/present/hide the view controller. It's important to note that these methods are attached to UIViewController and not to UIViews themselves. You won't get any of these features just using a UIView.

There's great documentation on Apple's site here. Putting in simply though:

  • ViewDidLoad - Called when you create the class and load from xib. Great for initial setup and one-time-only work.

  • ViewWillAppear - Called right before your view appears, good for hiding/showing fields or any operations that you want to happen every time before the view is visible. Because you might be going back and forth between views, this will be called every time your view is about to appear on the screen.

  • ViewDidAppear - Called after the view appears - great place to start an animations or the loading of external data from an API.

  • ViewWillDisappear/DidDisappear - Same idea as ViewWillAppear/ViewDidAppear.

  • ViewDidUnload/ViewDidDispose - In Objective C, this is where you do your clean-up and release of stuff, but this is handled automatically so not much you really need to do here.

  • 71
    This text is slightly misleading, as the ViewDidLoad should not be used for one-time-only work. It might be called several times if the view is unloaded due to low memory and then loaded again. – Ricky Helgesson Aug 20 '12 at 14:59
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    ViewDidLoad is not actually called when you create/initialize the view controller. It is called the first time you do anything view related with the view controller's view. Like add it as a subview, set the frame, etc. It is also called of course when loading from a nib. – Jason Grandelli Oct 16 '13 at 13:43
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    Where in the docs is hidden the "viewDidDispose" event? – Floydian May 6 '14 at 13:44
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    ViewDidAppear - Called after the view appears - great place to start an animations or the loading of external data from an API. Why is it a good place to start loading data? Why not viewDidLoad? – Anton Chikin Aug 3 '14 at 5:19
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    what about loadView method, if it is called first time when a nib loaded in memory before viewDidLoad or not. – iHulk Sep 20 '14 at 8:09

The UIViewController lifecycle is diagrammed here:

http://rdkw.wordpress.com/2013/02/24/ios-uiviewcontroller-lifecycle/

A view controller's lifecycle, diagrammed

This is for latest iOS Versions(Modified with Xcode 9.3, Swift 4.1). Below are all the stages which makes the lifecycle of a UIViewController complete.

loadView()

loadViewIfNeeded()

viewDidLoad()

viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool)

viewWillLayoutSubviews()

viewDidLayoutSubviews()

viewDidAppear(_ animated: Bool)

viewWillDisappear(_ animated: Bool)

viewDidDisappear(_ animated: Bool)

Let me explain all those stages.

1. loadView

This event creates the view that the controller manages. It is only called when the view controller is created programmatically. This makes it a good place to create your views in code.

This is where subclasses should create their custom view hierarchy if they aren't using a nib. 
Should never be called directly. 

2. loadViewIfNeeded

If incase the view of current viewController has not been set yet then this method will load the view but remember, this is only available in iOS >=9.0. So if you are supporting iOS <9.0 then don't expect it to come into the picture.

Loads the view controller's view if it has not already been set.

3. viewDidLoad

The viewDidLoad event is only called when the view is created and loaded into memory but the bounds for the view are not defined yet. This is a good place to initialise the objects that the view controller is going to use.

Called after the view has been loaded. For view controllers created in code, this is after -loadView.
For view controllers unarchived from a nib, this is after the view is set.

4. viewWillAppear

This event notifies the viewController whenever the view appears on the screen. In this step the view has bounds that are defined but the orientation is not set.

Called when the view is about to made visible. Default does nothing.

5. viewWillLayoutSubviews

This is the first step in the lifecycle where the bounds are finalised. If you are not using constraints or Auto Layout you probably want to update the subviews here. This is only available in iOS >=5.0. So if you are supporting iOS <5.0 then don't expect it to come into the picture.

Called just before the view controller's view's layoutSubviews method is invoked.
Subclasses can implement as necessary. The default is a nop.

6. viewDidLayoutSubviews

This event notifies the view controller that the subviews have been setup. It is a good place to make any changes to the subviews after they have been set. This is only available in iOS >=5.0. So if you are supporting iOS <5.0 then don't expect it to come into the picture.

Called just after the view controller's view's layoutSubviews method is invoked.
Subclasses can implement as necessary. The default is a nop.

7. viewDidAppear

The viewDidAppear event fires after the view is presented on the screen. Which makes it a good place to get data from a backend service or database.

Called when the view has been fully transitioned onto the screen.
Default does nothing

8. viewWillDisappear

The viewWillDisappear event fires when the view of presented viewController is about to disappear, dismiss, cover or hide behind other viewController. This is a good place where you can restrict your network calls, invalidate timer or release objects which is bound to that viewController.

Called when the view is dismissed, covered or otherwise hidden.

9. viewDidDisappear

This is the last step of the lifecycle that anyone can address as this event fires just after the view of presented viewController has been disappeared, dismissed, covered or hidden.

Called after the view was dismissed, covered or otherwise hidden. 
Default does nothing

Now as per Apple when you are implementing this methods you should remember to call super implementation of that specific method.

If you subclass UIViewController, you must call the super implementation of this
method, even if you aren't using a NIB.  (As a convenience, the default init method will do this for you,
and specify nil for both of this methods arguments.) In the specified NIB, the File's Owner proxy should
have its class set to your view controller subclass, with the view outlet connected to the main view. If you
invoke this method with a nil nib name, then this class' -loadView method will attempt to load a NIB whose
name is the same as your view controller's class. If no such NIB in fact exists then you must either call
-setView: before -view is invoked, or override the -loadView method to set up your views programatically.

Hope this helped. Thanks.

UPDATE - As @ThomasW pointed inside comment viewWillLayoutSubviews and viewDidLayoutSubviews will also be called at other times when subviews of the main view are loaded, for example when cells of a table view or collection view are loaded.

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    viewWillLayoutSubviews and viewDidLayoutSubviews will also be called at other times when subviews of the main view are loaded, for example when cells of a table view or collection view are loaded. – ThomasW Apr 18 '16 at 4:56

iOS 10,11 (Swift 3.1,Swift 4.0)

According to UIViewController in UIKit developers,

1. loadView()

This is where subclasses should create their custom view hierarchy if they aren't using a nib. Should never be called directly.

2. loadViewIfNeeded()

Loads the view controller's view if it has not already been set.

3. viewDidLoad()

Called after the view has been loaded. For view controllers created in code, this is after -loadView. For view controllers unarchived from a nib, this is after the view is set.

4. viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool)

Called when the view is about to made visible. Default does nothing

5. viewWillLayoutSubviews()

Called just after the view controller's view's layoutSubviews method is invoked. Subclasses can implement as necessary.

6. viewDidLayoutSubviews()

Called when the size,position and constraints are applied to the all objects.

7. viewDidAppear(_ animated: Bool)

Called when the view has been fully transitioned onto the screen. Default does nothing

8. viewWillDisappear(_ animated: Bool)

Called when the view is dismissed, covered or otherwise hidden. Default does nothing

9. viewDidDisappear(_ animated: Bool)

Called after the view was dismissed, covered or otherwise hidden. Default does nothing

10. viewWillTransition(to size: CGSize, with coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator)

Called when the view is Transitioning.

11. willMove(toParentViewController parent: UIViewController?)

12. didMove(toParentViewController parent: UIViewController?)

These two methods are public for container subclasses to call when transitioning between child controllers. If they are overridden, the overrides should ensure to call the super.

The parent argument in both of these methods is nil when a child is being removed from its parent; otherwise it is equal to the new parent view controller.

13. didReceiveMemoryWarning()

Called when the parent application receives a memory warning. On iOS 6.0 it will no longer clear the view by default.

  • 2
    It really really sux that stackoverflow won't purge all the wrong and incomplete answers from this entire thread. Your answer seems complete as far as method calls go, so I'm going to assume yours is correct and work with that. – Logicsaurus Rex Sep 24 '17 at 19:16
  • What is a nib as mentioned under loadView? – Petrus Theron Jul 31 at 7:36
  • @PetrusTheron, stackoverflow.com/a/12362022/6479530 – Rajamohan S Jul 31 at 12:38
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    @LogicsaurusRex I agree. In the same way that SO marks questions as duplicates or protected, I think it should be able to mark answers as outdated or obsolete – rmp251 Aug 25 at 18:30

As of iOS 6 and onward. The new diagram is as follows:

enter image description here

  • Call that view "A". Consider a second view "B" that is appearing while "A" disappears. Is "B.viewWillAppear" before or after "A.viewDidDisappear"? And are there any situations where the order of those two changes? – ToolmakerSteve Sep 7 '16 at 9:20
  • Seems like new view's (B) willApear will be called before the disAppears. For second question. Need some time to look into it. – Saad Sep 8 '16 at 7:06

The methods viewWillLayoutSubviews and viewDidLayoutSubviews aren't mentioned in the diagrams, but these are called between viewWillAppear and viewDidAppear. They can be called multiple times.

  • They will also be called at other times when subviews of the main view are loaded, for example when cells of a table view or collection view are loaded. – ThomasW Apr 18 '16 at 4:55

Haider's answer is correct for pre-iOS 6. However, as of iOS 6 viewDidUnload and viewWillUnload are never called. The docs state: "Views are no longer purged under low-memory conditions and so this method is never called."

  • I tried putting a breakpoint in ViewWillDisappear, ViewDidDisappear, Dispose. But none of them were getting invoked when I navigated with PresentViewController() method. What could be the reason ? – Sreeraj Dec 9 '14 at 10:07
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    The link doesn't work ... So what does the OS do under low memory? – Son Dec 2 '15 at 10:57
  • Saves them to disk? – Ian Warburton Aug 6 '16 at 20:12

Let's concentrate on methods, which are responsible for the UIViewController's lifecycle:

  • Creation:

    - (void)init

    - (void)initWithNibName:

  • View creation:

    - (BOOL)isViewLoaded

    - (void)loadView

    - (void)viewDidLoad

    - (UIView *)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame

    - (UIView *)initWithCoder:(NSCoder *)coder

  • Handling of view state changing:

    - (void)viewDidLoad

    - (void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated

    - (void)viewDidAppear:(BOOL)animated

    - (void)viewWillDisappear:(BOOL)animated

    - (void)viewDidDisappear:(BOOL)animated

    - (void)viewDidUnload

  • Memory warning handling:

    - (void)didReceiveMemoryWarning

  • Deallocation

    - (void)viewDidUnload

    - (void)dealloc

UIViewController's lifecycle diagram

For more information please take a look on UIViewController Class Reference.

  • 1
    thanks for your diagram – AppHero2 Dec 15 '17 at 7:05

There's a lot of outdated and incomplete information here. For iOS 6 and newer only:

  1. loadView[a]
  2. viewDidLoad[a]
  3. viewWillAppear
  4. viewWillLayoutSubviews is the first time bounds are finalized
  5. viewDidLayoutSubviews
  6. viewDidAppear
  7. * viewWillLayoutSubviews[b]
  8. * viewDidLayoutSubviews[b]

Footnotes:

(a) - If you manually nil out your view during didReceiveMemoryWarning, loadView and viewDidLoad will be called again. That is, by default loadView and viewDidLoad only gets called once per view controller instance.

(b) May be called an additional 0 or more times.

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    viewWillLayoutSubviews and viewDidLayoutSubviews will also be called at other times when subviews of the main view are loaded, for example when cells of a table view or collection view are loaded. – ThomasW Apr 18 '16 at 4:56

Explaining State Transitions in the official doc: https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/uikit/reference/UIViewController_Class/index.html

This image shows the valid state transitions between various view ‘will’ and ‘did’ callback methods

Valid State Transitions

init(coder:)

When you create the views of your app in a Storyboard, init(coder:) is the method that gets called to instantiate your view controller and bring it to life. The contract for this method is actually defined in the NSCoding protocol, so you won’t see it in the UIViewController documentation.

When this method is called, your view will likely be displayed sometime in the near future (or the very immediate future), but at this point there’s no guarantee that it actually will be displayed. So this might be a good time to start getting things in order, but don’t too much here or you’ll be wasting processing power. In this method, you might instantiate dependencies, including subviews that you’ll add to your view programmatically. And note that init(coder:) is called only once during the life of the object, as all init methods are.

viewDidLoad()

Called after init(coder:) when the view is loaded into memory, this method is also called only once during the life of the view controller object. It’s a great place to do any view initialization or setup you didn’t do in the Storyboard. Perhaps you want to add subviews or auto layout constraints programmatically – if so, this is a great place to do either of those. Note that just because the view has been loaded into memory doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s going to be displayed soon – for that, you’ll want to look at viewWillAppear. Oh, and remember to call super.viewDidLoad() in your implementation to make sure your superclass’s viewDidLoad gets a chance to do its work – I usually call super right at the beginning of the implementation.

viewWillAppear(_:)

Always called after viewDidLoad (for obvious reasons, if you think about it), and just before the view appears on the screen to the user, viewWillAppear is called. This gives you a chance to do any last-minute view setup, kick off a network request (in another class, of course), or refresh the screen. Unlike viewDidLoad, viewWillAppear is called the first time the view is displayed as well as when the view is displayed again, so it can be called multiple times during the life of the view controller object. It’s called when the view is about to appear as a result of the user tapping the back button, closing a modal dialog, when the view controller’s tab is selected in a tab bar controller, or a variety of other reasons. Make sure to call super.viewWillAppear() at some point in the implementation—I generally do it first thing.

viewWillDisappear(_:)

Similar to viewWillAppear, this method is called just before the view disappears from the screen. And like viewWillAppear, this method can be called multiple times during the life of the view controller object. It’s called when the user navigates away from the screen—perhaps dismissing the screen, selecting another tab, tapping a button that shows a modal view, or navigating further down the navigation hierarchy. This is a great place to hide the keyboard, save state, and possibly cancel running timers or network requests. Like the other methods in the view controller lifecycle, be sure to call super at some point in viewWillDisappear.

As per Apple docs

viewDidLoad - Called when the view controller’s content view (the top of its view hierarchy) is created and loaded from a storyboard. Use this method to perform any additional setup required by your view controller.

viewWillAppear - Called just before the view controller’s content view is added to the app’s view hierarchy. Use this method to trigger any operations that need to occur before the content view is presented onscreen

viewDidAppear - Called just after the view controller’s content view has been added to the app’s view hierarchy. Use this method to trigger any operations that need to occur as soon as the view is presented onscreen, such as fetching data or showing an animation.

viewWillDisappear — Called just before the view controller’s content view is removed from the app’s view hierarchy. Use this method to perform cleanup tasks like committing changes or resigning the first responder status.

viewDidDisappear — Called just after the view controller’s content view has been removed from the app’s view hierarchy. Use this method to perform additional teardown activities.

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