35

I have a method that can throw two different exceptions, CommuncationException and SystemException. In both cases I do the same three-line code block.

try {
 ...
}

catch (CommunicationException ce) {
   ...
}

catch {SystemExcetion se) {
   ... 
}

Is there any possibility to do it like that?

try {
   ...
}

catch (CommunicationException ce, SystemException se) {
   ...
}

Then I would not have to write this much code. I know I could extract the exception handling to a private method, but since the code is only 3 lines long, the method definition would take more code than the body itself.

  • I'm not entirely sure you'd want to anyway. Wouldn't you still end up writing code to separate the exceptions - if (ce...) else (se...). In the end it might look more messy anyway. – James Wiseman Apr 6 '11 at 8:23
  • A similar question exists here stackoverflow.com/questions/136035/… but you'd be catching the base Exception and you'd still need to write code to check the derived type for CommunicationException or SystemException... it's more LOC than your existing catch {} catch {}, so not worth the hassle. – BoltClock Apr 6 '11 at 8:23
  • @James Wiseman No I wouldn't need an if/else since both exception handlings are exactly the same. – RoflcoptrException Apr 6 '11 at 8:24
23

In fact, you could catch only SystemException and it would handle CommunicationException too, because CommunicationException is derived from SystemException

catch (SystemException se) {
   ... //this handles both exceptions
}
  • 3
    +1: In his specific case, that would be the way to go. Good catch! – Daniel Hilgarth Apr 6 '11 at 8:27
  • 3
    Yes that would be possible, but is it also good practice? I would also catch all the other subclasses without explicitly knowing it? – RoflcoptrException Apr 6 '11 at 8:27
  • 1
    You do that anyway, because you already catch SystemException. – Daniel Hilgarth Apr 6 '11 at 8:28
  • 1
    Omg yes ;) I never thought of that. Then the first catch is quite useless. – RoflcoptrException Apr 6 '11 at 8:29
  • 10
    No, it would not be good practice, cause it'll catch MASS of exceptions. But as Daniel mentioned, you already do that if it's not CommunicationException :) – archil Apr 6 '11 at 8:30
134

If you can upgrade your application to C# 6 you are lucky. The new C# version has implemented Exception filters. So you can write this:

catch (Exception ex) when (ex is CommunicationException || ex is SystemException) {
    //handle it
}

Some people think this code is the same as

catch (Exception ex) {                
    if (ex is CommunicationException || ex is SystemException) {
        //handle it
    }
    throw;
}

But it´s not. Actually this is the only new feature in C# 6 that is not possible to emulate in prior versions. First, a re-throw means more overhead than skipping the catch. Second, it is not semantically equivalent. The new feature preserves the stack intact when you are debugging your code. Without this feature the crash dump is less useful or even useless.

See a discussion about this on CodePlex. And an example showing the difference.

  • 7
    As the up votes reflect, this is a better answer to the question. The accepted answer correctly addresses the code sample given but does not answer the question asked. – reads0520 Sep 21 '17 at 13:32
  • 5
    This should be the accepted answer – Regis St-Gelais Nov 8 '17 at 15:58
11

Unfortunately, there is no way. The syntax you used is invalid and a fall through like in a switch-statement isn't possible either. I think you need to go with the private method.

A little hacky work-around would be something like this:

var exceptionHandler = new Action<Exception>(e => { /* your three lines */ });
try
{
    // code that throws
}
catch(CommuncationException ex)
{
    exceptionHandler(ex);
}
catch(SystemException ex)
{
    exceptionHandler(ex);
}

You need to decide for yourself if this makes any sense.

  • He doesn't want to do that :p – Gerrie Schenck Apr 6 '11 at 8:35
  • Yeah, where did he specify that? ;-) He just doesn't want to create a private method because of the code overhead it creates. This overhead is greatly reduced in my sample. But anyway, my main answer is, that he just can't do what he wants to do... I don't provide him with a "solution" he already dismissed in his question. – Daniel Hilgarth Apr 6 '11 at 8:37
  • I know, just having a laugh :) – Gerrie Schenck Apr 6 '11 at 8:41
5

No, you can't do it that way. The only way i know of is to catch a generic Exception and then check what type it is:

try
{
   ...
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
   if(ex is CommunicationException || ex is SystemException)
   {
      ...
   }
   else
   {
     ... // throw; if you don't want to handle it
   }
}
  • 4
    This changes the call stack of the exception. Not really what you want to. – Daniel Hilgarth Apr 6 '11 at 8:26
  • Why does this change the call stack if I just use throw in the else statement? – RoflcoptrException Apr 6 '11 at 8:33
  • Have a look here: stackoverflow.com/questions/5152265/… – Daniel Hilgarth Apr 6 '11 at 8:35
  • Thanks a lot, I always thought I should just avoid using throw ex – RoflcoptrException Apr 6 '11 at 8:39
  • That's right, you should avoid using "throw ex;", but it's not what he is doing, he's keeping the original exception info by using "throw;" – Jorn.Beyers Nov 9 '18 at 8:24
3

What about

try {


...
}

catch (CommunicationException ce) {
   HandleMyError(ce);
}

catch {SystemExcetion se) {
   HandleMyError(se);
}

private void HandleMyError(Exception ex)
{
// handle your error
}
3

Possible Duplicate of

Catch multiple exceptions at once?

I quote the answer here:

 catch (Exception ex)            
       {                
           if (ex is FormatException ||
               ex is OverflowException)
           {
               WebId = Guid.Empty;
               return;
           }
           else
           {
               throw;
           }
       }
  • I don't agree with the solution provided in that question for the same reason I don't support alexn's answer. It is indeed the same answer as alexn already gave... – Daniel Hilgarth Apr 6 '11 at 8:32
  • @Daniel: Hmmm..nice to know that it changes the call stack and might not work properly. – Marshal Apr 6 '11 at 8:36
  • It is important in this solution that it re-throws all the rest-type exceptions! – florien Oct 28 '17 at 18:14
1

Since you're doing the same for both type of exceptions, you could just go:

try
{
    //do stuff
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    //normal exception handling here
}

Only catch explicit Exception types if you need to do something unique for it.

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