6

I am not expert with bash but I would imagine this would be a simple script. I am trying to read a file with a few lines into a single bash variable without the new lines.

My current script reads them in but keeps the presence of newlines

options=$(<vm.options)
echo "$options"

The file looks something like this:

-Random 1
-Letters2
-Occur 3
-In
-Passwords9

The script would read this into a variable where its output would look like:

-Random 1 -Letters2 -Occur 3 -In -Passwords9

4 Answers 4

4

You can simply replace the new line with tr :

options=$(cat lf | tr -s '\n' ' ')
2
  • 2
    Close but doesn't separate each line with a space for the desired output. Apr 11, 2019 at 15:16
  • 1
    Missed the space requirement. Answer updated to handle this Apr 11, 2019 at 15:23
2

You can do search/replace in bash after reading file content:

options=$(<vm.options)
# replace \n with space
options="${options//$'\n'/ }"

Now examine options variable:

declare -p options

declare -- options="-Random 1 -Letters2 -Occur 3 -In -Passwords9"
2
  • 1
    Thank you. This is the only solution that takes care of new lines and creates a space between each line. Apr 11, 2019 at 15:15
  • Did this solution not work for some case for you?
    – anubhava
    Mar 1, 2023 at 2:42
2

This also produces the desired output:

echo "\
-Random 1
-Letters2
-Occur 3
-In
-Passwords9" > tmp

var=$(cat tmp | tr -s '\n' ' ')

echo $var

resulting in:

-Random 1 -Letters2 -Occur 3 -In -Passwords9

the part with cat is not pretty (and may break in specific instances) but it works for this case.

1
  • 1
    This doesn't take in account \n, so everything remains on a newline with cat. Apr 11, 2019 at 15:14
-1

Avoid search and replace and line endings issues:

options=$(echo $(cat vm.options))

To prove you got the newlines removed:

echo "$options"

and see just one line.

1
  • echo appends a newline. Your proof would need to look like this: echo -n "$options"
    – schmijos
    yesterday

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