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I am looking for speeding up following python numpy codes:

def fun_np(m,data):
a, b, c = data[:,0], data[:,1], data[:,2] 

M = len(data[:,0]) 
n = round((m+1)*(m+2)*(m+3)/6) 
u =np.zeros((M,n))

C = 0
for i in range(0,m+1):
    for j in range(0,i+1):
        for k in range(0,j+1):
            if ((i-j)!=0):
                u[:,C] = (j-k)*(a)**(i-j)*(b)**(j-k-1)*(c)**k

        C=C+1  
return u

corresponding cython codes are as follows:

%%cython 
import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np
from cython import wraparound, boundscheck, nonecheck

@boundscheck(False)
@wraparound(False)
@nonecheck(False)

cpdef fun_cyt(int m,np.ndarray[np.float64_t, ndim=2] data):

cdef:
    np.ndarray[np.float64_t, ndim=1] a = data[:,0]
    np.ndarray[np.float64_t, ndim=1] b = data[:,1]
    np.ndarray[np.float64_t, ndim=1] c = data[:,2]
    int M, n
    Py_ssize_t i, j, k, s
M = len(data[:,0]) 
n = round((m+1)*(m+2)*(m+3)/6)   
cdef np.ndarray[np.float64_t, ndim=2]  u = np.zeros((M,n), dtype=np.float64)

cdef int C = 0
for i in range(m+1): #range(0,m+1):
    for j in range(i+1):
        for k in range(j+1):
            for s in range(M):
                if (i-j)!=0:
                    u[s,C] = (j-k)*(a[s])**(i-j)*(b[s])**(j-k-1)*(c[s])**k

            C=C+1
return u

Here are timings

z = np.random.randn(6000, 3); m=20;

%timeit fun_np(m,z);

result: 1.97 s ± 11.2 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

%timeit fun_cyt(m,z);

result: 1.91 s ± 12.7 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

As you can see there is not a significance speed between numpy and cython codes. I would appreciate if you can help to optimize the cython codes if possible.

Annotated html of cython codes html

  • If you're looking for a code review, please try your luck at codereview.stackexchange.com as your question is off topic on StackOverflow. – Hille Apr 11 '19 at 15:07
  • @HIlle No - there's no reason why it's off-topic here. I'd say it falls under the first bullet point listed in the help "a specific programming problem". The fact that it might also be on-topic at code review doesn't mean it's off-topic here. – DavidW Apr 11 '19 at 15:23
  • 1
    @ForBonder Have you looked at the annotated html output (from running cython -a yourfile.pyx)? It can often give you a clue if there's anything you've missed – DavidW Apr 11 '19 at 15:33
  • @DavidW Thank you, I looked at annotated html but no advance. I have added the link for the annotated html. – For Bonder Apr 11 '19 at 15:50
  • That looks pretty good. This is the sort of problem Cython is quite good at, and it looks like you've done the right things, so it's a bit surprising you don't see a difference. – DavidW Apr 11 '19 at 16:12
1

As already mentioned in the comments, you could try it with numba. I would recommend further to parallelize the loops:

from numba import prange, jit

@jit(nopython=True, parallel=True)
def fun_numba(m,data):
    a, b, c = data[:,0], data[:,1], data[:,2] 

    M = len(data[:,0]) 
    n = round((m+1)*(m+2)*(m+3)/6) 
    u = np.zeros((M,n))

    C = 0
    for i in range(0,m+1):
        for j in range(0,i+1):
            for k in prange(0,j+1):
                if ((i-j)!=0):
                    u[:,C] = (j-k)*(a)**(i-j)*(b)**(j-k-1)*(c)**k

            C=C+1  
    return u

gives me on my machine:

In [11]: %timeit fun_np(m,z)                                                                         
642 ms ± 4.13 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

In [12]: %timeit fun_numba(m,z)                                                                      
101 ms ± 7.15 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
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1

Very interesting example! Most of the operations are on the 6000 element-vectors. Cython cannot really be faster than numpy when it comes to large vector power, multiplication and addition. You may be as fast as numpy by implementing this in Cython, and maybe even gain 10% to 20% by removing some overhead of numpy.

However, there are other ways to speed this calculation up. The vector operations are operations on the three columns of your data vector, and you write into the columns of your output vector. By default, numpy arrays have Row-major ordering, that is in memory the rows are contiguous in memory. For the operations done here, this is bad. Further reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Row-_and_column-major_order.

The two functions are basically the same, they would be identical if the creation of the output vector would happen outside of the function.

Note the following: I replaced u[:,C] = ... with u[:,C] +=, because otherwise the result is only defined by k=j and thus always 0. I do not know what the point of these calculations is, but that is probably not it.

import numpy as np
def fun_np(m,data):
    a, b, c = data[:,0], data[:,1], data[:,2] 

    M = len(data[:,0]) 
    n = round((m+1)*(m+2)*(m+3)/6) 
    u = np.zeros((M,n))

    C = 0
    for i in range(0,m+1):
        for j in range(0,i+1):
            for k in range(0,j+1):
                if ((i-j)!=0):
                    u[:,C] += (j-k)*(a)**(i-j)*(b)**(j-k-1)*(c)**k

            C=C+1  
    return u

def fun_npF(m,data):
    a, b, c = data[:,0], data[:,1], data[:,2] 

    M = len(data[:,0]) 
    n = round((m+1)*(m+2)*(m+3)/6) 
    u = np.zeros((M,n),order='F')

    C = 0
    for i in range(0,m+1):
        for j in range(0,i+1):
            for k in range(0,j+1):
                if ((i-j)!=0):
                    u[:,C] += (j-k)*(a)**(i-j)*(b)**(j-k-1)*(c)**k

            C=C+1  
    return u

z = np.random.randn(6000, 3); m=20;
print("Numpy Row-major")
%timeit fun_np(m,z);

# Fortran order, because vector operations on columns
print("Numpy Column-major")
zF = np.asarray(z.copy(),order='F')
%timeit fun_npT(m,zF);

# Check if output the same
diff = (max(np.ravel(abs(fun_np(m,z)-fun_npF(m,zF)))))
max_rm = (max(np.ravel(abs(fun_np(m,z)))))
max_cm = (max(np.ravel(abs(fun_npF(m,zF)))))
print("Dffference: %f, Max value Row-major: %f, Max value Column-major: %f"%(diff, max_rm, max_cm))

This gives me

Numpy Row-major
1.64 s ± 12.3 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)
Numpy Column-major
16 ms ± 345 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)
Dffference: 0.000000, Max value Row-major: 196526643123.792450, Max value Column-major: 196526643123.792450

You can gain even more when thinking about where to put the "if" and combining this with Cython, but again only by some 10% to 20% I would guess.

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