3

I'm an Android developer switching from Java to Kotlin, and I am planning to use the coroutines to handle asynchronous code since it looks very promising.

Back in Java, to handle asynchronous code I was using the Executor class to execute a time-consuming piece of code in another thread, away from the UI thread. I had an AppExecutors class that I injected in my xxxRepository classes to manage a set of Executor. It looked like this :

public class AppExecutors
{
    private static class DiskIOThreadExecutor implements Executor
    {
        private final Executor mDiskIO;

        public DiskIOThreadExecutor()
        {
            mDiskIO = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
        }

        @Override
        public void execute(@NonNull Runnable command)
        {
            mDiskIO.execute(command);
        }
    }

    private static class MainThreadExecutor implements Executor
    {
        private Handler mainThreadHandler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());

        @Override
        public void execute(@NonNull Runnable command)
        {
            mainThreadHandler.post(command);
        }
    }

    private static volatile AppExecutors INSTANCE;

    private final DiskIOThreadExecutor diskIo;
    private final MainThreadExecutor mainThread;

    private AppExecutors()
    {
        diskIo = new DiskIOThreadExecutor();
        mainThread = new MainThreadExecutor();
    }

    public static AppExecutors getInstance()
    {
        if(INSTANCE == null)
        {
            synchronized(AppExecutors.class)
            {
                if(INSTANCE == null)
                {
                    INSTANCE = new AppExecutors();
                }
            }
        }
        return INSTANCE;
    }

    public Executor diskIo()
    {
        return diskIo;
    }

    public Executor mainThread()
    {
        return mainThread;
    }
}

Then I was able to write some code like this in my xxxRepository :

executors.diskIo().execute(() ->
        {
            try
            {
                LicensedUserOutput license = gson.fromJson(Prefs.getString(Constants.SHAREDPREF_LICENSEINFOS, ""), LicensedUserOutput.class);

                /**
                 * gson.fromJson("") returns null instead of throwing an exception as reported here :
                 * https://github.com/google/gson/issues/457
                 */
                if(license != null)
                {
                    executors.mainThread().execute(() -> callback.onUserLicenseLoaded(license));
                }
                else
                {
                    executors.mainThread().execute(() -> callback.onError());
                }
            }
            catch(JsonSyntaxException e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();

                executors.mainThread().execute(() -> callback.onError());
            }
        });

It worked very good and Google even has something similar in their many Github Android repo examples.

So I was using callbacks. But now I am tired of the nested callbacks and I want to get rid of them. To do so, I could write in my xxxViewModel for example :

executors.diskIo().execute(() -> 
        {
            int result1 = repo.fetch();
            String result2 = repo2.fetch(result1);

            executors.mainThread().execute(() -> myLiveData.setValue(result2));
        });

How is that USAGE different from Kotlin's coroutines' usage ? From what I saw, their biggest advantage is to be able to use asynchronous code in a sequential code style. But I am able to do just that with Executor, as you can see from the code sample right above. So what am I missing here ? What would I gain to switch from Executor to Coroutines ?

2

Okay, so coroutines are more often compared to threads rather than the tasks that you run on a given thread pool. An Executor is slightly different in that you have something that is managing threads and queueing tasks up to be executed on those threads.

I will also confess that I have only been using Kotlin's courotines and actors solidly for about 6 months, but let us continue.

Async IO

So, I think that one big difference is that running your task in a coroutine will allow you to achieve concurrency on a single thread for an IO task if that task is a truly async IO task that properly yields control while the IO task is still completing. You can achieve very light weight concurrent reads/writes with coroutines in this way. You could launch 10 000 coroutines all reading from disk at the same time on 1 thread and it would happen concurrently. You can read more on async IO here async io wiki

For an Executor service on the other hand, if you had 1 thread in your pool, your multiple IO tasks would execute and block in series on that thread. Even if you were using an async library.

Structured Concurrency

With coroutines and coroutine scope, you get something called structured concurrency. This means that you have to do far less book keeping about the various background tasks you are running so that you can properly do clean up of those tasks if you enter into some error path. With your executor, you would need to keep track of your futures and do the cleanup yourself. Here is a really good article written by one of the kotlin team leads to fully explain this subtlety. Structured Concurrency

Interaction with Actors

Another, probably more niche advantage is that with coroutines, producers and consumers, you can interact with Actors. Actors encapsulate state, and achieve thread safe concurrency through communication rather than through the traditional synchronized tools. Using all of these you can achieve a very light weight and highly concurrent state with very little thread overhead. Executors just do not offer the ability to interact with synchronized state in something like an Actor with say for example 10 000 threads or even 1000 threads. You could happily launch 100 000 coroutines, and if the tasks are suspending and yield control at suitable points, you can achieve some excellent things. You can read more here Shared Mutable state

Light Weight

And finally, just to demonstrate how light weight coroutine concurrency is, I would challenge you to do something like this on an executor and see what the total elapsed time is (this completed in 1160 milliseconds on my machine):

fun main() = runBlocking {
    val start = System.currentTimeMillis()
    val jobs = List(10_000){
        launch {
            delay(1000) // delays for 1000 millis
            print(".")
        }
    }
    jobs.forEach { it.join() }
    val end = System.currentTimeMillis()
    println()
    println(end-start)
}

There are probably other things, but as I said, I am still learning.

  • 4-5 threads in Android apps are far more than enough. So Coroutines begin lightweight is not cutting edge for us Android developers. That only leaves me with your Structured Concurrency argument, which I will kindly look into but doesn't seem to be the big revolution that I read about when I type "kotlin coroutine" on Google. Is that really it with coroutines compared to Executor ? I thought I was missing some revolutionary point. – Charly Lafon Apr 12 at 8:37
  • I think you are missing the "revolutionary" point. 4-5 threads is probably all you need for pretty much most things, and 10 000 coroutines would still be running on these 4-5 threads in the background. But, if you want to do 1000 things concurrently, if you have a thread pool of 4-5, and you are doing this in with an executor, then you will only ever be doing 4-5 of them at a time. If each of them take 1 second, you will complete that stack of 1000 tasks 10's of seconds later rather than in sub 2 seconds. Iif you are not going to be leveraging the advantages then stick with your executor. – Laurence Apr 12 at 9:07
  • @CharlyLafon not trying to be a pain, but look at the title of your question. Does this answer it? – Laurence Apr 12 at 9:14
  • Haha I will reformulate, in Android we only need to do 4-5 simultaneous jobs in background. We will never launch 10 000 concurrent coroutines. Not even 10. So I'm sincerely sorry but no, it doesn't answer my question since this argument is not applicable to Android development. But I recognize I should have added "Android" to the title though. Sorry. UPDATE : I added it. – Charly Lafon Apr 12 at 9:19
  • 1
    @CharlyLafon I am afraid this is just not correct. Android development does no mean less than 10 concurrent tasks. What if I write an android game engine which treats every single entity in the game as an Actor being updated with its own coroutine and communicating via channels? You are making this question a very subjective and single use case question, which is not really suitable IMO – Laurence Apr 12 at 9:36
-4

Alright I found the answer by myself while using the Coroutines in my apps. For reminder, I was looking for a difference in usage. I was able to sequentially execute asynchronous code with Executor and I saw everywhere that it was the biggest advantage of Coroutines, so what's the big benefit from switching to Coroutines ?

First, you can see from my last sample that it is the xxxViewModel that chooses what thread the asynchronous tasks were running on. This is in my opinion a design flaw. The ViewModel should not know that and even less have the responsability of choosing the thread.

Now with coroutines, I can write something like this :

// ViewModel
viewModelScope.launch {
    repository.insert(Title(title = "Hola", id = 1))
    myLiveData.value = "coroutines are great"
}
// Repository
suspend fun insert(title: Title)
{
    withContext(Dispatchers.IO)
    {
        dao.insertTitle(title)
    }
}

We can see that it is the suspend function that chooses what Dispatcher is managing a task, and not the ViewModel. I find this much nicer as it encapsulates this logic into the Repository.

Also, Coroutines cancelation is much easier than ExecutorService cancelation. ExecutorService is not really made for cancelation. It has a shutdown() method but it will cancel all the tasks of an ExecutorService, not just the one we need to cancel. If the scope of our ExecutorService is bigger than our viewmodel's, we're screwed. With Coroutines, it is so easy that you don't even have to care about it. If you use viewModelScope (you should), it will cancel all Coroutines within this scope in the viewmodel's onCleared() method, by itself.

In conclusion, Coroutines have much more integration with Android's components than ExecutorService, better and cleaner managing features, and yes they are lightweight. Even if I don't think it is a killer argument on Android, it's still good to have more lightweight components.

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