67

Why there is no pop_front method in C++ std::vector?

8 Answers 8

90

Because a std::vector has no particular feature regarding inserting elements at the front, unlike some other containers. The functionality provided by each container makes sense for that container.

You probably should be using a std::deque, which is explicitly good at inserting at the front and back.

Check this diagram out.

4
  • 2
    Nice diagram there but that's all black hard to comprehend Nov 23, 2020 at 2:57
  • 2
    This doesn't really explain why there is no pop_front() method, it only talks about insertion. How does inserting elements relate to popping elements? Dec 17, 2020 at 11:41
  • would be nice if there is way to fix the diagram.
    – cpchung
    Jan 2, 2021 at 21:19
  • Note that you say "inserting", the OP asked about "pop_front()" which, if I'm correct, is deleting/removing (erasing). Not inserting. Jun 25 at 4:03
41

Although inefficient on large vectors, the following is equivalent to a pop_front() for a std::vector

vec.erase(vec.begin());

As stated in other answers, std::vector is not designed to remove the first element and will require to move/copy all remaining elements. Depending on the specific use case, it might be convenient to consider other containers.

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    This works but it's not going to be efficient on large vectors. Jun 23, 2019 at 6:21
  • what will be the time complexity of this btw? Aug 7, 2021 at 13:53
  • 1
    @SwastikSingh O(n) Aug 22, 2021 at 20:38
21

vector is typically implemented something like this:

struct 
{
  T* begin; // points to the first T in the vector
  T* end; // points just after the last T in the vector
  int capacity; // how many Ts of memory were allocated
};

"begin" serves double-duty as "pointer to the first T in the vector" and "pointer to all the memory we allocated." therefore it's impossible to "pop" elements off the front of the vector by simply incrementing "begin" - do this and you no longer have a pointer to the memory you need to deallocate. that would leak memory. so a "pop_front" would need to copy all the Ts from the back of the vector to the front of the vector, and that is comparatively slow. so they decided to leave it out of the standard.

what you want is something like this:

struct 
{
  T* allocated; // points to all the memory we allocated
  T* begin; // points to the first T in the vector
  T* end; // points just after the last T in the vector
  int capacity; // how many Ts of memory were allocated
};

with this, you can "pop_front" by moving "begin" forward and backward with no danger of forgetting which memory to deallocate later. why doesn't std::vector work this way? i guess it was a matter of taste among those who wrote the standard. their goal was probably to provide the simplest possible "dynamically resizeable array" they could, and i think they succeeded.

1
  • Not just 'taste'. Imagine all the arbitrary decisions: pushing at front exhausts the free space at head. Reallocate or just move items till there's free space at the end, if there's any at all? Pushing at end, likewise, do we move towards front or reallocate? Just moving seems wasteful, but realloc costs. Make it cyclic and enter index calculation hell? Then the capacity. Reserve(100), where do we put first element? front? center? Why? Let's pop some items, it's empty now, begin met the end, do we adjust them towards front,center,end or do nothing? Too much for configuring via type traits/etc. Aug 14, 2020 at 11:39
16

Because push_back and pop_back are special operations for a vector that require only O(1) computation. Any other push or pop takes O(n).

This is not a "bug" or a "quirk", this is just a property of the vector container. If you need a fast pop_front consider changing to an other container.

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    Specifically, consider changing to std::deque<> if you need fast pop_front().
    – ildjarn
    Apr 6, 2011 at 9:15
  • "requires only O(1) computation" - amortized O(1) in the case of push_back, worst case is Theta(n) when it has to reallocate because you haven't reserved the space. Apr 6, 2011 at 9:15
  • I left out allocation in this example because the user was talking about popping. You are right though.
    – orlp
    Apr 6, 2011 at 9:17
  • Naturally it would have to do a re-allocation, but why would that be O(n) in comparison to a re-allocation of 'push_back' Apr 6, 2011 at 9:26
  • 2
    Why couldn't pop_front be O(1)? You'd just advance the pointer to the start of the array by one element?
    – Jonathan.
    Sep 1, 2016 at 11:49
4

However, if you need a pop_front and do NOT care about the index of the elements in the vector, you can do kind of a pop_front with something like

template<typename T>
void pop_front(std::vector<T>& vec)
{
   vec.front() = vec.back();
   vec.pop_back();
}

Dan Higgins talks about this too: https://youtu.be/oBbGC-sUYVA?t=2m52s

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    It would be a weird case where you both did and did not care about the order of elements. Because if you really didn't care, this is even easier: template<typename T> void pop_front(std::vector<T>& v) { v.pop_back(); }
    – MSalters
    Apr 6, 2011 at 12:16
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    Your comment seems wrong to me. By doing template<typename T> void pop_front(std::vector<T>& v) { v.pop_back(); } you would not remove the expected front element. My suggestion is to "swap" front and back elements and remove the last one. Nov 2, 2014 at 10:40
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    Also, using a vector when not deeply caring about elements order may happen if you want to manipulate a continuous buffer of memory. I'm not arguing wether this is a good idea or not but in this very specific (and specified) case, it is a valid way of doing a pop_front in O(1). Nov 2, 2014 at 10:45
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    pretty clever, but mostly useless :) +1 from me Jul 13, 2017 at 2:08
  • @marchelbling I think this is an O(2) since you have a copy + an erase. I think it is a clever way of doing it if you use a vector just to hold N items and not to hold N items in a specific order. Jun 23, 2019 at 5:23
2

Probably because it would be monumentally slow for large vectors.

pop_front() on a vector containing 1000 objects would require 999 operator=() calls.

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    Not any slower then erase(v.begin()). It's because vectors have no special properties for pushing in the beginning, opposed to pushing at the end (or popping).
    – orlp
    Apr 6, 2011 at 9:13
  • 1
    @nightcracker - True, erase() is equally bad. And I agree that wanting pop_front() on a vector is a good 'smell' that you're using the wrong type of container!
    – Roddy
    Apr 6, 2011 at 9:17
1

Vector seems like a stack container, we have a stack to store data. So we just pop_back not to pop_front. If you want to pop_front, std::list may be a better choice for you. Cause it is a bi-direction like queue structure.

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#define push_front(v,val) v.insert(v.begin(), 1, val);
#define pop_front(v)  if(!v.empty())v.erase(v.begin());

You can directly write this and use this

push_front(vec,val);
pop_front(vec);
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  • The question was not "how do I do that?" but "why is there no such function?" ... Jun 25 at 3:59

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