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I have a form created in html, with two input fields and one button. When clicking on the button i want a function to be called for that will then add the two numbers and then display the sum via the alert function.

I know how to call for the function when the button is clicked, and i know how to read and store the two inputs in separate variables.

I would like some tips on how to in the easiest way validate the input as numbers only?

function Calculate() {
  var num1 = document.getElementById("num1").value;

  var num2 = document.getElementById("num2").value;
  num1_parsed = parseInt(num1);    

  num2_parsed = parseInt(num2);

  if (num1_parsed) {    

  } else {
    alert("Wrong input!!!");
    return false;    
  }

  var total = num1_parsed + num2_parsed;
  alert("The total sum of your numbers are: " + sum);
}

This code works for some reason, tho if num1 is correct but num2 is not it gives message NaN instead of the alert message!

1

JavaScript Method

With JavaScript doing the validation, you can use the isNaN() function. This will return true if the input is not a number.

function Calculate() 
{
  var num1 = document.getElementById("num1").value;
  var num2 = document.getElementById("num2").value;

  num1_parsed = parseFloat(num1);    
  num2_parsed = parseFloat(num2);

  if(isNaN(num1_parsed) || isNaN(num2_parsed))
  {
      alert("Wrong input!!!");
      return false;
  } else {
      var total= num1_parsed + num2_parsed;
      alert("The total sum of your numbers are: " + total);
      return true;
  }
}

HTML5 Method

Additionally, if you wish to use HTML5 only to ensure the input values are number's then you can use the type="number" attribute to the input tag. This adds built-in validation to reject non-numerical numbers.

<input type="number" id="num1" />
<input type="number" id="num2" />
  • I suspect that properly implementing javascript validation is the actual lesson goal here. – The Head Rush Apr 11 at 20:19
  • Still have to cast values to number. A type="number" still returns string value – charlietfl Apr 11 at 20:23
  • Whoops...Thanks for the reminder. – Daniel McIntyre Apr 11 at 20:30
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If you can use an input element as type="number"

num1_parsed = Number(num1);
num2_parsed = Number(num2);

if (isNaN(num1_parsed) || isNaN(num2_parsed) ) {
    alert("Wrong input!!!");
    return false;
} else {
    // do stuff
    return true;        
}
  • You have the logic in reverse isNaN returns true if the value is not a number – Zohir Salak Apr 11 at 20:12
  • @ZohirSalak oops! – Ele Apr 11 at 20:12
0

Using isNaN() function. It might be more readable to use || instead of && which would mean that the result would be false.

function Calculate() {

  var num1 = document.getElementById("num1").value;
  var num2 = document.getElementById("num2").value;
  
  num1_parsed = parseInt(num1);    
  num2_parsed = parseInt(num2);
  
  
 //console.log((!(isNaN(num1_parsed))).toString() + " " + num1_parsed);
 //console.log((!(isNaN(num2_parsed))).toString() +  " " + num2_parsed);

  if (!(isNaN(num1_parsed)) && !(isNaN(num2_parsed))){
  var total = num1_parsed + num2_parsed;
  alert("The total sum of your numbers are: " + total);
  
  } else {
alert("Wrong input!!!");
    return false;        
  }


}
<input id="num1" />
<input id="num2" />
<button onclick="Calculate()">Calculate</button>

0

HTML

<input type="number" id="num1" />
<input type="number" id="num2" />
<button onClick="Calculate()" type="button">Get Sum</button>

JS

function Calculate() {
  var num1 = document.getElementById("num1").value;

  var num2 = document.getElementById("num2").value;
  num1_parsed = parseFloat(num1);    

  num2_parsed = parseFloat(num2);

  if (isNaN(num1_parsed) || isNaN(num2_parsed) ) {    
     alert("Wrong input!!!");
     return false;    
  }

  var total = num1_parsed + num2_parsed;
  alert("The total sum of your numbers are: " + total);
}

OR

function Calculate() {
  var num1 = document.getElementById("num1").value;

  var num2 = document.getElementById("num2").value;
  if( !num1 || !num2 ){
     alert("please enter values for num1 and num2");
  } 
  var total = eval(`${num1}+${num2}`);
  if( isNaN(total) ){
     alert("Wrong input!!!");
     return false;    
  }
  alert("The total sum of your numbers are: " + total);
}
  • Yes, what if num1 or num2 is empty ? also – Zohir Salak Apr 11 at 20:38
  • if any num is empty parseFloat will return "NaN" object – Vinesh Goyal Apr 11 at 20:42
  • if one of the values is empty the eval returns the other one – Zohir Salak Apr 11 at 20:45
  • for that you can add check for that before eval – Vinesh Goyal Apr 11 at 20:47
  • I have updated the code – Vinesh Goyal Apr 11 at 20:54
0

Solution:

You can use map combined with Number to perform the initial transform. Afterwards using reduce can give you the total. Then you simply check if any of the numbers equal NaN.


Code:

  let num = (n) => document.getElementById("num" + n).value,
    total = (numbers = [num(1), num(2)].map(Number)).reduce((a, v) => a + v);

  if (numbers.some(Number.isNaN)) alert("wrong");
  else alert("The total sum of your numbers are: " + total);

Note: It's important to realize that isNaN and Number.isNaN are different and will sometimes give different results. Number.isNaN specifically looks to see if a value is a number and if that number type is NaN. isNaN will coerce the supplied value. A.e. isNaN(undefined) and Number.isNaN(undefined) return true and false respectively.


Demo:

function Calculate() {
  let num = (n) => document.getElementById("num" + n).value,
    total = (numbers = [num(1), num(2)].map(Number)).reduce((a, v) => a + v);

  if (numbers.some(Number.isNaN)) alert("wrong");
  else alert("The total sum of your numbers are: " + total);


}

document.querySelector("button").addEventListener("click", Calculate);
<input id="num1" value="34" />
<input id="num2" value="100" />
<hr/>
<button>Calculate</button>

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