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I'm looking for a way to write the following javascript code in applescript: If the condition is false then I want to do something.

var regEx = /\d{5}/g;
var str = 'This string contains 12345';

if (!regEx.test(str)){
    do something
}

Below is the applescript I started but it doesn't work.

set str to 'This string contains 12345'
set regEx to <NOT SURE HOW APPLESCRIPT HANDLES THIS>

if string does contains "12345" then
 do something
end if 

In Javascript ! = does not. What is the equivalent in applescript? and how do I handle RegEx?

My overall goal is to find out if the finder window selected DOES NOT contain any 5 digit number combination in the folder name.

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    Vanilla AppleScript can't handle regex. You could use the SatImage OSAX or NSRegularExpression from the Foundation framework – vadian Apr 11 '19 at 21:50
  • Thanks for that @vadian, but that is a bit much for me. Forget REGEX, how would you search a string that contains 5 digits? – NoobUser Apr 11 '19 at 21:56
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    You could also shell out to something that does know regex, for example set bool to (do shell script "/usr/bin/ruby -e 'puts !(\"" & str & "\" =~ /\\d{5}/).nil?'") = "true" – red_menace Apr 11 '19 at 22:16
  • Thanks @red_menace. After testing and fiddling around your suggestion acts like regex. – NoobUser Apr 11 '19 at 22:34
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tl;dr For any version of macOS that is >= OSX 10.8 you'll need to replace grep's -P option (as indicated in the "Solution" section below) with the -E option - as mentioned in the "Different grep utilities" section at the bottom of this post.


As correctly noted in the comments...

Vanilla AppleScript can't handle regex. - vadian

so you'll need to

shell out to something that does know regex - red_menace


Solution:

To meet your requirement with vanilla AppleScript in a way which is analogous to JavaScript's test() method, consider utilizing a custom AppleScript subroutine as follows:

Subroutine:

on regExpTest(str, re)      
  set statusCode to do shell script "grep -q -P " & quoted form of re & ¬
    " <<<" & quoted form of str & " 2>/dev/null; echo $?"

  if statusCode is equal to "0" then
    return true
  else
    return false
  end if
end regExpTest

Usage:

set regExp to "\\d{5}"
set str to "This string contains 12345"

if regExpTest(str, regExp) then
  display dialog "It DOES match so let's do something"
end if

Running the above script will display a dialog with the given message because there is a match between the regular expression and the specified string.

Note: AppleScript strings use the backslash as an escape character, so you'll notice that the \d metacharacter has been further escaped with an additional backslash, i.e. \\d

Inequality operators:

In Javascript != does not. What is the equivalent in applescript? and how do I handle RegEx?

AppleScript's inequality operators that are analogous to JavaScripts inequality operator (!=) are:

≠
is not
isn't
isn't equal [to]
is not equal [to]
doesn't equal
does not equal

So given your JavaScript if statement:

if (!regEx.test(str)){
  // do something
}

We can achieve the same logic, (again using the aforementioned custom regExpTest subroutine), with the following code:

set regExp to "\\d{5}"
set str to "This string contains 1234"

if regExpTest(str, regExp) ≠ true then
  display dialog "It DOES NOT match so let's do something"
end if

Note The str value only includes four consecutive digits, i.e. 1234.

This time running the above script will display a dialog with the given message because there is NOT a match between the regular expression and the specified string.

There are many variations that can be made to the aforementioned AppleScript if statement to acheieve the same desired logic. For example;

if regExpTest(str, regExp) is not equal to true then
  ...
end if
if regExpTest(str, regExp) = false then
  ...
end if

etc...


regExpTest subroutine explanation:

The aforementioned regExpTest AppleScript subroutine is essentially utilizing the do shell script command to run the following code that you would run directly via your macOS Terminal application. For instance in your Terminal application run the following two commands:

grep -q -P "\d{5}" <<<"This string contains 12345" 2>/dev/null; echo $?

Prints:

0

grep -q -P "\d{5}" <<<"This string contains 1234" 2>/dev/null; echo $?

Prints:

1


EDIT: Different grep utilities:

As noted in the comment by user3439894 it seems that some versions of the grep utility installed on Mac do not support the -P option which ensured the RegExp pattern was interpreted as a Perl regular expression. The reason why I opted to utilize a Perl Regular Expression is because they're more closely aligned to the regexp's used in JavaScript.

However, If you run man grep via your command line and discover that your greputility doesn't provide the -P option then change the following line of code in the regExpTest subroutine:

set statusCode to do shell script "grep -q -P " & quoted form of re & ¬
  " <<<" & quoted form of str & " 2>/dev/null; echo $?"

to this instead:

set statusCode to do shell script "grep -q -E " & quoted form of re & ¬
  " <<<" & quoted form of str & " 2>/dev/null; echo $?"

Note: The -P option has been changed to -E so the pattern is now interpreted as an extended regular expression (ERE) instead.

The shorthand metacharacter \d

You may also find that you need to change the the assignment of the regexp pattern from:

set regExp to "\\d{5}"

to

set regExp to "[0-9]{5}"

This time the shorthand metacharacter \d, (which is used match a digit), has been replaced with the equivalent character class [0-9].

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    In a stock macOS, your grep command using the -P option fails as that option is not supported. Use the -E option with stock macOS grep command. In e.g. macOS High Sierra the grep --version command returns grep (BSD grep) 2.5.1-FreeBSD. To use the -P option, GNU grep is needed. – user3439894 Apr 12 '19 at 12:54
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    Thank you @RobC for the explanation as it was very thorough :-). Even though I got the do shell script suggested by red_menace, I will be testing/studying what you shared. To user3439894, thank you for your added comment. – NoobUser Apr 12 '19 at 13:37
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    @user3439894 - Thanks for feedback regarding compatibility - added note to answer. Out of interest did your grep (BSD grep) 2.5.1-FreeBSD utility successfully handle the shorthand metacharacter \d in a ERE (i.e. with the -E option) - Or did you have to provide it as a character class instead, i.e. [0-9] ? – RobC Apr 12 '19 at 13:52
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    @RobC, Using the command example you've provided, while using the -E option instead of -P did work as tested, and why I suggested using it. BSD grep is the default grep for macOS, while one has to manually install GNU grep to use the -P option. BTW Nice answer! +1 – user3439894 Apr 12 '19 at 13:57
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    @RobC, Okay, Mac OS X 10.7 Lion was the last version to ship with GNU grep as the default and it has been BSD grep since OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion. – user3439894 Apr 12 '19 at 20:58
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As others have said, you can use the Foundation framework’s NSRegularExpression via the AppleScript-ObjC bridge.

That said, Objective-C APIs, while powerful, aren’t exactly AppleScripter-friendly, so I knocked together some “standard libraries” a few years back that wrapped a lot of that general functionality as nice native AppleScript commands.

e.g. Here’s the nearest equivalent to your JavaScript using the Text library’s search text command:

use script "Text"

set str to "This string contains 12345"

set foundMatches to search text str for "\\d{5}" using pattern matching

if foundMatches is not {} then
    -- do something
end if

Couldn’t drum up much interest so I no longer do development or support. But they’re free and open (public domain as far as I’m concerned) and still work fine in the current version of macOS AFAIK, so help yourself.

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