21

How to send http request on button click with react hooks? Or, for that matter, how to do any side effect on button click?

What i see so far is to have something "indirect" like:

export default = () => {
  const [sendRequest, setSendRequest] = useState(false);

  useEffect(() => {
    if(sendRequest){
       //send the request
       setSendRequest(false);
    }
  },
  [sendRequest]);

  return (
    <input type="button" disabled={sendRequest} onClick={() => setSendRequest(true)}
  );
}

Is that the proper way or is there some other pattern?

  • I think that there is no point in using react hooks to do that, you can just have a normal function withing your component and have it as your input event handler. – El Aoutar Hamza Apr 12 '19 at 8:24
  • how about the point that render (thus sfc) shouldn't have side effects? – dee zg Apr 12 '19 at 8:26
  • Using a hook would make the code far more flexible, but its a temporary measure as soon React will handle this using Suspense, see robinwieruch.de/react-hooks-fetch-data for more information. – dorriz Apr 12 '19 at 8:42
  • @dorriz yes yes, over time, suspense will be added to this story. but until then, lets pretend suspend doesn't/won't exist. – dee zg Apr 12 '19 at 8:46
18
export default () => {
  const [isSending, setIsSending] = useState(false)
  const sendRequest = useCallback(async () => {
    // don't send again while we are sending
    if (isSending) return
    // update state
    setIsSending(true)
    // send the actual request
    await API.sendRequest()
    // once the request is sent, update state again
    setIsSending(false)
  }, [isSending]) // update the callback if the state changes

  return (
    <input type="button" disabled={isSending} onClick={sendRequest} />
  )
}

this is what it would boil down to when you want to send a request on click and disabling the button while it is sending

update:

@tkd_aj pointed out that this might give a warning: "Can't perform a React state update on an unmounted component. This is a no-op, but it indicates a memory leak in your application. To fix, cancel all subscriptions and asynchronous tasks in a useEffect cleanup function."

Effectively, what happens is that the request is still processing, while in the meantime your component unmounts. It then tries to setIsSending (a setState) on an unmounted component.

export default () => {
  const [isSending, setIsSending] = useState(false)
  const isMounted = useRef(true)

  // set isMounted to false when we unmount the component
  useEffect(() => {
    return () => {
      isMounted.current = false
    }
  }, [])

  const sendRequest = useCallback(async () => {
    // don't send again while we are sending
    if (isSending) return
    // update state
    setIsSending(true)
    // send the actual request
    await API.sendRequest()
    // once the request is sent, update state again
    if (isMounted.current) // only update if we are still mounted
      setIsSending(false)
  }, [isSending]) // update the callback if the state changes

  return (
    <input type="button" disabled={isSending} onClick={sendRequest} />
  )
}
  • so, 1. setting the flag in state which then gets picked up by some other hook (be it useEffect or useCallback) is the proper way? 2. could you please include a sentence of explanation why would you prefer using useCallback instead of useCallback? tnx! – dee zg Apr 12 '19 at 8:38
  • 1
    useCallback instead of useEffect you mean? Well, because it's a callback and not a side-effect – DoXicK Apr 12 '19 at 9:03
  • well, depends on how you treat it. if you use reactive/declarative way, it can be sideEffect. if you use imperative way, it can be a callback. both work. but i see your point, of course. – dee zg Apr 12 '19 at 9:09
  • await API.sendRequest() is an effect, so I guess this code would behave in unpredictable ways. I'd consider using useEffect. – mayid Aug 18 '19 at 15:37
  • 1
    @tkd_aj this means that the actual request is resolved after the component is dismounted. I'll update my code to give an example on how to solve that :-) – DoXicK Sep 19 '19 at 14:26
8

You don't need an effect to send a request on button click, instead what you need is just a handler method which you can optimise using useCallback method

const App = (props) => {
   //define you app state here
   const fetchRequest = useCallback(() => {
       // Api request here
   }, [add dependent variables here]);

  return (
    <input type="button" disabled={sendRequest} onClick={fetchRequest}
  );
}

Tracking request using variable with useEffect is not a correct pattern because you may set state to call api using useEffect, but an additional render due to some other change will cause the request to go in a loop

  • @deezg glad to have helped :-) – Shubham Khatri Apr 15 '19 at 19:09
2

You can define the boolean in the state as you did and once you trigger the request set it to true and when you receive the response set it back to false:

const [requestSent, setRequestSent] = useState(false);

const sendRequest = () => {
  setRequestSent(true);
  fetch().then(() => setRequestSent(false));
};

Working example

  • i might very well be wrong, but isn't sfc meant to be side-effects free? i know this works, but it introduces side-effects without actual use of effects-like hooks. is that recommended approach? – dee zg Apr 12 '19 at 8:45
1

You can fetch data as an effect of some state changing like you have done in your question, but you can also get the data directly in the click handler like you are used to in a class component.

Example

const { useState } = React;

function getData() {
  return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(() => resolve(Math.random()), 1000))
}

function App() {
  const [data, setData] = useState(0)

  function onClick() {
    getData().then(setData)
  }

  return (
    <div>
      <button onClick={onClick}>Get data</button>
      <div>{data}</div>
    </div>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById("root"));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.development.js" crossorigin></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.development.js" crossorigin></script>

<div id="root"></div>

  • Apparently the OP is trying to disable the button which triggers the request, so probably you'll have to add setData(0) in your onClick – Teneff Apr 12 '19 at 8:41
  • what is the preferred way and why? also, what would you say about render/sfc shouldn't cause side-effects? here, our rendered content depends on the state of the request (sent, pending, response) – dee zg Apr 12 '19 at 8:42
  • 1
    @deezg It's very context specific and mostly a matter of opinion. If your effect has a lot of dependencies, it might be better to use an effect, but if there is just one piece of state like in my example it's easy to have the logic directly in the click handler. – Tholle Apr 12 '19 at 8:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.