87

I am trying to use a default AlertViewController with style .actionSheet. For some reason, the alert causes a constraint error. As long as the alertController is not triggered (displayed) through a button, there are no constraint errors on the whole view. Could it be that this is a bug of Xcode?

The exact error I get looks like this:

2019-04-12 15:33:29.584076+0200 Appname[4688:39368] [LayoutConstraints] Unable to simultaneously satisfy constraints.
    Probably at least one of the constraints in the following list is one you don't want. 
    Try this: 
        (1) look at each constraint and try to figure out which you don't expect; 
        (2) find the code that added the unwanted constraint or constraints and fix it. 
(
    "<NSLayoutConstraint:0x6000025a1e50 UIView:0x7f88fcf6ce60.width == - 16   (active)>"
)

Will attempt to recover by breaking constraint 
<NSLayoutConstraint:0x6000025a1e50 UIView:0x7f88fcf6ce60.width == - 16   (active)>

This is the code I use:

@objc func changeProfileImageTapped(){
        print("ChangeProfileImageButton tapped!")
        let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Change your profile image", message: nil, preferredStyle: .actionSheet)

        alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Photo Library", style: .default, handler: nil))
        alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Online Stock Library", style: .default, handler: nil))
        alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: .cancel, handler: nil))
        alert.view.tintColor = ColorCodes.logoPrimaryColor

        self.present(alert, animated: true)
    }

As you can see, it is very basic. That's why I am very confused about the strange behavior I get as this default implementation should not cause any errors, right?

Output I get

Although, through breaking the constraints, the alert displays properly on all screen sizes I would be really thankful for any help I get.

14
  • do you construct any other constraints in code ?
    – Sh_Khan
    Apr 12 '19 at 13:54
  • @Sh_Khan no I don't. I mean, obviously I have other views underneath the Alert View but they work fine and do not produce any constraint errors. But I did not change anything at the AlertView constraints Apr 12 '19 at 13:58
  • 1
    @linus_hologram, does thing causes any visual glitch on the screen? if yes then what? if no, don't waste your time on trying to fix something which is not even broken.
    – holex
    Apr 12 '19 at 14:00
  • 1
    Constraints log isn't always true , sometimes it produces misleading things
    – Sh_Khan
    Apr 12 '19 at 14:05
  • 1
    I have examined the issue with debugger, it is dynamically added constraint... I can't find this constraint before presenting an UIAlertController... See more in my answer below
    – Agisight
    Apr 12 '19 at 16:18

11 Answers 11

52

The following removes the warning without needing to disable animation. And assuming Apple eventually fixes the root cause of the warning, it shouldn't break anything else.

extension UIAlertController {
    func pruneNegativeWidthConstraints() {
        for subView in self.view.subviews {
            for constraint in subView.constraints where constraint.debugDescription.contains("width == - 16") {
                subView.removeConstraint(constraint)
            }
        }
    }
}

This can then be used like this:

// After all addActions(...), just before calling present(...)
alertController.pruneNegativeWidthConstraints()
7
  • 1
    Works great, no more log pollution! 🥳
    – Klaas
    Nov 20 '19 at 11:40
  • This is actually causing more problems now (iOS 13.2.2), not sure how it worked on earlier versions. Causing UIAlertController to show pinned to the top of the screen. Nov 28 '19 at 8:04
  • @jovanjovanovic sorry to hear that you're experiencing that, but I can't reproduce what you're describing. This solution still stands as the one that removes the warnings without adverse impact. If you have a code sample that can reproduce what you're describing, please share.
    – jims1103
    Dec 2 '19 at 20:31
  • I use this cose just after creating the Alert, but seems not working! Where is the best place to put the code? Dec 19 '19 at 10:59
  • @LucasTegliabue use it before presenting alertcontroller like let alertController = UIAlertController() alertController.pruneNegativeWidthConstraints() self.present(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)
    – Jack
    Dec 20 '19 at 21:14
43

This error is not critical, seems to be unfixed bug form Apple. This constraint appears in animation style just after presenting. enter image description here I tried to catch and change it (change values, relations, priority) before presenting – no success because of this dynamically added constraints.

When you turn off animation in self.present(alert, animated: false) and using alert.view.addSubview(UIView()) – the error disappears. I can't explain it, but it works!

let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Change your profile image", message: nil, preferredStyle: .actionSheet)

alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Photo Library", style: .default, handler: nil))
alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Online Stock Library", style: .default, handler: nil))
let cancel = UIAlertAction(title: "Cancel", style: .destructive, handler: nil)

alert.addAction(cancel)
alert.view.addSubview(UIView()) // I can't explain it, but it works!

self.present(alert, animated: false)
11
  • 1
    how is this answer related to the constraint-issue the OP has?
    – holex
    Apr 12 '19 at 13:57
  • 4
    turn off the animation + alert.view.addSubview(UIView()) worked for me. But without the animation, feels so weird... Thanks for this solution anyway.
    – Tieda Wei
    Apr 15 '19 at 20:53
  • 1
    Yes, I explain it as bug from Apple. I explained it. But if you can to solve in, you can try to get needed constraint and change it. I think that is not a good idea, cuz it is a bug.
    – Agisight
    May 3 '19 at 21:32
  • 1
    I think that adding a subview forces the autolayout constraints being re-calculated, silencing the warning. Jul 9 '19 at 6:57
  • 3
    This issue occurs when animation is set to true. I think it is an internal bug and it can be ignored since the actoinSheet shows properly. I am glad I could narrow it down to the root cause, at first I taught it was my code. Jul 19 '19 at 21:06
20

It's a new bug in iOS versions:

  • 12.2
  • 12.3
  • 12.4
  • 13.0
  • 13.1
  • 13.2
  • 13.2.3
  • 13.3
  • 13.4
  • 13.4.1
  • 13.5
  • 13.6
  • 14.0
  • 14.2
  • 14.4

The only thing we can do is to file a bug report to Apple (I just did that and you should too).

I'll try to update answer for a new version(s) of iOS when it come out.

1
  • 1
    Looks like they fixed it in iOS 14.5 - tested in a Swift 5/Xcode 12.5/iOS 12.3 project with the iPhone SE2 simulator. In the same project the iPhone SE 12.4 simulator logs the message in console.
    – Neph
    May 5 at 12:03
8

Adding to this answer...This seems to remove the issue for me and doesn't require any changes to existing code.

extension UIAlertController {
    override open func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        pruneNegativeWidthConstraints()
    }

    func pruneNegativeWidthConstraints() {
        for subView in self.view.subviews {
            for constraint in subView.constraints where constraint.debugDescription.contains("width == - 16") {
                subView.removeConstraint(constraint)
            }
        }
    }
}
0
2

Safe Solution

You should not remove the constraint because it is used in the future with a correct value.

As an alternative, you can change its constant to a positive value:

class PXAlertController: UIAlertController {
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        for subview in self.view.subviews {
            for constraint in subview.constraints {
                if constraint.firstAttribute == .width && constraint.constant == -16 {
                    constraint.constant = 10 // Any positive value
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

And then to initialize your controller use:

let controller = PXAlertController(title: "Title", message: "Message", preferredStyle: .actionSheet)
3
  • I tried all proposed solutions applicable in Swift without success. I am using XCode 11.5, compiling for ios 13.0, running in iPhone Xs Max. Still getting "<NSLayoutConstraint:0x28002b930 UIView:0x102e32420.width == - 16 (active)>" . I can't help much if not by telling you the issue is still there. As somebody suggested, I will just ignore the error, but i don't like it. Jun 1 '20 at 22:17
  • it doesn't work at all. The solution from RichW works at least on iOS 13 Aug 17 '20 at 11:26
  • @VyachaslavGerchicov Be careful though, I believe that older iOS versions would crash when changing a required constraint to nonrequired at runtime. stackoverflow.com/questions/31186187/… Aug 17 '20 at 18:21
1

Interesting ideas here. Personally I don't like the idea of deleting the constraint or changing it's value (size).

As the issue hinges on the constraint resolution being forced into a position where it must break a mandated (priority 1000) constraint, a less brutal approach is just to tell the framework that this constraint could be broken if needed.

So (based on Josh's "Safe" class):

class PXAlertController: UIAlertController {
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        tweakProblemWidthConstraints()
    }
    
    func tweakProblemWidthConstraints() {
        for subView in self.view.subviews {
            for constraint in subView.constraints {
                // Identify the problem constraint
                // Check that it's priority 1000 - which is the cause of the conflict.
                if constraint.firstAttribute == .width &&
                    constraint.constant == -16 &&
                    constraint.priority.rawValue == 1000 {
                    // Let the framework know it's okay to break this constraint
                    constraint.priority = UILayoutPriority(rawValue: 999)
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

This has the advantages that it doesn't change any layout dimensions, it also stands a good chance of being well behaved in the event of a fix in the framework.

Tested in iPhone SE simulator (which was giving me my original problem) - constraint related debug has gone.

2
1

An alternative way of getting away from the NSLayoutConstraint bug, is to use preferredStyle: .alert instead of preferredStyle: .actionSheet. This works without generating warnings, but it will display the menu modally.

0

The solution for Objective-C:

  1. Subclass your own Alert Controller from UIAlertController
  2. Define prune-function like in previous reply

    @implementation TemplateAlertController
    
    -(void) viewDidLoad {
    
        [super viewDidLoad];
        [self mPruneNegativeWithConstraints];
    }
    
    -(void) mPruneNegativeWithConstraints {
    
        for (UIView* iSubview in [self.view subviews]) {
            for (NSLayoutConstraint* iConstraint in [iSubview constraints]) {
                if ([iConstraint.debugDescription containsString:@"width == - 16"]) {
                    [iSubview removeConstraint:iConstraint];
                }
            }
        }
    }
    
    @end
    
0
0

If you want to keep animation and all constraints, you should find a negative constraint and make it positive before presenting alert controller.

// Find negative constraint and make it positive
for subview in alert.view.subviews {
    for constraint in subview.constraints {
        if constraint.constant < 0 {
            constraint.constant = -constraint.constant
        }
    }
}

// Present alert controller
present(alert, animated: true)
0

Here the function that I use to solve the issue. The issue appears because the constraint is being minus that I don't know why.

    func showActionSheet(title: String, message: String, actions: [UIAlertAction]) {
        let alertController = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle: .actionSheet)
        actions.forEach { alertController.addAction($0) }
        let subviewConstraint = alertController.view.subviews
            .flatMap({ $0.constraints })
            .filter({ $0.constant < 0 })
        for subviewConstraint in subviewConstraint {
            subviewConstraint.constant = -subviewConstraint.constant // this is the answer
        }
        self.present(alertController, animated: true)
    }
0

Create view extension for getting all constraints

extension UIView {
   func callRecursively(_ body: (_ subview: UIView) -> Void) {
      body(self)
      subviews.forEach { $0.callRecursively(body) }
   }
}

Create UIAlertController extension to find all constraints with -16 constant and change it priority to 999

extension UIAlertController {
   func fixConstraints() -> UIAlertController {
      view.callRecursively { subview in
         subview.constraints
            .filter({ $0.constant == -16 })
            .forEach({ $0.priority = UILayoutPriority(rawValue: 999)})
    }
    return self
    }
}

Create your alert and call fixConstraints() while presenting:

let alert = UIAlertController(...
...
present(alert.fixConstraints(), animated: true, completion: nil)

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