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Is there a function that does the opposite of binary_dilation? I'm looking to remove 'islands' from an array of 0's and 1's. That is, if a value of 1 in a 2D array doesn't have at least 1 adjacent neighbor that is also 1, its value gets set to 0 (rather than have its neighbor's values set equal to 1 as in binary_dilation). So for example:

test = np.zeros((5,5))
test[1,1] = test[1,2] = test[3,3] = test[4,3] = test[0,3] = test[3,1] = 1

test
array([[0., 0., 0., 1., 0.],
       [0., 1., 1., 0., 0.],
       [0., 0., 0., 0., 0.],
       [0., 1., 0., 1., 0.],
       [0., 0., 0., 1., 0.]])

And the function I'm seeking would return:

array([[0., 0., 0., 0., 0.],
       [0., 1., 1., 0., 0.],
       [0., 0., 0., 0., 0.],
       [0., 0., 0., 1., 0.],
       [0., 0., 0., 1., 0.]])

Note the values changed in locations [0,3] and [3,1] from 1 to 0 because they have no adjacent neighbors with a value equal 1 (diagonal doesn't count as a neighbor).

  • As described this is not directly analogous to a binary erosion. You seem to actually be looking for a filter that looks for connected components (only orthogonal connectivity rather than diagonal as well) and eliminates components with area == 1. I would steer your search towards "connected component labeling" instead. – Aaron Apr 12 '19 at 19:24
2

You can create a mask with the cells to check and do a 2d convolution with test to identify the cells with 1s adjacent to them. The logical and of the convolution and test should produce the desired output.

First define your mask. Since you are only looking for up/down and left/right adjacency, you want the following:

mask = np.ones((3, 3))
mask[1,1] = mask[0, 0] = mask[0, 2] = mask[2, 0] = mask[2, 2] = 0
print(mask)
#array([[0., 1., 0.],
#       [1., 0., 1.],
#       [0., 1., 0.]])

If you wanted to include diagonal elements, you'd simply update mask to include 1s in the corners.

Now apply a 2d convolution of test with mask. This will multiply and add the values from the two matrices. With this mask, this will have the effect of returning the sum of all adjacent values for each cell.

from scipy.signal import convolve2d
print(convolve2d(test, mask, mode='same'))
#array([[0., 1., 2., 0., 1.],
#       [1., 1., 1., 2., 0.],
#       [0., 2., 1., 1., 0.],
#       [1., 0., 2., 1., 1.],
#       [0., 1., 1., 1., 1.]])

You have to specify mode='same' so the result is the same size as the first input (test). Notice that the two cells that you wanted to remove from test are 0 in the convolution output.

Finally do a element wise and operation with this output and test to find the desired cells:

res = np.logical_and(convolve2d(test, mask, mode='same'), test).astype(int)
print(res)
#array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#       [0, 1, 1, 0, 0],
#       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
#       [0, 0, 0, 1, 0],
#       [0, 0, 0, 1, 0]])

Update

For the last step, you could also just clip the values in the convolution between 0 and 1 and do an element wise multiplication.

res = convolve2d(test, mask, mode='same').clip(0, 1)*test
#array([[0., 0., 0., 0., 0.],
#       [0., 1., 1., 0., 0.],
#       [0., 0., 0., 0., 0.],
#       [0., 0., 0., 1., 0.],
#       [0., 0., 0., 1., 0.]])

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