1

I need to make JUnit/Mockito tests for that code but I don't have an idea how to start it. I couldn't find an answer or any help in SO so I made a new topic. Could someone write an example of how I should do this?

 @Override
    public List<CurrencyList> currencyValuesNBP() {
        ArrayList<CurrencyList> currencyListArrayList = new ArrayList<>();

        try {
            URL url = new URL("http://api.nbp.pl/api/exchangerates/tables/A?format=json");
            HttpURLConnection httpURLConnection = (HttpURLConnection) url.openConnection();
            httpURLConnection.setRequestMethod("GET");
            httpURLConnection.setRequestProperty("Content-Type", "application/json");

            InputStreamReader inputStreamReader = new InputStreamReader(httpURLConnection.getInputStream());
            BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(inputStreamReader);
            String jsonOutput = bufferedReader.readLine();

            httpURLConnection.disconnect();

            ObjectMapper objectMapper = new ObjectMapper();
            currencyListArrayList = objectMapper.readValue(jsonOutput, new TypeReference<ArrayList<CurrencyList>>() {
            });

        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return currencyListArrayList;
    }
  • what your test should check exactly about this method? – Maciej Kowalski Apr 13 at 16:38
  • 2
    keep in mind that you would need to refactor this method quite a bit in order to be able to isolate behavior for a unit tetst – Maciej Kowalski Apr 13 at 16:41
  • 1
    Never actually wrote these kinds of junit tests, but it seems to me you might want to add some boiler plate code for raising a simple test server which will provide you with data for the URL being used by you method. From then on things should be straight forward IMHO. Also - it seems like a rather rigid implementation - would you not rather have a base method which, given a URL, returns a base object, and use this method for specific URLs and their specific returned objects? – Rann Lifshitz Apr 13 at 16:42
  • You can create a mock server using WireMock, there's no need to create an actual server for a unit test. See this : stackoverflow.com/questions/606352/… – ionut Apr 13 at 18:47
0

I would suggest 2 approaches to testing your method:

  1. Using a dedicated testing server - In your JUnit class, create an instance of a server which will return a fixed object when receiving the URL your method uses ('http://api.nbp.pl/api/exchangerates/tables/A?format=json'). You can use a mock server such as WireMock, as mentioned by ionut. After setting up the server, you can invoke your tested method and perform the required checks on its return values. The cons of this approach - needing to create a server and having to change the unit test code if the URL is changed in the method implementation.
  2. Refactoring your method to a core method and a specific usage method, and testing the core method - refactor your code to the following:

@Override public List<CurrencyList> currencyValuesNBP() { List<CurrencyList> currencyListArrayList = new ArrayList<>();

    try {
        URL url = new URL("http://api.nbp.pl/api/exchangerates/tables/A?format=json");
        ObjectMapper objectMapper = new ObjectMapper();
        currencyListArrayList = objectMapper.readValue(handleRESTApiCall(url), new TypeReference<ArrayList<CurrencyList>>() {
        });

    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return currencyListArrayList;
}

public String handleRESTApiCall(URL url) {
    try {
        HttpURLConnection httpURLConnection = (HttpURLConnection) url.openConnection();
        httpURLConnection.setRequestMethod("GET");
        httpURLConnection.setRequestProperty("Content-Type", "application/json");

        InputStreamReader inputStreamReader = new InputStreamReader(httpURLConnection.getInputStream());
        BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(inputStreamReader);
        String jsonOutput = bufferedReader.readLine();

        httpURLConnection.disconnect();
        return jsonOutput;

    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return "";
}

You can now test, using Mockito on a URL instance, the handleRESTApiCall without the need for a server instance. The cons are the need to add additional boiler plating on the output of the handleRESTApiCall in order to get the object you wish to verify. However, you will benefit from having a basic recurring solution for handling REST api calls in your code.

Refrences:

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