1

How can I do this in VB6.0...

There's a default Caption in Textbox when it is empty, let say "Enter Name Here". but when the user fills in, the Caption will be replaced...

  • explain your question more ! – Sourav Apr 6 '11 at 14:19
  • He means a cuetip or placeholder. – SLaks Apr 6 '11 at 14:21
0
Private Sub Text1_Change()  
If Trim(Text1.Text) = "" Then
Label1.Caption = "Enter Name Here"
Else
Label1.Caption = ""
End If
End Sub

Private Sub Text1_Click()
Label1.Caption = "Enter Name Here"
End Sub

Private Sub Text1_KeyDown(KeyCode As Integer, Shift As Integer)
If Trim(Text1.Text) = "" Then
 Label1.Caption = "Enter Name Here"
Else
 Label1.Caption = ""
 End If
End Sub
  • if it helps please vote me up :) and put the tick mark – Sourav Apr 6 '11 at 14:29
  • 4
    @Sourav: Please don't beg for votes in the comments. It's been 3 minutes; no one can accept your answer that quickly anyway. – Cody Gray Apr 6 '11 at 14:33
  • :P, it's been a bad day for me, no one helped me in my question !!! – Sourav Apr 6 '11 at 14:34
  • 1
    I'm sorry about that. I looked at your recent questions, but none of them concern anything I know anything about. Otherwise, I'd be happy to help. I'm not sure what that has to do with begging for upvotes, though... – Cody Gray Apr 6 '11 at 14:40
  • I don't understand why this answer was accepted. It shows the caption on a label control, rather than in the textbox itself. The other solutions all seem much more appropriate and in-line with what the asker was seeking. If you're going to use a separate label control to display the prompt text, it's not clear why you can't just display the label text all the time. The only reason you'd need to hide it would be if it was actually displayed in the textbox, and needed to get out of the way when the user started typing. – Cody Gray Apr 7 '11 at 6:50
7

The Windows API has had cue banners (or prompt text) built in since Windows XP. It's not directly exposed by VB 6, but that doesn't stop you from getting at it by making a few API calls.

There are several advantages of going this route, versus implementing your own custom style. For one thing, it's already available for free, meaning you have to do very little work to use it. Second, it's already been fully tested and professionally polished. Third, it will automatically get upgrades whenever the next version of Windows comes out.

All the code you need is available here: SendMessage: Use Cue Banners to Prompt Users

As the page explains, you need to make sure that you've included a manifest with your EXE so that you can take advantage of the Windows XP themes and features. The only real tricky part about the code is that you need to make sure you pass a Unicode string.

The final effect looks something like this:

   Cue Banner sample

2

if you want a default value in the textbox until a user selects the box to begin typing:

use the GotFocus() event for your textbox and insert the following as your code: txtName.text = ""

in the LostFocus() event use:

If txtName.text = "" Then
txtName.text = "Enter Name Here"
End If
0

Native win32 Alternative:

Private Const ECM_FIRST As Long = &H1500
Private Const EM_SETCUEBANNER As Long = (ECM_FIRST + 1)

Private Declare Function SendMessage Lib "user32" Alias "SendMessageA" (ByVal hwnd As Long, ByVal wMsg As Long, ByVal wParam As Long, lParam As Any) As Long
Private Declare Function InitCommonControls Lib "comctl32" () As Long

Private Sub Form_Initialize()
    InitCommonControls
End Sub

Private Sub Form_Load()
    Dim sCueCaption As String
    sCueCaption = StrConv("Enter Name Here", vbUnicode)
    Call SendMessage(Text1.hwnd, EM_SETCUEBANNER, 0&, ByVal sCueCaption)
End Sub

This needs a manifest so the following saved as "<exename>.exe.manifest" (Can also use a resource)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<assembly
   xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1"
   manifestVersion="1.0">
   <assemblyIdentity
      type="win32"
      processorArchitecture="*"
      version="6.0.0.0"
      name="test"
   />
   <description>Enter your Description Here</description>
   <dependency>
      <dependentAssembly>
         <assemblyIdentity
            type="win32"
            name="Microsoft.Windows.Common-Controls"
            version="6.0.0.0"
            language="*"
            processorArchitecture="*"
            publicKeyToken="6595b64144ccf1df"
         />
      </dependentAssembly>
   </dependency>
</assembly>
  • Form_Initialize is often too late for calling InitCommonControls, do it in Sub Main instead. Also you will find that even this crashes sometimes unless you load Shell32.dll before calling InitCommonControls. To avoid "works on MY machine" syndrome do both of these in the right sequence before loading any Forms. A call to IsUserAnAdmin in Shell32 is enough to get it loaded, you don't need LoadLibrary. – Bob77 Apr 7 '11 at 0:23
  • Why call InitCommonControls at all? The function is deprecated and has been replaced by InitCommonControlsEx. The latter is available at least as far back as Windows 2000, and provides much more flexibility in the control classes that you register. The former only registers the Windows 95 classes. See the documentation for details. – Cody Gray Apr 7 '11 at 6:53
  • @Bob: LoadLibrary prevents a crash on application shutdown if VB runtime unloads shell32 too early. It works by locking the dll in process space until process is terminated completely. – wqw Apr 7 '11 at 6:54
  • @wqw: I've never heard of such a thing. What could possibly cause the VB runtime to unload shell32.dll too early? The only time this might apply is if you're subclassing. That's not the case here, there's no chance of the DLL being unloaded too early. (And there are better ways to subclass. LoadLibrary isn't the answer.) – Cody Gray Apr 7 '11 at 7:05

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