27

I am doing a code review, and have found alot of code with the following format:

public MyResponse MyMethod(string arg)
{
    using (Tracer myTracer = new Tracer(Constants.TraceLog))
    {
        MyResponse abc = new MyResponse();

        // Some code

        return abc;
    }
}

When I run a code analysis I get a CA2000 warning Microsoft.Reliability

Should the code be rewritten as:

public MyResponse MyMethod(string arg)
{
   MyResponse abc = new MyResponse();

   using (Tracer myTracer = new Tracer(Constants.TraceLog))
   {
       // Some code
   }
   return abc;
}

Or does it not matter?

Edit

The line on which it is reporting the warning is:

MyResponse abc = new MyResponse();

MyResponse is a standard Dataset.

The full error message is:

Warning 150 CA2000 : Microsoft.Reliability : In method 'xxxxx(Guid, Guid)', object 'MyResponse ' is not disposed along all exception paths. Call System.IDisposable.Dispose on object 'MyResponse ' before all references to it are out of scope.

  • 1
    Is MyResponse IDisposable? – Jon Apr 6 '11 at 14:34
  • 1
    This warning doesn't really make sense IMHO... I can't see any reason why the second version would be better – Thomas Levesque Apr 6 '11 at 14:34
  • @Jon, whether it is or not, MyResponse isn't subject to the disposing semantics of using. It's not the issue here, other than being the object returned. – Anthony Pegram Apr 6 '11 at 14:35
  • 4
    Is there some reason why you're keeping the text of the warning a secret from us? We don't have psychic powers; if you want a diagnosis of the error message post the message. – Eric Lippert Apr 6 '11 at 15:23
  • 1
    @Eric: Normally, I would agree with you, but CA2000 with his example is pretty clear, don't you think so? – Daniel Hilgarth Apr 6 '11 at 15:29
11

Your rewrite will not fix that CA2000 warning, because the problem is not the Tracer object, but the MyResponse object.
The documentation states:

The following are some situations where the using statement is not enough to protect IDisposable objects and can cause CA2000 to occur.
Returning a disposable object requires that the object is constructed in a try/finally block outside a using block.

To fix the warning without messing with the stack trace of your exceptions (<- click, it's a link), use this code:

public MyResponse MyMethod(string arg)
{
   MyResponse tmpResponse = null;
   MyResponse response = null;
   try
   {
       tmpResponse = new MyResponse();

       using (Tracer myTracer = new Tracer(Constants.TraceLog))
       {
           // Some code
       }

       response = tmpResponse;
       tmpResponse = null;
    }
    finally
    {
        if(tmpResponse != null)
            tmpResponse .Dispose();
    }
    return response;
}

Why? Please see the example in the linked documentation.

  • 1
    I think try/catch might be preferable, as it doesn't require you create a temp variable -- the cure here might be worse than the disease. – Jon Apr 6 '11 at 14:49
  • It completely depends on your situation, if you want to implement something that will fix this warning or not. I wouldn't because I don't see it as a problem, if that method isn't called very often. However, I disagree with using a try/catch, because it might mess with the stack trace of the exception (see link in answer). – Daniel Hilgarth Apr 6 '11 at 14:50
  • BTW: The fixed provided by me is the official recommendation by MS to fix this warning. – Daniel Hilgarth Apr 6 '11 at 14:51
  • @DanielHilgarth: There is no "might" in programming; throw; does not mess up the stack trace and that's that. As for the official recommendation, I don't think that as professionals we should be blindly "following orders". We can and should judge the merits of each approach independently. Anyway, I 'm not advocating the one true solution here; just saying that if readability matters to you as it does to me, try/catch might be better. – Jon Apr 6 '11 at 14:54
  • @Jon: Please read the link provided, if the exception is thrown in the same method as the try/catch with the throw, it does mess with the stack trace! About blindly following orders: I fully agree, but the solution provided is the way that solves the problem without side effects. – Daniel Hilgarth Apr 6 '11 at 14:56
15

No, it doesn't matter.

The finally block that's implicitly generated by the using statement to handle disposal will execute no matter where you put the return.

Are you sure that the CA2000 relates to myTracer and not abc? I would guess that the warning is occurring because MyResponse implements IDisposable and you're not disposing abc before returning. (Either way, your suggested rewrite should make no difference to the warning.)

  • Your answer is confusing if you read the title of the post. – smartcaveman Apr 6 '11 at 14:35
  • 1
    @smartcaveman - The question ends with the question "Or does it not matter?" so the statement at the beginning of this answer is perfectly fine. – Richard Szalay Apr 6 '11 at 14:36
  • @Richard, I didn't say it was wrong. I said it was confusing in context of the title. – smartcaveman Apr 6 '11 at 14:37
  • I don't want to be picky, but I don't understand why this answer has been upvoted that much. The first part has nothing to do with the provided warning and the second part doesn't provide a solution... – Daniel Hilgarth Apr 6 '11 at 15:24
  • 3
    @Daniel: The OP asks "is it ok to return from inside a using block" and "should the code be rewritten to move the return outside the using block". I'm answering those questions, as asked, and then speculating on the real underlying cause of the problem (speculating because the OP doesn't provide enough concrete details). Your own answer provides a solution to the (putative) real problem, I'm happy to reproduce something similar here if you think it's worthwhile. – LukeH Apr 6 '11 at 15:39
4

The warning is probably about MyResponse, which is IDisposable.

Why does the warning appear?

If a MyResponse object is constructed, but code later in the method causes an exception to be thrown, then all references to this object will be lost (we only had one, and didn't manage to return it). This means that Dispose cannot be called on the object anymore, and we will be relying on the class finalizer to clean up any resources.

Does it matter?

Generally speaking, it will only matter if:

  • The IDisposable encapsulates a resource that might be needed "soon" by other parts of the program or by another process
  • An exception is thrown before the method returns, to trigger the "problem"
  • That resource is not released by the finalizer soon enough, or for some reason the finalizer never runs but your application doesn't go down

So no, it shouldn't really matter.

How to fix it?

public MyResponse MyMethod(string arg)
{
    MyResponse abc = null;
    try {
        abc = new MyResponse();
        using (Tracer myTracer = new Tracer(Constants.TraceLog))
        {
            // Some code
           return abc;
        }
    }
    catch {
        if (abc != null) {
            abc.Dispose();
        }

        throw;
    }
}

This ensures that if control exits the method by means of an exception, abc is either null or has been properly disposed.

Update

It turns out when using this way of handling things, an exception explicitly thrown from inside MyMethod will be rethrown and have the line number of the first stack frame mutated to point to the throw; statement.

Practically this means that if you have multiple throw statements inside MyResponse, and they throw the same type of exception with the same message, you will not be able to tell which throw was responsible exactly when you catch the exception.

This is IMHO a purely academic problem, but I mention it for completeness.

  • I would always dispose of IDisposable objects. There's no guarantee that an IDisposable class even has a finalizer. – TrueWill Apr 6 '11 at 15:06
  • 2
    @TrueWill: So you would ban from your code any method that returns an IDisposable? Isn't that taking things a bit too far? Here's one victim of that strategy: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b9skfh7s.aspx. Disposables should be disposed, sure, but only after we 're done using them. – Jon Apr 6 '11 at 15:09
  • I would not ban that. Methods can return an IDisposable, but every disposable instance must have an owner (in the sense of something that is responsible for disposing of it). The method contract (probably XML comments) should specify if the caller is responsible for disposing of the returned instance or not. – TrueWill Apr 7 '11 at 23:30
  • BTW: you can skip the abc=null assignment and if(abc!=null) check completely and just place abc = new MyResponse(); just before the try block -- without any change (neither loosing exceptions nor disposable instances). – springy76 Oct 2 '11 at 22:35
2

It doesn't really matter. But, contrary to @Aliostad, I think version 2, with the return outside of the using block is better style.

My rationale goes like this:

The using block denotes something that is "opened" and "closed". This is a kind of cheep transaction. Closing the using block says we have done our work and it is safe now to continue with other stuff, like returning.

0

This warning is probably related to the principle of "single exit point". It is discussed here: http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?SingleFunctionExitPoint

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