24

I expected that below code will output 10 because (~port) equal to 10100101 So, when we right shift it by 4 we get 00001010 which is 10. But the output is 250! Why?

int main()
{
    uint8_t port = 0x5a;
    uint8_t result_8 =  (~port) >> 4;
    //result_8 = result_8 >> 4;

    printf("%i", result_8);

    return 0;
}

1 Answer 1

31

C promotes uint8_t to int before doing operations on it. So:

  1. port is promoted to signed integer 0x0000005a.
  2. ~ inverts it giving 0xffffffa5.
  3. An arithmetic shift returns 0xfffffffa.
  4. It's truncated back into a uint8_t giving 0xfa == 250.

To fix that, either truncate the temporary result:

uint8_t result_8 = (uint8_t)(~port) >> 4;

mask it:

uint8_t result_8 = (~port & 0xff) >> 4;

or xor it (thanks @Nayuki!):

uint8_t result_8 = (port ^ 0xff) >> 4;
6
  • you're right but i think C doesn't promote only uint8_t but also unsigned char because i tested it with unsigned char too and got the same result! Am i right? Apr 15, 2019 at 1:04
  • 14
    uint8_t is, very likely, a synonym of unsigned char on your system. The promotion rules apply to all integral types smaller than int. Apr 15, 2019 at 1:07
  • 7
    Or explicitly only flip the low 8 bits: result = (port ^ 0xFF) >> 4;
    – Nayuki
    Apr 15, 2019 at 2:16
  • Does C++ do that too? Apr 15, 2019 at 8:41
  • 3
    @TomášZato: Yes. See en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/… Apr 15, 2019 at 9:02

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