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This question already has an answer here:

For example I got this code:

#include <memory>

class A {
 public:
  A(int i, float f){};
  A(std::string){};
  ...
};

class B {
 public:
  B(int i){};
  B(float f){};
  ...
};

std::unique_ptr<A> getA() {
  if (some condition) {
    return std::make_unique<A>(1,1.0);
  } else if (some condition) {
    return std::make_unique<A>("test");
  }
}

std::unique_ptr<B> getB() {
        if (some condition) {
    return std::make_unique<B>(1);
  } else if (some condition) {
    return std::make_unique<B>(1.0);
  }
}

Can I just write code like thisreturn std::make_unique(1,1.0); (no <A>)? I think the compiler knows the return type, and only constructor parameters of class A matters in this line. So is there any way I can omit the type parameter?

I want this because in the real problem, the are lots of class types(with long names), and each class has lot's of constructors, it's annoying to write return make::unique<*type*>(*parameters*) every time when returning.

marked as duplicate by StoryTeller c++ Apr 15 at 12:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Whenever you see something like this it should tell you that there is a better way to structure your code. – stark Apr 15 at 10:51
  • @stark any suggestions? – reavenisadesk Apr 15 at 10:52
  • Why templates, of course. This is what templates are for. – Sam Varshavchik Apr 15 at 11:02
  • I don't think there's anything wrong with fantasising on this being possible. Something like std::make_unique<decltype(return)::pointer_type>? Which is why I upvoted the question. – Bathsheba Apr 15 at 11:02
  • Why do you want to do that if i may know? – Hemil Apr 15 at 11:16
2

You can get it with a helper class that has the right convertor to unique_ptr:

#include <tuple>
#include <memory>
#include <utility>
template <class ...Ts>
class unique_ptr_maker : private std::tuple<Ts...>
{
  public:
    using std::tuple<Ts...>::tuple;
    template <class T>
    operator std::unique_ptr<T>() &&
    {
        return move_it<T>(std::make_index_sequence<sizeof...(Ts)>());
    } 
  private:
    template <class T, std::size_t... Is>
    std::unique_ptr<T> move_it(std::index_sequence<Is...>)
    {
        using parent = std::tuple<Ts...>;
        return std::make_unique<T>(
            std::forward<std::tuple_element_t<Is, parent>>( 
                std::get<Is>(*this))...);
    }
};

template <class ...Ts>
unique_ptr_maker<Ts...> get_unique_maker(Ts &&...ts)
{
    return unique_ptr_maker<Ts...>(std::forward<Ts>(ts)...);
}

Then the usage is:

std::unique_ptr<B> getB() {
        if (some condition) {
    return get_unique_maker(1);
  } else if (some condition) {
    return get_unique_maker(1.0);
  }
}

Explanation

This solution works in two stages:

  1. It packs all constructor parameters in a tuple, which is the parent of unique_ptr_maker.
  2. The child of the tuple, unique_ptr_maker, has an auto-convert operator to unique_ptr. This operator is invoked whenever the unique_ptr_maker happens to be where unique_ptr<T> is expected.

Unfortunately, type checking of the parameters of the constructor of T (from unique_ptr<T>) happen late. As a result, the errors can be confusing. I can't see how the situation can be made much better, since potential problems can't be detected before the conversion operator anyway.

EDIT

Made it work with move-only parameters.

  • It works. Shame that I don't even understand this code. Did you use SFINE to figure out which constructor suits the parameter of get_unique_maker()? – reavenisadesk Apr 15 at 11:37
  • @reavenisadesk No SFINAE. I have added some explanations to the answer, which I hope will clarify the mystery – Michael Veksler Apr 15 at 11:47
  • Great thanks, I rarely use conversion operators, now I fully understand your code. – reavenisadesk Apr 15 at 12:30

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