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Current scenario: We have database table to log the auditing data and the query gets fired on the table based on object_id most of time and seldom on created_date range. audit_log table stores last one month data and after a month data gets moved to archive_audit_log table. These tables sits in Amazon RDS.

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS audit_log (
id INT AUTO_INCREMENT,
object_id INT NOT NULL,
created_date DATE,
old_value TEXT,
new_value TEXT,
PRIMARY KEY (id)
)  ENGINE=INNODB;

Approx ~1M+ records in the table.

And corresponding archiving table with exact same structure.

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS archive_audit_log (
id INT AUTO_INCREMENT,
object_id INT NOT NULL,
created_date DATE,
old_value TEXT,
new_value TEXT,
PRIMARY KEY (id)
)ENGINE=ARCHIVE;

Approx ~40M+ records in the table and keeps growing and current size in one of database is (90 GB). This data can't be deleted because of our contractual obligations with customers.

Problems I'm facing: UI usually time out as and when we query on the archive_audit_log. Its takes longer to do any import/export and daily backups and many others.

Solution I'm thinking: I'm thinking to move archive_audit_log data to S3 into multiple files and then query using 'Amazon Athena` service to get the result.

I want to know if someone is using AWS Athena for such use case before burning my hand? Also, are there any limitation or restriction that gets applied on number of queries vs number of records in results? Thank you for reading the question, any pointers would be appreciated.

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This sounds like a good use case for Athena. Instead of moving rows to the archive_audit_log, move them to CSVs on S3 and use Athena to query them. Depending on what platform your application uses you will have to rewrite it to be able to run the queries against Athena (the SQL dialect is slightly different than MySQL, and the driver will be different, for example).

There are limits in Athena, like how many concurrent queries you can run, but no limits on records in the result. If you hit the limit of concurrent queries you can ask AWS support to increase your limit, and I'm fairly confident that you will not have any problems with the limits. There is a hard limit of 30 minute runtime per query, but that is also very unlikely that you would hit. 40M rows is nothing to Athena.

  • OK, Thank you for the response, let me try. – Red Boy Apr 16 at 12:22
  • If possible I'd highly recommend storing the data in S3 in parquet format instead of CSV, this will give you vastly better performance on large data sets. – Nathan Griffiths 17 hours ago

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